Boing Boing 

Humble Star Wars Bundle with Dark Horse


Name your price for great Star Wars comics in Dark Horse's first-ever DRM-free foray, and support the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund!

Get 2600's archives from 1987

Emmanuel Goldstein from 2600 Magazine writes, "Volume 4 of The Hacker Digest has been put into PDF format, comprised of issues of 2600 Magazine from 1987."

This was the first year that 2600 adopted the digest format. For the first time ever, a hacker magazine would show up on newsstands and in bookstores around the world. New concepts such as cellular phone fraud and electronic mailboxes for $20 a month were introduced to the public and scrutinized in the pages of 2600, while traditions like the letters section, payphone photos, and 2600 meetings were in their infancy. The hacker spirit from these early issues is remarkably similar to that of today: defiant, curious, and overflowing with data.

VOLUME 4 OF THE HACKER DIGEST RELEASED ALONG WITH DETAILS ON ITS HISTORY

(Thanks, Emmanuel!)

Scott Westerfeld's Afterworlds

Scott Westerfeld’s latest novel, Afterworlds is a book about a teenager who’s just sold her first book. It’s a story-within-a-story, and it works brilliantly. Cory Doctorow unpacks the nesting tales of Darcy Patel and Elizabeth Scofield.

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4,000 more DRM-free comics now available on Comixology

Following on the Amazon division's July announcement that publishers could sell their work without DRM on its platform, a huge collection of publishers have signed up to participate: IDW Publishing, Valiant Entertainment, Oni Press, Fantagraphics Books, Aspen Comics, Action Lab Entertainment, Th3rd World Studios, A Wave Blue World, Blind Ferret Entertainment, Caliber Comics, Creative Impulse Entertainment, Devil’s Due Entertainment, GT Labs Comics and Kingstone Media.

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Free Di Filippo story inspired ancient Italian city of Matera


Author Paul Di Filippo did a residency for Matera, a legendary, ancient Italian city and wrote "Chasing the Queen of Sassi" based on his experience of the region.

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Alan Moore's finished a one million word epic novel

The creator of Watchmen, From Hell, V for Vendetta; zinester; defender of libraries; wizard; battler of Big Comics and pornographer has finished the first draft of a novel set loosely in Northampton, a kind of fictionalized memoir of Moore's family -- no publication date yet, and it's likely to come out in three volumes. CAN'T WAIT.

(Image: Alan Moore, Nikki Tysoe, CC-BY)

Kickstarting Skyliner; a graphic novel memoir about jazz behind the Iron Curtain


At 81, Polish illustrator Andre Krayewski has adapted his memoir about being a jazz fan in Stalinist Poland into a graphic novel, and his son Ed has translated it to English.

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Guardian rolls out memberships and a physical space for members


The 200-year-old nonprofit newspaper has turned the gorgeous 19th century railroad goods shed opposite their King's Cross office into an event space, and members can attend stellar, intimate events with Vivienne Westwood, Russell Brand, Jimmy Page, Naomi Klein and more.

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Kickstarting A is for Zebra, subversive alphabets by Crap Hound's Sean Tejaratchi


It's a twisted, genius alphabet book in the style of Tejaratchi's (more) wonderful found-art collage zine Crap Hound, and published by the brilliant Portland zine store Reading Frenzy; $20 gets you your own copy.

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Stellar bargains at Top Shelf Comix's $3 sale!

One of the world's great and indispensible indie comix publishers (League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Lost Girls, Nemo, From Hell, March, Essex County, Swallow Me Whole, etc) selling huge amounts of inventory at deep discounts, with 125 titles for $1-$3, and for over 180 titles, you can get the digital comic thrown in for just a dollar or two more. (Thanks, Chris!)

Amazon vs Hachette is nothing: just WAIT for the audiobook wars!


In my latest Locus column, Audible, Comixology, Amazon, and Doctorow’s First Law, I unpick the technological forces at work in the fight between Amazon and Hachette, one of the "big five" publishers, whose books have not been normally available through Amazon for months now, as the publisher and the bookseller go to war over the terms on which Amazon will sell books in the future.

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Kickstarting Chris Locke's book of post-it note portraits

Christopher Locke (modern fossils, TSA confiscation sculptures, adult coloring book) sez, "I want to hand-draw a few hundred portraits on Post-It Notes, then compile them into a book, so I'm asking people to buy the portraits in order to fund the project: $25 gets you hand-drawn likeness of yourself, arriving in the mail and suitable for framing. The process will help me in teaching middle-schoolers about dedication to long-term projects."

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The Economist defends America's enslavement of Africans


When The Economist reviewed The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism, its anonymous reviewer condemned it, sticking up for America's legacy of slavery as a means of wealth creation, saying "Mr Baptist has not written an objective history of slavery; almost all the blacks in his book are victims, almost all the whites villains -- this is not history; it is advocacy."

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Free ebook of Joe Hill's Heart Shaped Box for owners of the print book


Peter from Bitlit writes, "Best selling author Joe Hill (son of Stephen King) has made his acclaimed horror novel Heart-Shaped Box available as a free eBook bundle. For the next two weeks anybody with a hardcover or paperback is eligible for a free ebook through Bitlit."

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Open Intellectual Property Casebook: free, superior alternative to $160 textbook


James Boyle and Jennifer Jenkins, eminent copyright scholars at the Duke Center for the Public Domain, have released their 788-page Open Intellectual Property Casebook as a free, open, CC-licensed download, replacing textbooks that normally sell for $160 (you can get a hardcopy is $24); it's not just a cheaper alternative, either -- it's a better one, enlivened with sprightly writing, excellent illustrations (including comics in the vein of Boyle and Jenkins's Bound By Law).

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Henry Kuttner: long-lost works of a Lovecraft acolyte

Kuttner met his wife, the writer CL Moore, through a mutual correspondence with HP Lovecraft; when he died, she became his literary executor, then married a non-writer who ordered her to stop writing, and insisted that she suppress future publication of Kuttner's work -- but now you can get 14 of his books as ebooks.

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Harpercollins Humble Ebook Bundle with Gaiman, Bujold, Coelho, Williams, and more

Name your price for more than 12 DRM-free books from Harpercollins, support charity, and strike a blow for freedom!

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Crowdfunding a print edition of Holdfast science fiction magazine

Laurel writes, "Holdfast magazine (a free, online speculative fiction magazine) has launched a fundraising campaign for our first-ever print anthology."

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Canada's On Spec magazine crowdfunding after grant is cut

On Spec, Canada's leading science fiction magazine, faces closure after its Canada Council grant was abruptly, unfairly cancelled. They're raising funds to keep going.

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Comixology adds DRM-free option! Excelsior!

Unlike some of its stablemates, the Amazon-owned comics platform is to allow authors and publishers to distribute their work without the shackles of proprietary rights-management, writes Cory Doctorow

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Harpercollins will offer discounted ebooks to print book owners

They're the first major publisher to sign with Bitlit, an app that lets you send a photo of your book's copyright page with your name inked on it in exchange for a deal on the ebook.

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DRM-free indie ebooks outsell DRM-locked ones 2:1


Author Earnings has published its latest eye-popping data-analysis of ebook sales and rankings on Amazon.

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Jeff VanderMeer's name-your-price bundle of great, indie New Weird fiction


Jeff VenderMeer has curated a name-your-price bundle of New Weird fiction of great repute and deep weirdness, hosted at Storybundle.

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Name your price for 11 books in the Humble Science Fiction Bundle

The latest Humble Ebook Bundle focuses on science fiction, with name-your-price DRM-free ebooks from Harlan Ellison, Elizabeth Ann Scarborough, Dan Simmons, Buzz Aldrin and more.

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Humble Dynamite Bundle: name your price for $258 worth of comics


The Humble Bundle Dynamite 10th Anniversary edition features $258 worth of comics on a name-your-price basis, and supports charities including the indispensable Comic Book Legal Defense Fund.

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Kickstarting a Lovecraftian game where the object is to stay sane and alive

Labratory's kickstarting a new game: "Shadows of Arkham," which is pure Lovecraftian Ameri-trash for people who know that you can't fight the Elder Gods, but you might be able to avoid mind-death if you're quick enough.

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Kickstarting a Progress City book of Disney history articles

The excellent Disney history blog Progress City is kickstarting a book of its best articles, including several that are substantially rewritten and polished for the project. $15 gets you a PDF, $30 for a paperback.

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Publishers offer free/discounted ebooks of the print books you own with Bitlit


Bitlit works with publishers to get you free or discounted access to digital copies of books you own in print: you use the free app (Android/Ios) to take a picture of the book's copyright page with your name printed in ink, and the publisher unlocks a free or discounted ebook version. None of the Big Five publishers participate as yet, but indies like O'Reilly, Berrett-Koehler, Red Wheel Weiser, Other Press, Greystone, Coach House, Triumph, Angry Robot, Chicago Review, Dundurn, and PM Press (publishers of my book The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow) are all in.

(Image: Bookshelf, David Orban, CC-BY)

Podcast: How Amazon is holding Hachette hostage

Here's a reading (MP3) of my latest Guardian column, How Amazon is holding Hachette hostage, which examines how Hachette's insistence on DRM for their ebooks has taken away all their negotiating leverage with Amazon, resulting in Amazon pulling Hachette's books from its catalog in the course of a dispute over discounting:

Under US law (the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act) and its global counterparts (such as the EUCD), only the company that put the DRM on a copyrighted work can remove it. Although you can learn how to remove Amazon's DRM with literally a single, three-word search, it is nevertheless illegal to do so, unless you're Amazon. So while it's technical child's play to release a Hachette app that converts your Kindle library to work with Apple's Ibooks or Google's Play Store, such a move is illegal.

It is an own-goal masterstroke. It is precisely because Hachette has been so successful in selling its ebooks through Amazon that it can't afford to walk away from the retailer. By allowing Amazon to put a lock on its products whose key only Amazon possessed, Hachette has allowed Amazon to utterly usurp its relationship with its customers. The law of DRM means that neither the writer who created a book, nor the publisher who invested in it, gets to control its digital destiny: the lion's share of copyright control goes to the ebook retailer whose sole contribution to the book was running it through a formatting script that locked it up with Amazon's DRM.

The more books Hachette sold with Amazon DRM, the more its customers would have to give up to follow it to a competing store.

MP3

Collaborating with your kids: the story of "A Dark and Dismal Flower"

JC Herz and her five year old daughter, Eve, created A Dark and Dismal Flower, a beautifully-animated picture book. In this essay, Herz offers her advice on how to collaborate with your own kids.

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