Boing Boing 

EFF's 25th Anniversary Party with me and Wil Wheaton: July 16/SF


It's been a quarter-century since the Electronic Frontier Foundation was founded by John Perry Barlow, John Gilmore, and Mitch Kapor, and we're celebrating!

Read the rest

How the NSA searches the world's intercepted private communications


XKEYSCORE is a secret NSA program that indexes data slurped up from covert fiber-taps, hacked systems, and smartphones, including "full take" data and metadata.

Read the rest

Why companies that promise not to sell your data can sell it anyway

pegasus rebate

It's all in the fine print: the deal is altered when bankruptcy or a similar corporate shakeup takes place. Then details you've let them know about you might end up on the block.

Read the rest

Not just Germany: the NSA has been spying on France's leaders since at least 1995

A new release of top secret NSA docs by Wikileaks shows the US spy-agency has intercepted the phone conversations of the past three French presidents, the French ambassador to the USA, and others.

Read the rest

The snitch in your pocket: making sense of Stingrays


If you've been struggling to make sense of the stories about Stingrays (super-secretive cellular surveillance tech used by cops and governments) (previously) this week's Note to Self podcast does the best job I've yet seen (heard) of explaining them.

Read the rest

Privacy activists mass-quit U.S. government committee on facial recognition privacy

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration is trying to work out the rules for facial recognition -- whether and when cameras can be put in public places that programatically identify you as you walk past and then save a record of where you've been and who you were with.

Read the rest

The Internet may not be the question, but it's the answer


My latest Guardian column looks at the fiction and reality of "Internet Utopianism," and the effect that a belief in the transformative power of the Internet has had on movements, companies, and norms.

Read the rest

US Government Office of Personnel Management has a second, much worse breach


The second attack is being blamed on Chinese state actors, and it netted the archives of Standard Form 86, which records applicants' mental illnesses, drug and alcohol use, past arrests and bankruptcies and lists of contacts and relatives.

Read the rest

Anti-surveillance steamroller still rolling through Congress

The USA Freedom Act set the first legal limits on spying in a generation, and were immediately followed by 3 more surveillance-blocking amendments from the House, and now, a week later, there's 2 more bipartisan curbs on surveillance.

Read the rest

Radio Shack bankruptcy update: most customer data will be destroyed, not sold to pay creditors

giphy (5)

When electronics retailer Radio Shack filed for bankruptcy, the chain proposed selling customers' personal data to raise cash and repay creditors. That's not gonna happen, and the news is seen as a win for the right to privacy.

Read the rest

If the FBI has a backdoor to Facebook or Apple encryption, we are less safe

Reuters


Reuters

Freedom of the Press Foundation director Trevor Timm tells Boing Boing,

Now that the USA Freedom Act is out of the way, it seems pretty clear the next battle in Congress will almost certainly be over encryption, as the FBI has not stopped its push to force tech companies to insert a backdoor into their communications tools, despite being ridiculed for it by security experts. The FBI seems to push it even farther in the past week, testifying before Congress that they need to stop encryption "above all else" and leaking a story to the LA Times about ISIS using encrypted text messaging apps. I wrote about what a dumb move it is on several levels for the Guardian.

Read the rest

Internet users care about their privacy but have given up on safeguarding it

It's not a fair trade, and everyone knows it.Read the rest

Why do we give away personal data on the internet? Because we've given up.

surrender

The companies that collect all our personal data, hold them forever, and shamelessly use them for their own profit want us to believe that we get something in return. Why else would we just hand them over?

A new Penn study of 1500 Americans concludes that we give online companies our personal info because we are resigned to them eventually getting it all anyway:

"...people feel they cannot do anything to seriously manage their personal information the way they want.  Moreover, they feel they would face significant social and economic penalties if they were to opt out of all the services of a modern economy that rely on an exchange of content for data. So they have slid into resignation.”

Divining the capabilities of the FBI's ubiquitous spy aircraft


The FBI has filled the skies of America's cities with covert aircraft, crisscrossing overhead, bristling with sensors and cloaked in mystery, from the shell companies that own them to the obfuscated tail-numbers they sport.

Read the rest

Edward Snowden, two years later: the world rejects surveillance

Writing in the NYT, Snowden celebrates the second anniversary of his disclosures by celebrating the "profound difference" in the surveillance debate since then.

Read the rest

House easily passes further anti-surveillance amendments


The USA Freedom Act was a very timid curb on surveillance powers, but it was also the first time since the 1970s that Congress limited spies' powers -- and it won't be the last.

Read the rest

There was a David Cameron who swallowed a fly...

In my latest Guardian column, I talk about the real danger from the UK Tories' plan to ban effective cryptography: not the initial mandate forcing companies to help spy on their users, but all the things we'll have to do when that doesn't work.

Read the rest