Boing Boing 

Laura Poitras's Citizenfour: the real story of Edward Snowden

The award-winning, fearless filmmaker's documentary on her work with Snowden premiered yesterday, and it's full of bombshells.

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NSA conducts massive surveillance without ANY Congressional oversight


An ACLU Freedom of Information request reveals that the NSA considers Reagan's "Executive Order 12333" (previously) its "primary source" of spying authority -- and so it conducts this surveillance without reporting to Congress on it.

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Secret Law is Not Law

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Cindy Cohn is on fire: "Let’s be clear: Under international human rights law, secret “law” doesn’t even qualify as 'law' at all."

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Switzerland reportedly offers Snowden safe passage, immunity from extradition

A report in the Swiss weekend paper Sonntagszeitung states that Snowden would not be extradited to the USA for "politically motivated" reasons if he were to attend hearings on illegal NSA spying.

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Meet the spooky tech companies getting rich by making NSA surveillance possible


Wildly profitable companies like Neustar, Subsentio, and Yaana do the feds' dirty work for them, slurping huge amounts of unconstitutionally requisitioned data out of telcos' and ISPs' data-centers in response to secret, sealed FISA warrants -- some of them publicly traded, too, making them a perfect addition to the Gulag Wealth Fund.

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Kickstarting a line of Orwell-inspired clothes with radio-shielding pockets

"The 1984 Collection" is a line of clothing for men and women with removable, snap-in pockets that act as radio-shields for slipping your devices and tokens (cards, phones, etc) into to stop them from being read when you're not using them.

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Twelve triple three: Secret history of Reagan's exec order that spawned mass surveillance


Ronald Reagan issued Executive Order 12333 in 1981, reversing the Carter and Ford reforms of government surveillance (sparked by the Church Commission, convened in the wake of Nixon's wiretapping scandal); GWB expanded it twice more, once during each term.

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Honorable spies anonymously leak NSA/GHCQ-discovered flaws in Tor

Andrew Lewman, head of operations for The Onion Router (TOR), an anonymity and privacy tool that is particularly loathed by the spy agencies' capos, credits Tor's anonymous bug-reporting system for giving spies a safe way to report bugs in Tor that would otherwise be weaponized to attack Tor's users.

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Save the net, break up the NSA

Bruce Schneier nails it: "efficiency is not the most important goal here; security and liberty are."

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Former NSA spook resigns from Naval War College in dick-pic scandal

John Schindler was a prof at the College; he slammed Snowden as a traitor and compared Greenwald to Hitler, and was generally dismissive about concerns about network surveillance; he also sent pictures of his dick to a woman who wasn't his wife. He also co-wrote the report that stated that Sadam Hussein had WMDs, and helped send America to war. That was a lot worse than dick pics.

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NSA notably uninvited to speak at Vegas hacker conferences this year

NSA Director Adm. Michael Rogers [REUTERS]


NSA Director Adm. Michael Rogers [REUTERS]

It's Las Vegas hacker convention season: Black Hat kicks off Aug. 2-7, and Def Con runs Aug. 7-10. This time around, National Security Agency leadership will be absent from the speaking rosters, in contrast with previous years.

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Journalist believes his phone was hacked by spooks at HOPE X, will upload image for forensics


Douglas writes, "My rooted CyanogenMod phone got hacked at HOPE X. I'm planning to get it write-blocked and imaged to crowdsource forensics."

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Leaked manual shows how US agencies put millions on "suspected terrorist" list


The 166 page "March 2013 Watchlisting Guidance" was jointly authored by 19 agencies, and has been released in full on The Intercept.

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Back doors in Apple's mobile platform for law enforcement, bosses, spies (possibly)

Jonathan Zdziarski's HOPE X talk, Identifying Backdoors, Attack Points, and Surveillance Mechanisms in iOS Devices, suggests that hundreds of millions of Iphone and Ipad devices ship from Apple with intentional back-doors that can be exploited by law enforcement, identity thieves, spies, and employers.

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Everyone hates the NSA: survey


A new Pew Study asked people all over the world how they felt about being spied upon by the NSA.

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EFF releases high-resolution photo of NSA's Utah data-center


One particularly welcome dividend from the blimp flight over the NSA data-center in Bluffdale, Utah is a much-needed piece of stock art.

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Second German suspected of spying for NSA


The German government believes that one of its military personnel has been spying on the German state for the NSA.

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NSA and FBI spied on prominent Muslim American leaders


A newly disclosed Snowden leak reveals that the NSA targeted at least five prominent Muslim American leaders, including a former Republican Congressional nominee who served in GW Bush's Department of Homeland Security.

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NSA trove shows 9:1 ratio of innocents to suspicious people in "targeted surveillance"

NSA data shows that 90 percent of people surveilled are innocent Americans whom the agency is legally prohibited from spying upon. Cory Doctorow looks at what the NSA means when it says "targeted."Read the rest

Germany spy arrested on suspicion of spying for NSA


A 31 year old employee of BND, the German foreign intelligence agency, has been arrested on suspicion of espionage on behalf of the NSA.

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Own your crypto-extremism with the Torrorist tee


Celebrate yesterday's news that the NSA classes all Tor users as "extremists" and targets them for indefinite, deep surveillance...with fashion!

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Edward Snowden to speak at HOPE X NYC


As if there weren't enough reasons to attend HOPE X in NYC this month, now there's a series of killer whistleblower presentations.

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ISPs sue UK spies over hack-attacks


ISPs in US, UK, Netherlands and South Korea are suing the UK spy agency GCHQ over its illegal attacks on their networks in the course of conducting surveillance.

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Seven things you should know about Tor

Tor (The Onion Router) is a military-grade, secure tool for increasing the privacy and anonymity of your communications; but it's been the subject of plenty of fear, uncertainty and doubt.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's 7 Things You Should Know About Tor debunks some of the most common myths about the service (which even the NSA can't break) and raises some important points about Tor's limitations.

7 Things You Should Know About Tor [Cooper Quintin/EFF]

Congress passes anti-mass surveillance amendment with overwhelming support


We did it! The US House of Representatives, under pressure from a mass phone-in campaign, passed an amendment to the Defense Appropriations Bill that prohibits the NSA from using its budget to sabotage Internet security or conduct "backdoor" mass surveillance. The amendment was passed with overwhelming, bipartisan support: 293 ayes, 123 nays, and 1 present. This isn't the end of the long project of reining in the NSA, but it's a very important first step. As a foreigner who isn't entitled to lobby Congress, I extend heartfelt thanks to all my American friends who took the time to call their lawmakers and demand adult supervision and lawful behavior from your out-of-control spies.

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NSA helps foreign governments conduct mass surveillance at home


A new release of Snowden's leaked NSA docs detail RAMPART-A, through which the NSA gives foreign governments the ability to conduct mass surveillance against their own populations in exchange for NSA access to their communications. RAMPART-A, is spread across 13 sites, accesses three terabytes/second from 70 cables and networks. It cost US taxpayers $170M between 2011 and 2013, allocated through the NSA's "black budget."

The NSA makes its foreign partners promise not to spy on the USA using its equipment and in return, agrees not to spy on its partners' populations (with "exceptions"). However, as was documented in Glenn Greenwald's indispensable No Place to Hide, the NSA has a simple trick for circumventing any promises not to spy on its partners' populations.

"No Place to Hide" revealed a list of 33 "third party" countries that assist the NSA in conducting mass surveillance, including Saudi Arabia, Israel, Singapore, Ethiopia, and 15 EU member states. These countries do not allow the NSA to spy on their own countries, but the NSA exploits a loophole to conduct this surveillance anyway: it will strike an agreement with Country A, on one end of a high-speed cable not to spy on it population, and with Country B, on the other end of the cable, not to spy on its population, but will conduct mass surveillance of Country A's communications from Country B and vice-versa.

How Secret Partners Expand NSA’s Surveillance Dragnet [Ryan Gallagher/The Intercept]

CALL CONGRESS NOW, END NSA MASS SURVEILLANCE


If you call your Congressional rep today, we can stop NSA mass surveillance in its tracks. Today, Congress will vote on a critical amendment to the Defense Appropriations Bill: under this amendment, the NSA will be prohibited from using its prodigious budget to conduct mass, warrantless surveillance and to sabotage security standards and technology. This doesn't solve all the surveillance problems, but it's the cleanest, quickest and most plausible way to hamstring NSA spying. The last time this happened, Congress came within seven votes of passing it. The chances are even better now. CALL.

Shut the NSA's Backdoor to the Internet

(Image: I want you to blow the whistle, Mike, )

Germany is NSA's largest listening post, according to new report based on Snowden leaks

A general view of the large former monitoring base of the U.S. intelligence organization National Security Agency (NSA) during break of dawn in Bad Aibling south of Munich, July 11, 2013. Chancellor Angela Merkel has defended Germany's cooperation with U.S. intelligence, dismissing comparisons of its techniques to those used in communist East Germany in an attempt to ease tensions a day before talks on the thorny issue in Washington.   REUTERS/Michael Dalder


A general view of the large former monitoring base of the U.S. intelligence organization National Security Agency (NSA) during break of dawn in Bad Aibling south of Munich, July 11, 2013. Chancellor Angela Merkel has defended Germany's cooperation with U.S. intelligence, dismissing comparisons of its techniques to those used in communist East Germany in an attempt to ease tensions a day before talks on the thorny issue in Washington. REUTERS/Michael Dalder

Using documents leaked by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden, Der Spiegel reports that the NSA has turned Germany into its most important base of operations in Europe. "NSA is more active in Germany than anywhere else in Europe," reports the paper, "And data collected here may have helped kill suspected terrorists."

The German archive provides the basis for a critical discussion on the necessity and limits of secret service work as well as on the protection of privacy in the age of digital communication. The documents complement the debate over a trans-Atlantic relationship that has been severely damaged by the NSA affair.

They paint a picture of an all-powerful American intelligence agency that has developed an increasingly intimate relationship with Germany over the past 13 years while massively expanding its presence. No other country in Europe plays host to a secret NSA surveillance architecture comparable to the one in Germany. It is a web of sites defined as much by a thirst for total control as by the desire for security. In 2007, the NSA claimed to have at least a dozen active collection sites in Germany.

The documents indicate that the NSA uses its German sites to search for a potential target by analyzing a "Pattern of Life," in the words of one Snowden file. And one classified report suggests that information collected in Germany is used for the "capture or kill" of alleged terrorists.

"New NSA Revelations: Inside Snowden's Germany File" [Der Spiegel]

Related:

Possible hidden Latin warning about NSA in Truecrypt's suicide note


When the anonymous authors of the Truecrypt security tool mysteriously yanked their software last month, there was widespread suspicion that they had been ordered by the NSA to secretly compromise their software. A close look at the cryptic message they left behind suggests that they may have encoded a secret clue in the initials of each word of the sentence ("Using TrueCrypt is not secure as it may contain unfixed security issues"), the Latin phrase "uti nsa im cu si" which some claim can be translated as a warning that the NSA had pwned Truecrypt.

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US appeals court rules a warrant is required for cell phone location tracking

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Big news in the fight for security and privacy in the US: the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals this week ruled that a warrant is required for cell phone location tracking.

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