Seeking: "Colossal cannibal great white shark"

Australian scientists are seeking a "mystery sea monster" that likely swallowed a 9-foot great white shark. Most likely, it was an even bigger great white shark, specifically a 2-ton "colossal cannibal great white shark."

Read the rest

Jacques Cousteau's grandson Fabien plans month underwater

NewImageFabien Cousteau, grandson of Jacques, is planning to spend 31 days underwater, beating his grandfather's record by one day while also celebrating Jacques Cousteau's research.

Read the rest

Billionaire tech VC Vinod Khosla owns the very tides, sea, sands (or so he claims)

3249c03da7433fc21c6b746fdc1056b3

Silicon Valley billionaire venture capitalist and Sun Microsystems co-founder Vinod Khosla wants everyone to stay off Martins Beach, a lovely stretch of oceanfront south of Half Moon Bay. To that end, he is invoking The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which ended the Mexican-American War in 1848 and transformed California from being a chunk of Mexico to becoming part of the USA. Okay, Vinod. Whatever.

Read the rest

Deep sea creatures improved with the addition of googly eyes

There's an entire goddamned tumblr of this stuff and it's magnificent. It even includes the actual species of be-googlied sea critter, and source attribution. And it's not even photoshopped! Man, the oceans are amazing. [HT: Theremina]

Read the rest

Breathtaking time-lapse video of marine life

Photographer Daniel Stoupin created this magical time-lapse video of "slow" marine life. "Microworlds: Slow Life"

Dolphin-safe tuna is a danger to other animals

In an older post that I hadn't seen before, David Shiffman of the Southern Fried Science explains how the ostensible success of "dolphin-safe tuna" has actually led to tuna fishing methods that are a much bigger threat to ocean wildlife — from tuna, themselves, to endangered sea turtles and sharks.

Don't be scared of the vampire squid

The name Vampyroteuthis infernalis means "Vampire squid from hell". And vampire squid are freaky looking creatures — red with cloudy eyes that can appear blue or blood red, depending on how the light hits them. But appearances can be deceiving. Turns out, the squid from hell has eating habits more in line with those of Bunnicula. The squids' entire diet is made of "marine snow" — floaty little bits of algae, poop, and bacteria.

Video Link

Why we can't just filter the plastic out of the ocean

One does not simply sail into the Pacific Garbage Patch and clean it up like convicts on the interstate. For one thing, those pieces of plastic are much smaller than you're imagining. For another, when the plastic is that small, any attempt at filtering inevitably sucks up tiny sea life, as well.

The wonders of seahorse biology

Seahorses have prehensile tails, which they use to cling to seagrass like little underwater monkeys. That's just one of the tricks that help make up for the fact that seahorses are some of the slowest swimmers in the animal kingdom. Their eating strategy is based on stealth, not speed.

Image: Longsnout Seahorse (Hippocampus reidi), a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from nostri-imago's photostream

Scientists unearth ancient water in Virginia

Researchers taking a core sample of sediment beneath Cape Charles, Virginia, found something surprising sandwiched between the layers of mud and ooze. Locked inside a rocky layer 5000 feet down, they discovered water — water from the early Cretaceous period.

Seahack: participate in sea exploration!

Digitalfishers large

7331117096 16519308dc c

Five years ago this month, my pal, BB contributor, and IFTF colleague Ariel Waldman created Spacehack, a directory of projects through which anyone can participate in space exploration. It was a very influential endeavor, igniting many people's interest and excitement in space research and how we can all get involved even here on terra firm. Today, Ariel has launched Seahack, a similar site to spur participation in sea exploration! From DIY underwater robots to crowdsourced analysis of deep-sea videos to a project aimed at decoding the language of whales, Seahack is a great way to get your feet wet (sorry) in ocean science even if you're a landlubber like me. Congratulations, Ariel!

Seahack: A Directory of Ways to Participate In Sea Exploration

Autopsy of a sea monster

You've seen the oarfish — the 18-foot-long, serpent-like beastie that washed up on a California beach. Now, tag along with the scientists from the Southwest Fisheries Science Center as they dissect that monster ... a "once in a lifetime fish".

'Rising Seas,' long-form radio doc on climate change by Alex Chadwick and 'BURN: An Energy Journal'

My friend, former NPR colleague, and longtime journalism mentor Alex Chadwick has an incredible new radio documenting hitting the public radio airwaves this week. We're sharing it here on Boing Boing before it hits the radio-waves. I asked Alex to tell us a little about 'Rising Seas.' He explains:

The Rising Seas project grew out of an encounter at an MIT energy seminar almost a year ago. I met an Americanized Brit, Dr. Len Berry, from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton. He's been speaking forcefully and clearly about the threat that rising seas present. At the end of his talk, I asked if Miami is a viable city. He smiled and answered, 'well, it is right now'.

And then I asked about the end of the century. He smiled again, but said nothing.

Read the rest

The myth of the ugly blobfish

Here we have the common Internet blobfish, recently voted World's Ugliest Animal.

But wait! At Smithsonian, Colin Schultz has made a very good case for why the blobfish doesn't deserve its unattractive reputation. This isn't about beauty being subjective (although some might find the above picture more cute than ugly). Instead, it's about atmospheric pressure, and what happens to a fish removed from its natural, deep-sea, high-pressure habitat.

Here is what the blobfish really looks like, before somebody took him to the surface and snapped an embarrassing photo:

Read the rest

Inside James Cameron's sleek sub

Subbbbb

National Geographic posted an exploded view of the Deepsea Challenger, the submersible designed by James Cameron and Ron Allum. This was the sub that Cameron piloted last year to the bottom of Challenger Deep, the deepest known point in Earth's oceans at nearly 36,000 feet. Also seen above is the "pilot's sphere," custom-tailored for Cameron's 6'2" height.

"Deepsea Challenger: Inside the sub"