Best monster merch of New York Comic-Con


Far and away the best monster merchandise I found at New York Comic-Con came from Scumbags & Superstars , whose tees, patches and stickers perfectly captured everything I love about monster art.

Scumbags & Superstars

"Bengal Boy" conjoined skull gaff


One of the highlights of each New York Comic-Con for me is seeing the latest gaffs and replicas from the Gemini Company (previously) -- this year's highlight was the $400 "Bengal Boy" conjoined skull gaff, shown here.

NYPD's remedial Twitter school for cops

New York's Finest need to be taught not to tweet jokes about murders they're attending, racist remarks and other difficult-to-discern no-go areas for social media.

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DOJ slams Riker's Island for horrific violence against young inmates

From the age of 16 on, children are integrated into the general population at Riker's Island, where the guards routinely engage in brutal, illegal beatings whose video evidence mysteriously disappears.

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Drone protesting grandmother gets a year in prison in Syracuse


Mary Anne Grady Flores, a grandmother from New York State, was sentenced to a year in prison for nonviolently recording a likewise nonviolent protest over the training of drone pilots at Hancock Air Base near Syracuse.

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#Mynypd hashtag attracts photos of police violence and abuse

When the NYPD's Twitter account asked people to tweet photos of their interactions with NYPD and tag them Mynypd, the outcome was pretty predictable: people who feel that the NYPD stands for unchecked brutality, mass-scale stop-and-frisk racism, and the violent defense of the ultra-rich combined with official impunity flooded the tag with photos of NYPD violence.

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New York: stop putting 16-year-olds in adult prison and trying 13-year-olds as adults!

Yuval Sheer from The New York Center for Juvenile Justice sez, "Every year in the state of New York more than 40,000 youth are arrested and prosecuted as adults. The state views 16- and 17-year-olds as adults for criminal law purposes, and it also prosecutes children 13-, 14-, and 15-year-olds as adults when they are accused of certain crimes. Prosecuting children as adults undermines their unique potential to overcome adversities and learn from mistakes made at a young age. Children tried as adults are exposed to a lifetime stigma of a criminal record and denied opportunities to receive age appropriate support. Furthermore, in New York, 16- and 17-year-olds are held in adult facilities."

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Photos of cool miniatures seen at NY Comic-Con

Boing Boing reader Michael Matise shot some wonderful photographs of miniatures and models at New York Comic-Con 2013, and shared them in the Boing Boing Flickr Pool. A few are below. Here's the whole set. Michael tells us more about the photos below.

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Man "seriously injured" by exploding toilet

Michel Pierre of New York received serious shrapnel wounds to his face, arms and legs when the toilet exploded in his Brooklyn apartment. From AFP:

'The 58-year-old information technology specialist is now so fearful that he uses a rope to flush the toilet from behind the bathroom door at a safe distance.

"Those fears are part of his damages," said his lawyer Sanford Rubenstein. "Clearly toilets are supposed to flush, not explode." Three other tenants were also injured by what the Daily News website dubbed "the porcelain bomb."'

Air pressure in the pipes, or something.

Gallery: New York Comic-Con in pictures

This weekend, we hopped into the car and made the 6-hour trip to New York to check out its fast-growing Comic-Con. Since its founding in 2006, explosive growth now makes New York Comic-Con one of the largest such events in the country. Even the mighty Javits Center in Manhattan could hardly contain the throng, estimated at more than 120,000 over four days. Here, Superman and Batman consult the useless maps provided in the convention guidebook. Photo: Rob Beschizza

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Girls? A collection of essays about being young and single in NYC

Our friends at Thought Catalog (which published Mark Dery's terrific long read, England My England: Anglophilia Explained, has a new eBook title called Girls? A Collection of Essays. Publisher Chris Lavergne says:

13 women were asked to write for this book, and given free reign over the subjects they wrote about -- the key thing that unites these stories is that they were written by young women living in NYC. But there's no unifying voice or message, there's nothing telling the reader to see themselves in every writer and in every essay. It forces the reader to view the writers as individuals.
Girls? A Collection of Essays on Amazon

New Yorkers: help defend local libraries at June 8-9's Read In

Libraries in New York City are facing a potential $106 million cut to their budgets. Should these cuts go through, more than 60 neighborhood libraries will close. More than a thousand librarians and library staff will be laid off.

Once again, for a fourth year, New Yorkers will be standing up for libraries at the 24 Hour Read In, which takes place from June 8th & 9th at the gorgeous Brooklyn Public Library Central Library. Poud library supporters will read around the clock: a literal full day of reading in support of libraries throughout the five boroughs.

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Mark at WFMU Radiovision Festival 2012, Saturday in NYC

If you are going to be in New York this weekend, I'll be giving the keynote talk at 10 am on Saturday at the WFMU Radiovision 2012 Conference. I'm going to be talking about maker culture, Boing Boing, MAKE magazine, and the future of DIY. I'm really looking forward to meeting the other attendees!

WFMU presents a full day of presentations and panel discussions about radio's future as it takes on new forms in the digital age. Featuring Boing Boing's Mark Frauenfelder, Radio ARTE's Silvain Gire, Roman Mars, The Swedish Pirate Party, Pejk Malinovski, Francesca Panetta, Tim Pool, Maria Popova, Glynn Washington and many more.
Admission prices: $80 General Admission and a discounted rate of $40 for artists, students. Both include lunch.

Full listing and schedule here

Narratively: digital magazine about New York's stories


I am rooting for the folks behind Narratively, a digital publication about "New York's untold stories."

Narratively slows down the news cycle. Each week, we’ll explore a different theme about New York and publish a series of connected stories -- just one a day -- told in the most appropriate medium for each piece. We might feature a longform article with portrait photos on a Monday, followed by an animated documentary on Tuesday, then a photo essay, an audio piece or a short documentary film. Every story gets the space and time it needs to have an impact. We’ll bring you weeks devoted to New York’s waterways, hustlers, sexual subcultures, obscure pastimes and countless other themes. We’ll even get you involved in theme and story selection.

They need $50k on Kickstarter to launch

New York Governor asks to decriminalize possession of pot in public view

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo is asking legislators to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana in public view. New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is fighting back because he believes that destroying the job prospects of 50,000 people a year (mainly young black and Latino men) benefits society, and wants continue to use a sneaky police tactic to arrest them.

NewImageIn New York, the Legislature in 1977 reduced the penalty for possession of 25 grams or less of marijuana to a violation, which carries a maximum fine of $100 for first-time offenders.

But it remains a misdemeanor if the marijuana is in public view or is being smoked in public, and lawmakers and drug-reform advocates have argued that the misdemeanor charge is often unfairly applied to suspects who did not have marijuana in public view until the police stopped them and told them to empty their pockets.

“Now it’s in public view,” Professor Levine said. “If you go by the police reports, all around New York City, there are people standing around with their palms outstretched with a bit of marijuana in them.”

From 2002 to 2011, New York City recorded 400,000 low-level marijuana arrests, according to his analysis. That represented more arrests than under Mr. Bloomberg’s three predecessors put together — a period of 24 years. Most of those arrested have been young black and Hispanic men, and most had no prior criminal convictions.

Cuomo Seeks Cut in Frisk Arrests