San Franciscans: come to the DNA Lounge for Cyberdelia, see Tank Girl, use the Linux Payphone


JWZ of San Francisco's DNA Lounge writes, "First, I reverse engineered an old payphone and turned it into a Linux computer. This was a ridiculous thing to do and my build log is ridiculous. Second: The reason I did this was to use it as a prop at our next HACKERS party." Read the rest

The Dungeons and Dragons cartoon was better than it had any right to be


The Retroblasting Youtube show -- which covers the 1980s cartoons that were made as 22-minute ads for toys after Reagan removed regulations aimed at protecting children from televised exploitation -- takes an in-depth look at the Dungeons and Dragons cartoon, a rare example of a show from the era that didn't have a toy tie-in. Read the rest

Breaking the DRM on the 1982 Apple ][+ port of Burger Time


4AM is a prolific computer historian whose practice involves cracking the copy protection on neglected Apple ][+ floppy disks, producing not just games, but voluminous logs that reveal the secret history of the cat-and-mouse between crackers and publishers. Read the rest

Help identify the science fiction legends in these thrift-scored pix of the 1956 Worldcon


Cate writes, "I came across a collection of snapshots at a thrift store and recognized the historic nature of the photos, which documented the 14th World Science Fiction Convention. I purchased the photos from a thrift store in Santa Barbara, California on December 31, 2015. I am looking for help to identify attendees featured in the photos." Read the rest

Sears Xmas Wishbook '77: synthetic fabrics, expensive video games, digital watches


Greg Maletic scanned the 1977 Sears Christmas Wishbook, "Amazon, printed out." He presents a guided tour of its highlights, starting with the nascent console game and handheld electronic game industry's top offerings, which, when converted to 2015 dollars, are scorchingly expensive. Read the rest

Giant hats were the cellphones of the silent movie era


Silent movies were preceded by stern/comic etiquette messages reminding viewers to take off their hats before the show, lest they interfere with other viewers' enjoyment. Read the rest

Robert Silverberg's government-funded guide to the psychoactive drugs of sf


In 1974, the US National Institute on Drug Abuse commissioned sf giant Robert Silverberg to research and write Drug Themes in Science Fiction," a survey of 75 sf stories and novels that included fictional psychoactive drugs. Read the rest

Hacker puppets explore the relationship between carbon paper and copyright

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Gus writes, "Remember carbon paper? You’re probably of a certain age if you can recall typing on a sandwich of two sheets of paper with a thin, grimy, black sheet between them to make copies." Read the rest

J Edgar Hoover loved Efrem Zimbalist's "FBI"


Michael from Muckrock writes, "While J. Edgar Hoover wasn't a big fan of much media in the 60s -- he worked to rewrite one of Hitchcock's scripts and made Walt Disney re-work Tomorrowland -- there was one show that struck a chord: ABC's The FBI." Read the rest

The origin story of the Timothy Leary archives


Lisa Rein writes, "Fresh from a Supreme Court victory in a marijuana case, and armed with a campaign song written by John Lennon, maverick psychologist and prominent LSD researcher Timothy Leary decided to run for governor of California in a bid to unseat the incumbent Ronald Reagan, only to be knocked out of the race by a felony conviction and 10-year sentence for possession of two half-smoked marijuana joints, as a symbol of Nixon's newly proclaimed War on Drugs." Read the rest

Menus of the 1850s and 1860s


The Hilton College of the University of Houston's Hospitality Industry Archives includes a wonderful selection of menus from the 1850s and 1860s. Read the rest

Alan Moore's brilliantly bonkers lost 1980s Star Wars comics


Jahfurry writes, "Ben McCool over at Tech Times unearthed five brilliantly bonkers Star Wars comics written by Alan Moore in the '80s. What a treat to read the Magus's take on Darth Vader, Han, Chewie, C-3P0 and the whole crew with great art by Alan Davis, John Stokes (Invisibles) and more UK artists extraoirdinaire... McCool examines each story separately, giddily dissecting the imaginative insanity you'd expect from Moore, while marveling at how these read as classic, albeit odd, Star Wars stories." Read the rest

100 useful tips from a bygone era


The Gallaher How to Do Its were a set of British 100 cigarette cards, each depicting and describing a 19th (?) century life-hack (the collection is undated). Read the rest

What happened to all the Star Trek hair? Shatner didn't take all of it home, did he?


A 1968 memo from Paramount producer Robert Justman to Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry reports on the sad state of the show's hairpieces, which had gone missing in great number. Read the rest

Gallery of the Soviet Union's most desirable personal computers


Starting with the Agat, a 1984 Apple ][+ clone, moving through several other mass-market and semi-mass-market models, including the gorgeously named Robotron, which was mostly produced in the GDR, and the hobbyist Radio-86RK (an 8-bit computer you assembled yourself, a bit like the Altair) and my favorite, the Apogei BK-01 which was as orange as a very, very orange thing. Read the rest

Future Forms: beautifully curated collection of space-age electronics


Mark of Future Forms takes gorgeous photos of his collection of "space-age" electronics from the 1960s to the 1980s, many of which are for sale or rental. You can search by color, brand, or category. I got lost and then found again in "novelty" and then disappeared altogether into "orange." Read the rest

Typewriter portraiture, the strange story of 1920s ASCII art


In 1919, a 16-year old LA Times office boy named Kenneth Taylor was given a back-page spread to show off his typewriter portraits of film stars; Taylor's work then spread to Photoplay, and a new medium was born. Read the rest

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