This pilot takes astonishing aerial nighttime storm photographs

Ecuadorean pilot Santiago Borja Lopez makes the most of his downtime at work, taking stunning photos of dramatic storms, often lit by the moon. Read the rest

Spectacular timelapse of clouds filling the entire Grand Canyon

The latest stunning video from artistic collaborators in the dark sky movement is Kaibab Elegy by Harun Mehmedinovic, shot at the Grand Canyon. At about a minute in, there's a rare and hypnotic full cloud inversion worth the wait. Read the rest

Super-slow-mo video reveals how ladybug wings unfold

Because ladybug hindwings are covered by an opaque outer shell called an elytra, scientists were not sure how the wings' folding mechanism worked until Kazuya Saito created a clear replacement shell that allowed them to film the process in super slow-motion. Read the rest

Adorable otters seem OK with unsettling otter spycam

If otters experience the uncanny valley, this otter-like spycam seems just enough like an otter for them to accept, but not enough like an otter for them to consider a threat. Read the rest

This remarkable timelapse of flowers took 3 years to film

Whenever it seems that timelapse has become a bit overused, someone like Jamie Scott refreshes the format with something like Spring, a dizzying film of flowers in bloom. Read the rest

This otherworldly place in China inspired the movie Avatar's landscape

The striking sandstone spires of Zhangjiajie National Park, China's first UNESCO World Heritage Site, inspired the landscape of Pandora, the setting of James Cameron's Avatar.

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Mushrooms may help in the fight against bee colony collapse

It's mushrooms to the rescue in a major study to stop bee colony collapse disorder. One culprit, parasitic varroa mites, stood out as a major threat because they were developing tolerance for many pesticides. Read the rest

Crows atop other birds

Crows are smart, and they can be kind of jerks sometimes. To wit: this series of crows perched or riding on top of other birds. Their victims range from indifferent to grumpy. Read the rest

Flashlight fish have glowing lanterns below their eyes

Flashlight fish, also called lanterneye fish and scientifically photoblepharon (light-eye), are strange and wondrous creatures best viewed during a night dive in the Pacific. Read the rest

Cop vs. goose (spoiler: goose wins)

A Canadian goose declared it open season on cops, as this Clarksville, Tennessee detective found out. This cop-hating honker takes a gander at this cop, then puts him down. Just when the cop's goose is cooked... Read the rest

Antarctica's Blood Falls mapped and analyzed a century after discovery

One of the weirdest places in Antarctica is Blood Falls, a five-story cascade of blood-red liquid pouring from Taylor Glacier. Researchers finally traced its source: a saltwater lake millions of years old trapped under the glacier.

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Texas official photographer is the most Texas guy of all time

Wyman Meinzer describes his journey from outdoorsman to renowned photographer in this inspiring profile. Below are a couple of examples of his wonderful photography: Read the rest

Yes, flights are getting more turbulent thanks to climate change

Advances in Atmospheric Sciences reports that flying is going to get more and more turbulent, even at cruising altitudes, because of climate change:

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Beautiful nature documentary on the Australian bin chicken

One of the most striking sights in some Australian cities is the white ibis, an exotic-looking large bird that has adapted to city life as a scavenger. Here's a hilarious spoof of nature documentaries. Read the rest

Sign is accurate. Swan is aggressive.

From Sunriver Nature Centre.

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Boa probably wishes it hadn't constricted that porcupine

According to the guy who shot this with a Brazilian potato-cam, the boa constrictor attacked a porcupine, which managed to escape after leaving a few hundred spines in its attacker. Read the rest

How tardigrades survive extreme conditions

Tardigrades, the tiny creatures also known as water bears, are a house favorite at Boing Boing. Able to survive in the most extreme conditions, from alcohol immersion to empty space, their resilience poses difficult scientific questions. Scientists believe they've found the answer, and have published their findings in Molecular Cell.

Wired's Matt Simon writes:

...researchers claim they’ve found an exclusively tardigradean protein that the creature produces, forming it into a glass bead. It’s in this state that the water bear can pull off such extreme feats of survival—which might be very convenient for human medicine one day.

The problem with the [earlier] trehalose theory, as it turned out, was that while many other organisms like nematode worms and brine shrimp use it to survive desiccation, not all water bear species produce the sugar under stress. Some of those other organisms produce enough trehalose to make up 20 percent of their body weight. The water bear? Only about 2 percent.

This doesn't explain why tardigrade plushies thrive on my couch. Read the rest

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