These intricate hand-painted mandala stones reveal the cosmic beauty of math

San Francisco-based artist Lina West creates these beautiful hand-painted mandala stones covered in gorgeous fractal patterns. Read the rest

Getting better at painting gaming miniatures

Many of us who play fantasy and sci-fi roleplaying and tabletop miniature games struggle with our ability to paint minis so that they look halfway decent on the table. Getting me to paint my minis is like getting 8-year-old me to eat his broccoli. I'm something of a perfectionist and I look at a lot of pro painted miniatures, in gaming magazines and online. My miniatures never look as good as what I see, so it's an effort for me to even bother. But also being a perfectionist, I wouldn't think of "gaming in the nude" (playing with unpainted miniatures). And so I press ahead, and try to do at least a little painting every night.

My pal, James Floyd Kelly, who I wrote about previously when he launched his new dungeon crafting channel, Game Terrain Engineering, was in a similar boat of not being happy with his painting chops. So, he decided to buy the Reaper Miniatures Learn To Paint Bones Kit and record a series of videos of him painting the three minis that come in the kit. It's really encouraging to watch the series and to see how much his painting improves over the three videos and three miniatures. Bolstered by that improvement, Jim plans on now getting the next kit in the series, the Layer Up Bones Miniatures Learn to Paint Kit and to paint (and hopefully document) those three miniatures.

Also: Here's a list of beginner painting tips that I ran into recently. These are all of the same tips that I share with people. Read the rest

Watch this thermochromic painting change color

Legacy Lab international created this interesting creative experiment titled Energy of Things: a canvas covered in thermochromic paint, with a variable heat source behind it. Read the rest

Watch how an artist makes gorgeous watercolor patterns

Josie Lewis creates beautiful geometric watercolor paintings. In this video, she shows you how if you're ready to move past adult coloring books. Read the rest

Five hours to kill? Watch a watercolorist paint Legend of Zelda's Link

DeviantArt member Laovaan creates all kinds of beautifully shaded watercolors. In this video he fields viewer questions as he spends five hours creating a watercolor of Link from The Legend of Zelda. Read the rest

Amazing Black Knight hand-painted miniature from 'Kingdom Death' weird horror game

Check out this astonishing workmanship by mulletsaurus, who hand-painted The Black Knight from Kingdom Death. Here's the blank for comparison: Read the rest

My friend Ekundayo, a genius with a paintbrush

I’d like you to meet a man that I've worked with for over a decade.   His artist name is Ekundayo and I'll be darned if I know what else to call him.  He pours his life into his work - it's everything to him.

His painting style style is emotion filled, kinetic, and unforgettable.

I met Ekundayo in 2005 and since then, I’ve seen his work pop up on billboards, in movies and on murals around the globe.  

The content he chooses to create goes beyond our comfort zone, and because of that, it's impossible to mistake his artistic fingerprint.

Each of his art pieces drips with emotion and has amazing stories buried within them.

In 2007, Ekundayo helped our company create a mural for Trent Reznor’s, Year Zero. The piece was painted in London with other artists Johnny Rodriguez, Josh Clay and Mike Maxwell.

Reznor's mural was stolen 2 days after it was completed and to this day, fans around the world are on the lookout for it.

By the time the Year Zero project was complete, Ekundayo had become very special to me and as his technique evolved, I marveled at his ability to quickly fill vast spaces with his unique vision.

I'd love to have a peek at the sketchbook in his head and see the art before it unfolds.

My friend is truly a genius with a paintbrush and you can check out the rest of his work at Ekundayo.com

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Musical feline artbot creates abstract paintings

YouTuber Die Struktur created the first rotating cat automaton that paints to musical accompaniment. Now, instead of "my kid could paint that," idiots can say "my maneki-neko on a turntable could paint that." Read the rest

Birds and other animals painted on feathers

Krystle Missildine paints delicate animal portraits on feathers, like this robin on a macaw feather.

Read the rest

Landscape painting on the cut surface of a treestump

This bucolic scene is a work of art that anyone can attempt—so long as they have an unrooted treestump close to hand and the brilliant skills of Alison Moritsugu. [via r/Art] Read the rest

This is not a wolf. It's three naked women.

Another incredible body painting masterpiece by Johannes Stötter. And just for kicks, take a close look at this "frog":

Want more? Check out the trippy video below (previously posted on BB) and, of course, the artist's site: Johannes Stötter Art

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How to paint the moon on a leather bag (or just order one)

Space artist Alizey Khan painted the moon on a faux-leather bag and will make one just like it for you for just $100. Khan used Angelus leather paints; I can vouch for them as the best I've found, too, both creatively (in that they run and mix like standard acrylics) but have a convincing texture that doesn't crack.

Here's a tutorial she made, too:

Read the rest

Computer paints a "new Rembrandt" and prints it in 3D

The Next Rembrandt is an original portrait created with machine learning algorithms trained using the Dutch master's works. The resulting image isn't a plain old bitmap, either, but a fully three-dimensional artifact built with scans of real paintings' brushstrokes and protrusions.

"We really wanted to understand what makes a face look like a Rembrandt," Emmanuel Flores, director of technology for the project, told the BBC.

After they had been digitally tagged by humans, data on Rembrandt's paintings was gathered by computers which discovered patterns in how the Dutch master would, for example, characteristically shape a subject's eyes in his portraits.

Then, machine-learning algorithms were developed which could output a new portrait mirroring Rembrandt's style.

To limit the many possible results to a specific type of individual, the computer was asked to produce a portrait of a Caucasian male between the ages of 30 and 40, with facial hair, wearing black clothes with a white collar and a hat, facing to the right.

The involvement of human artists in the final work is unequivocally denied: "humans didn't decide the final look and feel of the final portrait - they simply chose algorithms based on their efficiency and let the computer come up with the finished result."

The suggestion of emergent brilliance from the machine, then, is quite exciting. That said, there are an awful lot of Rembrandt portraits in exactly this strictly-composed style – a good place to get started.

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The artist reviving the exquisite techniques of the Old Masters

I was excited to read this article about Jacob Collins, an artist working in the style of the old masters--so many oil glazes!--as it's the effect I often aim for (albeit with ersatz digital shenanigans, though I did receive formal training back in the day). But, at least in James Panero's telling, he seems really humorless and severe about the whole thing. Read the rest

4 artists 1 tree

4 Artists Paint 1 Tree is a short documentary released by Disney in 1958, in which four of its best animators (then working on Sleeping Beauty) each paint the same old oak tree. An illustration of the depth of artistic brilliance and individuality informing the technical uniformity of an animated feature, it's well worth 15 minutes of your day.

They're all great, but my favorite is Eyvind Earle's, top, closely followed by Josh Meador's on the left. To the right, Walt Peregoy ("Walt Disney was a shit. We made Walt. Walt didn’t make Walt. Walt was an asshole.") holds his modernist rendering. At bottom is Mark Davis, whose technique seems delightfully contemporary. [Thanks, Wendy!] Read the rest

See Camille Rose Garcia's mind-blowing new paintings, including a Bowie portrait!

Pop surrealist pioneer Camille Rose Garcia returns to Seattle's Roq La Rue Gallery tonight, March 3, with a magnificent new show of phantasmagoric paintings! This remarkable exhibition, titled "Animus Chrysalis Mortis," hangs until April 2. Garcia says:

For this body of work I was inspired by the surrealist and deeply symbolic films of Alejandro Jodorowsky, Jungian archetypes, and Greek mythology. I created a personal language of symbols, then made a card set and selected at random a different set for each new painting. This method taps into the elements of subconscious influence and chance, as well as mirrors the cut-up method of writing created by one of my favorite authors William Burroughs.

From these subconscious suggestions I created a lush and layered symbolic world that explores the realm of childhood, memory and longing. Ghosts and gardens, snakes and skulls frame fever-dream scenes of wounded goddesses slayed open, fecund gardens growing from their wounds. Vibrant strange gardens populated with insects and dream imagery portray a psychedelic dance between life and death.

Read the rest

The latest from artist Gus Harper

I've always loved sharing artist Gus Harper's work. Regardless if it is time-lapse videos of Gus working, photos our readers have told me ARE safe for work, or just news about a forthcoming show. This time I get to share something special! Gus painted the owl above for me, to fix my living room and get me out of a funk.

Commissioning a piece of art from Gus was a lot of fun! I was reluctant to give him any direction beyond showing him some photos of the wall in question and my living room, but thankfully Gus knew what he was doing. We talked about prior pieces of his that I particularly enjoy and focused on his paintings of Lions. I'm not the only one who loved that series, and one piece was featured in the recent biopic on N.W.A. Straight Outta Compton, decorating Dr. Dre's office.

A lion, however is not the animal for that wall. Gus promptly noted that my shelves, and most every flat surface, were filled with owls that I have collected over the years. Serendipitously, Gus had just painted his first owl, ever, a week or so before, just for fun and was itching to work on a larger piece. Sketches flew back and forth, I changed the color of the wall the painting would sit on, and got a new rug. When Gus' painting showed up, I knew my living room was right... for the time being.

Gus has been up to a lot more than just decorating Hollywood movies, and my home. Read the rest

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