Hong Kong's Architecture of Density through Michael Wolf's lens

Though he's lived there since 1994, German-born photographer Michael Wolf has only been documenting Hong Kong since 2003. This interview looks at two of his more notable projects: his shots of massive residential high-rises, and the back alleys of the city. Some of the high-rise shots are below: Read the rest

Need a cheap diffuser for your camera flash? Try a white balloon

The Koldunov Brothers put together this simple demonstration of how using a standard white party balloon can give your flash photography a nice diffused look. Read the rest

George Eastman Museum releases a quarter million photographs online

Thanks to an online platform overhauled and reopened last month, visitors can now view hundreds of thousands of images in the George Eastman Museum collection. Works include vintage materials like Eadweard J. Muybridge's famous photographic studies of animal movement and 450 works by Andy Warhol, including this self-portrait. Read the rest

Here's National Geographic's 2016 Nature Photographer of the Year winner

"Sardine Run" by G. Lecoeur edged out a competitive field of remarkable images to take National Geographic's 2016 title. Read the rest

Savor Tom Blachford's full-moon shots of vintage Palm Springs

Australian photographer Tom Blachford found a way to make vintage cars and midcentury modern Palm Springs homes look classic yet strikingly modern: shoot them on long exposures under a full moon. The resulting series, Midnight Modern, is worth checking out. Read the rest

Watch beautiful timelapse cityscapes as evening lights come on

Lights On! is a beautifully shot timelapse of cities as they transition from dusk to lighting up the night. Filmmaker Aaron Keigher includes Boston, Chicago, Las Vegas, New York and all over California. Read the rest

Is that a real Wookie photobombing this group photo?

At r/mildlyinteresting, people are suggesting that's either Chewbacca in the background of this photo posted by Redactor lolarsystem, or the back of a hirsute woman's head. Both are incorrect. It's quite clearly a Bigfoot. Read the rest

Atomic Age ladies of a certain age posing by Christmas trees

Aluminum, mylar, and space-age plastics await you as you take a trip through Christmases past with 43 prime examples of middle aged women posing by their mid-20th century Christmas trees. Apparently, either a dog or a drink was a required accessory. Crème de menthe, anyone? Read the rest

Combophotos: wonderfully surreal photo montages

Stephen McMennamy created this brilliant and delightful series of montages that he calls "Combophotos"! You can see more on his Tumblr and Instagram. Also below, a CNN interview with the artist!

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World's smallest man dancing with his pet cat

As discussed on r/OldSchoolCool, this 1956 photograph depicts either the "world's largest cat dancing with his pet man" or the "world's smallest man dancing with his pet cat."

Further investigation reveals that the fellow is Henry Behrens who at 30 inches tall traveled around with "Burton Lester's Midgets" in the 1950s. Read the rest

Watch 'The Camera Collector', a lovely short film on passion (and high-end vintage camera superfans)

The Camera Collector tells the story of a vintage camera collector who fell in love with cameras in the 1960s, against the wishes of his father. After saving all summer for his first Leica, his father was waiting when he returned home. "When he saw it was a camera, he started punching me."

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Photography: These starscapes may inspire a move to Finland

Finnish photographer Oscar Keserci braved brutal temperatures in and around Kirkkonummi, Finland for his breathtaking Blue Night series of photos.

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Uri Shapira's beautiful formations of crystals and algae

Israeli artist Uri Shapira creates beautiful photos and timelapse videos of chemical reactions and algae growth, generating beautiful patterns that seem otherworldly. Read the rest

Trailcam photos of naked, tripping man who thought he was a tiger

UPDATE: As I had cautioned, The Mirror indeed had its "facts" muddled. According to this October article in Vice, the photos seen here are actually from the woods around the University of Virginia’s Mountain Lake Biological Station. No idea if the fellow was actually tripping or thought he was a Siberian tiger. Shame, as the below story is quite delightful.

Original uncorrected post:

This gentleman from Liberec, Czech Republic was reportedly tripping on LSD to combat depression when he began to hallucinate that he was a Siberian tiger. He then stripped naked and pursued imaginary prey for miles along the Czech-Poland border where he was spotted on trailcams. According to the Mirror, "police said that, because the man did not have any drugs with him, he was only fined and will not face any further charges."

If this story is true, I hope the fellow had fun and that the experience alleviated his depression.

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Kodachrome, Pt. 2

This week on HOME: Stories From L.A.:

Who were we? How did we live, and what did it look like? The vast archive of castoff slides captures, in vivid colors, images of the American family at midcentury. But the stories that go with the pictures are most often lost, and we’re left to create our own, and reflect on millions of conscious decisions to untie the knot of memory.

HOME is a member of the Boing Boing Podcast Network. If you like what you hear, please take a second to leave the show a rating and/or review at the iTunes Store. It's a little thing that means a lot, so thanks. And don't forget to subscribe, at any of the usual places:

iTunes | Android | Email | Google Play | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS Read the rest

Wonderfully clever graffiti that interacts with the structures where it's painted

Fantastic work from Italian street art collective Collettivo FX.

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A beautiful ghost rainbow

Landscape photographer Melvin Nicholson captured this stunning shot of a ghost rainbow, aka white rainbow or fog bow, in Rannoch Moor north of Glasgow, Scotland.

Like rainbows, fogbows are caused by sunglight reflecting off water drops. However, as NASA explains:

The fog itself is not confined to an arch -- the fog is mostly transparent but relatively uniform.The fogbow shape is created by those drops with the best angle to divert sunlight to the observer. The fogbow's relative lack of colors are caused by the relatively smaller water drops. The drops active above are so small that the quantum mechanical wavelength of light becomes important and smears out colors that would be created by larger rainbow water drops acting like small prisms reflecting sunlight.

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