Make labels like it is 1978

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Want to label things like Mom and Dad did?

I needed a label gun, but I hate the printer-in-your-hands models. What I needed was an old-style click-wheel embossing label maker!

KA-Click! KA-Click!

I remember spending hours as kid making labels with my dad's click wheel embosser! A hard plastic tape runs through a mini-printing press, and you simply squeeze to emboss letters on to it. This click wheel is simple to mash, I remember my parents one as taking Herculean effort.

The tape comes in all sorts of great colors too!

DYMO Organizer Xpress Handheld Embossing Label Maker via Amazon Read the rest

Things Organized Neatly: The Art of Arranging the Everyday

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See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Things Organized Neatly: The Art of Arranging the Everyday by Austin Radcliffe Universe 2016, 104 pages, 7.8 x 10 x 0.8 inches $17 Buy a copy on Amazon

Simply as advertised. Rows and rows of diverse things neatly organized. This process is often called knolling. The applied organizing logic varies: it can be by size, by color, by age; in rows, in grids, in fitted mosaics. The effect is always hypnotic. Seemingly meaningless collections gain intelligence and order which focuses attention on the parts. The book ranges wide and far in the type of things that are inspected. You will soon knoll your own.

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How I store and organize my magic tricks

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I use the Stanley SortMaster Junior Organizer to keep my magic tricks organized. It has removable dividers so I can change the size of the compartments, and you can stack and carry up to three organizers at one. Stanley SortMaster Junior Organizer ($16) on Amazon

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Video of illustrators drawing in the Hobonichi Techo day planner

In September I wrote about the Hobonichi Techo, a cult-favorite Japanese day planner that will soon be made in an English version. Here's a fun video (with happy music) that shows illustrators drawing in copies of the planner. Read the rest

A beloved Japanese day planner goes global

I'd not heard of the Hobonichi Techo day planner until I read this interview with the publisher. An English version is coming out soon and I want one.

[I]n Japan there is one planner that for some years has been gathering a huge following. The Hobonichi Techo. (Techo — pronounced “tetch-oh” — means “handbook”.) One thing that makes it unique is that it is produced by the web media site Hobo Nikkan Itoi Shinbun (or Hobonichi), but more than anything it is the sense of affection and camaraderie it has created amongst its users that has lifted it above the rest: “I use a Hobonichi Techo.” “So do I.” “Me too!” So the conversation goes.

And now, from this autumn, the English version of the Techo, the Hobonichi Planner, is due to go on sale worldwide. Tom Vincent sat down with the editor-in-chief of Hobo Nikkan Itoi Shinbun and the person who created the Hobonichi Techo, Shigesato Itoi, to learn all about how the planner came to be.

Hobonichi Planner going global — PingMag talks to Shigesato Itoi Read the rest

The Library of Congress welcomes our new galactic overlords

The Library of Congress has an official standard for abbreviations of different languages. It's a long list, because, well, there are lots and lots of languages that might be mentioned in the Library of Congress. In fact, the standard is so thorough that it includes Klingon. (Via Hilary Mason) Read the rest