Boing Boing 

A thing that is real: “Great Job! Poop Emoji Dog Poop Bags”

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“You did it! Percival Peristalsis, the Positive Poop is proud of you.”

Great Job! Poop Emoji Dog Poop Bags are here, and we want them.

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Shower Game will not make you feel clean at all

shower-game

Ever pooped in the shower? If you play Shower Game, you probably will.

This bizarre interactive take on morning water rituals was created by Increpare—otherwise known as Stephen Lavelle—a developer best known for releasing small, free, very weird game experiences, and Shower Game is no exception.

It takes place entirely (to my knowledge) inside a shower, where you find yourself standing naked, surrounded by bottles of bizarre personal products. Most of the fun revolves around picking up and playing with them to see what they do; one gel toggles on "sexy hair," while a bottle of an undefined substance reverses gravity.

And of course, there's the poop, which you can jam down the drain, or launch outside the shower to potentially interesting effect. If that sounds appealing to you, Shower Game awaits, as do over 200 other games on Increpare's website.

With its sonar-reflective leaves, this carnivorous plant is saying to bats “please poop on me.”

National Geographic


National Geographic

Science writer Ed Yong has fun with poop and bats and flesh-eating plants of the Pacific in this piece for NatGeo.

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You could totally grub down some Poop Bread right now

https://clarsmisadventures.wordpress.com/2012/04/

When we visited Taipei, my wife and I made it our singular goal to eat at Modern Toilet, even though we knew the bathroom-themed restaurant had caught on and was a bit of a tourist trap. That same spirit has been reignited in me, and my next trip to Seoul cannot come soon enough. I will not leave that city until I grab me some fresh, hot Poop Bread.

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Secret history of the poop emoji


The 2007 project to bring emoji to Android -- and thence to the Web -- involved an epic battle over the inclusion of the much-loved "pile of poop" emoji, whose significance to the Japanese market was poorly understood by various reactionary elements at Google.

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Uncle Sam will defend your stake in any unclaimed bird-poop


If you discover an island covered in guano -- old poop -- an 1856 Federal law that's still on the books obliges the US of A to defend your claim to it.

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Dog invades soccer pitch, poops on it

Good boy! [via Arbroath]

Dogs poop in line with Earth's magnetic field

A paper in Frontiers in Zoology claims that dogs can sense the Earth's magnetic field, and preferentially align to it when pooping. (via Sean Bonner)

How big was a T. Rex turd?

If paleoeschatologist Karen Chin is right, then the 2.4 liter fossilized fecal mass she found Saskatchewan could have been the work of a Tyrannosaurus Rex.

Interactive 3D poop models to help kids characterize their doody

Lil sez, "Some doctors decided that it would help kids describe their poop accurately if they turned the verbal Bristol Stool Scale ('type 1 as 'rabbit droppings', type 2 as 'bunch of grapes', type 3 as 'corn on cob', type 4 as 'sausage', type 5 as 'chicken nuggets', type 6 as 'porridge', and type 7 as 'gravy'.') into 3D models, complete with clear resin 'toilet water'and a porcelain toilet to display them. Because how else would the kids differentiate floaters from sinkers?"

Warning, plastic poop below.

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A proper Victorian poop table

This table is not for pooping. It's for tea. But it is made of poop — specifically fossilized hunks of fish poop, encased in a crunchy shell of clay and rock. The fossilized poops — called coprolites, which is basically just fancy Latin for "fossilized poop" — are the spiny-looking bits in the center of each circular inlay on the table top. (Technically, the name translates as "dung stone".)

The table belonged, appropriately, to the Rev. William Buckland, the man who gave coprolites their fancy name and proved that they were, in fact, fossilized poops.

The table resides at England's Lyme Regis Museum. You can read more about Buckland's work and the details of the craftsmanship and restoration behind the table at their website. Earth Magazine also has a lovely article on coprolites, including important information that will help you distinguish between fossilized poop and stuff that just looks like fossilized poop.

Via The Earth Story. Thanks to my Dad for forwarding this to me!

HOWTO synthesize poop for turd-transplants with a robotgut


University of Guelph researcher Emma Allen-Vercoe and her team have devised a method for creating artificial poop for use in fecal transplants, a promising therapy for people whose intestinal flora have been damaged by illness, antibiotics, or other therapies. The recipe involves a combination of indigestible cellulose and a starter culture of fecal bacteria. These are mixed in an airtight chamber and passed through a "robogut" -- a mechanical analog of the human digestive system that produces the finished turd.

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Just look at this banana-toilet tutorial.


Just look at it.

Kitchen Fun With My 3 Sons: Potty Training Fruit Snack & Other Potty Treats! (Thanks, Teapot!)

Astronauts debate provenance of turd floating in Apollo 10


A declassified mission transcript from Apollo 10 (PDF) includes a passage in which the spacemen argue about whose turd is floating weightlessly through the capsule.

(Thanks, Fipi Lele!)

How the Russians pee in space

I don't know if I can fully define human nature, but I'm pretty sure it includes a prurient and/or practical interest in how one uses the bathroom under strange circumstances. Thus, the various videos you've seen over the years explaining how astronauts use the toilet on board the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. Until a recent visit to Seattle's Museum of Flight, however, I'd never seen how cosmonauts do their business — an issue with increasingly broad reach, now that Americans and other international space voyagers are being ferried into the heavens aboard Soyuz.

The Soyuz toilet does not look much like the ones on board the Shuttle or the ISS. Those are recognizably toilets, for one thing. The Soyuz sanitary unit is more akin to peeing into a soda bottle in the back seat of the family station wagon — if that soda bottle were hooked up to a vacuum cleaner.

This video — kindly shared with us by The Museum of Flight — was filmed in 2009 by NASA astronaut Michael Barratt. It features the urination demonstration talents of spaceflight adventurer Charles Simonyi and Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka. Please note that this video only demonstrates how the "part Number 1" works — and even that really only seems to apply to gentlemen cosmonauts. As best I can tell, women apparently just pee into something akin to a compact diaper or sanitary pad. (Fun!) As for "part Number 2", here is how it was described in a 2007 NASA publication written by James Lee Broyan, Jr.:

For fecal collection, a porous bag is placed in the receptacle. Once defecation is complete, the bag is removed, placed sequentially in three bags, and then placed in a wet trash compartment. Based on personal conversations with АСУ trainers, urine collection is acceptable but fecal use is avoided if at all possible with the crew using diet restrictions and preventive measures prior to flight.

• Read the 2007 NASA publication comparing different space toilet systems. Apparently, part Number 2 has also been used by female cosmonauts to dispose of menstrual waste.
• Read a description on the RuSpace site, which gives a little more detail on part Number 2.
• Watch the video at YouTube

Thanks to Ted Huetter at The Museum of Flight!

Everybody poops — even the FDA

At Scientific American, Beth Mole has a longer story about the FDA's recent decision to exert more control over the use of fecal transplants — procedures that attempt to cure disorders related to gut bacteria by, essentially, giving you somebody else's gut bacteria. We already talked briefly about this decision, which has some benefits and some detriments. This new piece gets more in-depth.