Boing Boing 

Facebook rolls out new encryption features

Reuters


Reuters

An update rolled out today by Facebook allows users to post their public email encryption key on their Facebook profile, so others can encrypt future emails to that user. Here's the official blog post at Facebook.

More at CPJ:

Facebook profiles now have a field for PGP public keys--just like for phone numbers or email addresses. Uploaded keys can be shared as widely or narrowly as desired, just like other information on a Facebook profile. For journalists who use Facebook to connect with sources and disseminate, share, and comment on news, their profile will now indicate they are available for encrypted emails. The new feature will also make it easier to securely contact potential sources.

A sample display of the new encryption feature offered to users by Facebook.


A sample display of the new encryption feature offered to users by Facebook.

"Status update: Facebook users now have access to PGP encryption" and "CPJ welcomes Facebook move to add PGP encryption features" [Committee to Protect Journalists]

"Securing Email Communications from Facebook" [Facebook]

Gnupg needs your support!

Gnu Privacy Guard (GPG, the free/open version of PGP) relies on donations to pay developers to keep the project alive and viable; as one of its millions of users, I am grateful and indebted to the people who keep it alive and that's why I've just donated to the project.

Read the rest

Google announces end-to-end encryption for Gmail (a big deal!)

Google has announced support for end-to-end encryption with Gmail, a major step for privacy and a major blow against mass surveillance. Gmail users who install free and open Chrome plugin will be able to send and receive messages that can only be read by people who have their intended recipients' passphrase, and not Google -- meaning that even if the NSA legally or covertly taps into Google's data-centers, they won't be able to read mail that's encrypted with the End-to-End plugin.

This is marvellous news. There is already support for Gnu Privacy Guard (GPG) and Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) in Gmail, through Firefox plugin or Chrome plugin, but long experience has shown that many people are confused by PGP/GPG in its current state.

What's more, Google has explicitly tied this to the Reset the Net campaign (in which Boing Boing is a partner), a global day commemorating the Snowden leaks and calling for an Internet that is made strong and secure from mass spying.

Read the rest