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Incredibly dirty R&B: gloriously filthy music from the 30s-50s

Glenn sez, "R&B music was pretty bawdy before its entered the era of white appropriation and radio play. Leah Reich, an ethnographer by training and a music lover and singer by love, takes a stroll through some of the filthiest, wonderful era before all this stuff was cleaned up. Tons of links to Youtube videos and other sources."

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Learn to write with William S Burroughs

In 1979, William S Burroughs delivered a series of lectures on creative writing (though he insisted that he was teaching creative reading -- that is, analyzing the writing process by reading, because everyone can be taught to read, but only some will be able to write) at Naropa University. Three of these lectures, running to over four hours, are up on Youtube, covering writing exercises, Brion Gysin, Aleister Crowley, science fiction, General Semantics, and cut-ups. These are excellent listening, and are licensed Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivs-NonCommerical (as is the rest of the Naropa collection.)

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Forgotten Foods: reviving weird old food and figuring out what should be brought back


Meg Favreau writes, "I thought you guys might be interested in this column I've been writing for the last year-ish -- I scour old cookbooks for once-popular recipes that have fallen out of favor, explore the (often weird) history of the food, and provide a recipe. Favorites include Welsh rarebit (the OG bachelor food, cooked in proto-microwave chafing dishes, and known for causing dreams so batshit that Little Nemo creator Winsor McCay did a long-running strip just about rarebit nightmares), beef tea (the chicken soup of its day, which tastes like hamburger water in the best way), and a Halloween about a booklet that juxtaposes candy recipes with testimonials about feminine ills (That ended up being posted on Table Matters' non-food sister site).

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DICE: emulator for hardwired, discrete-circuit games from the 1970s


Since 2007, Adam has been improving DICE, a free/open program that emulates video games from the very dawn of the industry. These games, called "discrete circuit" games, had no CPU; gameplay was determined through hardwired connections between the electronic components (think of games like the Pong system). This has put these games -- like 1975's Crossfire, 1974's Clean Sweep and Wipe Out, and 1974's Pin Pong -- outside the reach of retrogaming emulators like MAME. DICE recreates the electrical circuits with careful precision, aiming to recapture the original play.

A new version of DICE, 0.8, allows for windowed play, and attains some Mac OS support.

adam's emulation wip (via /.)

A truly super Mario doorbell

Joseph "Rawr" Thai's Mario-themed doorbell makes a coin-chime every time its pressed, and increments an LCD counter showing how many coins have been racked up by visitors to the house. Every ten presses, the doorbell plays a 1UP sound, and after 100 presses, it plays a mushroom upgrade chime.

Rawr's got detailed plans for building your own Mario doorbell.

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Zbrush meets the Monster Manual


Patrick Farley, a wonderful comics creator whose work we've been covering for more than a decade, has taken to Twitter to show off his Zbrush recreations of the monsters from the original Dungeons and Dragons Monster Manual. (Thanks, Stefan!)

Marty McFly tee


The screen-printed Marty McFly/Back to the Future tee is $24-30 at Amazon.

Back To The Future Marty McFly Vest Costume Adult Movie T-Shirt Tee (via Geekologie)

Walt Disney's purchase-order for Disneyland's petrified tree

One of the weirdest white-elephants at Disneyland is the petrified tree-stump in Frontierland, which Walt Disney bought after spotting it in Colorado Springs, where resident Jack Baker bought and sold fossils through his company Pike Petrified Forest Fossil. The Colorado Springs Gazette published a scan of Walt Disney's letter to Baker regarding the sale.

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Podcast: Imagineer Rolly Crump on designing the Haunted Mansion


Jeff sez, "On episode 5 of the DoomBuggies Spook Show podcast (MP3), designer Rolly Crump gives a very candid interview in which he talks about his career working on Disneyland's Haunted Mansion with Walt Disney at WED Imagineering, and tells personal stories including the time he spent working with co-tinkerer Yale Gracey designing special effects for the Haunted Mansion, and how he was drummed out of the Haunted Mansion project after Walt died."

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Digitized items from the Carl Sagan archive go live on the Library of Congress site


The Library of Congress has acquired The Seth MacFarlane Collection of the Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan Archive, and has begun to catalog and digitize the materials in it, posting them to the library's website. The scanned materials include Sagan's personal papers, and are divided into three categories: models of the cosmos throughout history; history of the possibility of life on other worlds; Carl Sagan's life and contributions to science and society."

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Model spaceships inspired by classic science fiction paperback covers

Grant Louden is an artist in Milton Keynes who is working on a series of incredible sculptures based on the spaceships from classic sf pulp covers. The first one is Star Dwellers, based on Colin Hay's cover for James Blish's novel. Louden collaborated with Hay on the piece, and officially licensed it. The build is an amazing mix of Fimo, model parts, car body filler, and custom castings in rubber and resin. Needless to say, the detail is fantastic.

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Reflections on keeping a personal home page for 20 years

Justin Hall sez, "My personal web site just turned 20 years old today! I posted a short film to celebrate."

Happy 20 - long time linking (Thanks, Justin!)

Celebrate D&D's 40th: AMA with author of "Playing at the World"


Jayson from Gygax Magazine sez, "This Sunday, January 26th, marks the 40th anniversary of the first publication of Dungeons & Dragons. To mark the occasion, Jon Peterson, author of Playing at the World and writer for Gygax Magazine, will be holding an AMA ("Ask Me Anything") on Reddit."

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No More Road Trips? American road-trip movie made with found home-movie footage

Rogue archivist Rick Prelinger writes, "Last year I finished my archival road movie, No More Road Trips? It's a composite road trip made from my archives of over 10,000 home movies, hoping to ask the question: have we come to the end of the open road? You can read about all that online, but I wanted to point to my 'trailer,' which is 798 high-definition images from the film shown at 12 frames per second. I hope it expresses some of my fascination with the American roadscape, especially as it looked during the down-at-the-heels 1930s and optimistic 1950s-1960s."

(Thanks, Rick!)

Photos from the set of A Clockwork Orange


Here's a roundup of candid on-set photos from 1971's Stanley Kubrick movie A Clockwork Orange.

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