Boing Boing 

Do Not Track: revolutionary mashup documentary about Web privacy

Brett "Remix Manifesto" Gaylor tells the story of his new project: a revolutionary "mashup documentary" about privacy and the Web.Read the rest

Librarians: privacy's champions


Libraries have always been places where people gathered for intellectual inquiry, where communities could form around emerging ideologies that challenged the status quo.

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What did the courts just do to NSA spying?


When a panel of federal judges from the Second Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the NSA's bulk-phone records spying program was illegal, it was a legal game-changer, but what, exactly, does it all mean?

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Appeals Court rejects NSA's bulk phone-record collection program


A panel of judges from the Second Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the NSA's mass phone-record collection program was not authorized by Congress in the Patriot Act.

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Encryption backdoors are like TSA luggage-locks for the Internet

In my new Guardian column, I look at UK Prime Minister David Cameron's election pledge to eliminate strong crypto and point out that we already have a forerunner of this in the "TSA-safe" luggage locks -- and it's a disaster.

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Telescreen watch: Vizio adds spyware to its TVs


If you own a Vizio TV that's updated recently, beware: its firmware adds "Smart Interactivity," a cute name for spyware that records your viewing choices and inserts additional "bonus features" (ads) into your viewing.

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FBI's crypto backdoor plans require them to win the war on general purpose computing


The FBI wants backdoors in all your crypto, and UK Prime Minister David Cameron made backdoors an election promise, but as Stanford lawyer/computer scientist Jonathan Mayer writes, there's no way to effectively backdoor modern platforms without abolishing the whole idea of computers as we know them, replacing them with an imaginary and totalitarian computing ecosystem that does not exist and probably never will.

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Uncovering sexual preferences by data-mining sex-toy sales [NSFW]


UK sex-toy retailer Lovehoney allowed researcher Jon Millward to data-mine its huge database of over 1,000,000 sex-toy purchases and 45,000 reviews, in order to see what he could infer about Britons' sexual proclivities from the things they bought.

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Fiction: Someone to Watch Over Me

Amala's got a new job: monitoring paroled prisoners' CCTV feeds. What she sees isn't nearly so disturbing as who sees her seeing it. A tale of science fictional horror from the new Black Candies - Surveillance.Read the rest

Surveillance self-defense kit for LGBTQ youth


The latest addition to the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Surveillance Self-Defense series is a set of tools and instructions aimed specifically at LGBTQ kids, who have unique threat models (being outed) and adversaries (homophobic friends, parents, pastors).

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NSA-proof passwords


The Intercept's Micah Lee explains how to use Diceware's to generate a passphrase that can survive the NSA's trillion-guess-per-second cracking attempts -- but which can still be easily memorized.

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Top homeland security Congressjerk only just heard about crypto, and he doesn't like it


Rep John Carter [R-TX] chairs Homeland Security Appropriations and sits on Defense subcommittees, but he only found out that encryption exists when FBI Director James Comey gave bizarre congressional testimony about the coming Bad Times if we're allowed to know about math.

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As crypto wars begin, FBI silently removes sensible advice to encrypt your devices


The FBI used to publish excellent advice about encrypting your devices to keep your data secure when your stuff is lost or stolen; this advice has been silently dropped now that FBI Director James Comey is trying to stop manufacturers from using crypto by default.

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Australia outlaws warrant canaries


The exceptionally broad new surveillance bill lets the government do nearly unlimited warrantless mass surveillance, even of lawyer-client privileged communications, and bans warrant canaries, making it an offense to "disclose information about the existence or non-existence" of a warrant to spy on journalists.

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Bankrupt Radio Shack will sell the customer data they promised to keep private


They were the first company to dabble in a laughably crude version of the surveillance business-model, aggressively collecting your address every time you bought batteries so they could get into the direct-mail racket.

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How Harper's "anti-terror" bill ends privacy in Canada


Michael Geist writes, "Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper is fast-tracking a bill that eviscerates privacy protections within the public sector that represents the most significant reduction in public sector privacy protection in Canadian history -- he' blocking the Privacy Commissioner of Canada from appearing as a witness at the committee studying the bill."

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A conversation about privacy and trust in open education

For Open Education Week, Jonathan Worth convened a conversation about privacy and trust in open education called Speaking Openly in which educators and scholars recorded a series of videos responding to one another's thoughts on the subject.

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