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Ivory smuggling route tracked via fake tusks with GPS

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National Geographic reporter Bryan Christy commissioned two fake elephant tusks embedded with GPS, then planted them to track ivory smuggling routes from the Central African Republic into Sudan.

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National Geographic's Pluto issue, autographed by NASA's New Horizons team

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Susan Goldberg: “How cool is this? The @NASANewHorizons #Pluto team autographed our fab July @NatGeo cover, written by @nadiamdrake.”

More: Pluto coverage on Boing Boing.

The Americas' Oldest Teenager

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She's approximately 12,000 years old now, but when she died in the Yucatan Peninsula she was only a teen.

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How To: Film cheetahs in slow motion

For this project you will need one cat toy on a string, a high-speed camera mounted on a moveable track, and also some cheetahs.

This behind-the-scenes video shows you how National Geographic and the Cincinnati Zoo captured amazing footage of big cats in motion. It's a complicated process and I wish they'd shown more of the animal-handling part of it. I certainly didn't realize that some zoo animals were so comfortable with humans that you could walk them around on a leash and let them off to run free around a dozen unfamiliar members of a camera crew. Still great to watch, though.

Via Laughing Squid, which has the 7-minute video showing the final footage of running cheetahs.