Memory Palace podcast about a Confederate monument honoring a real racist


Nate DiMeo, host of the always excellent Memory Palace podcast, points us to the new episode "about the history of the Nathan Bedford Forrest monument (and Confederate monuments in general) that the city of Memphis is planning on moving from a prominent place downtown to a nearby cemetery, because Forrest was, essentially, a racist monster."

The Memory Palace: Episode 73 Read the rest

Pointer Sister's collection of terrible and important black memorabilia


Anita Pointer, vocalist for famed 1980s R&B group The Pointer Sisters, is also a major collector of black memorabilia, from racist caricature cookie jars and mechanical banks to slave shackles and disturbing children’s books like Ten Little Niggers and Little Black Sambo. Read the rest

The US Civil War was fought over slavery


Why did the South fight? Why does this question remain controversial? Read the rest

Busting the myth that the Civil War was about "states' rights"


Confederate Flag wavers claim the the Civil War was all about "states' rights," not slavery. But in this video Colonel Ty Seidule, head of the history department at the US Military Academy at West Point, offers plenty of evidence that this isn't the case. For example, Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens wrote "Our new government was founded on slavery." And slave states were happy to bow to federal law when it benefited them:

From Vox:

Mississippi once complained that New York's notion of states' rights was too strong — because it prevented Mississippi slaveowners from bringing their slaves up North. This war wasn't about the principle of federal power; it was about the threat that the federal government might eventually use that power to abolish slavery.

Ultimately, Seidule's point boils down to something very simple: Be honest. Americans should be able to admit that a huge part of the country was devoted to slavery, so much so that they were willing to die for it. But at the same time, Americans should be proud that their government waged a war to end slavery.

"It is to America's everlasting credit that it fought the most devastating war in its history in order to abolish slavery," Seidule concludes. "As a soldier, I am proud that the United States Army — my army — defeated the Confederates."

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Lowe's replaced black driver with white one at customer request


Marcus Bradley, a driver for hardware store Lowe's, was ordered to hand off a delivery to a racially-acceptable colleague following a customer complaint, reports WSET.

“Then I got a phone call on the phone telling me to bring the delivery back. Saying that I couldn’t do the delivery,” said Bradley to WSET. “I asked him why I couldn’t do it and he said because you’re black and they don’t want you at the house.”

Raw Story found the customer and reports that she has no regrets. She did, however, offer the perfect one-liner from the point where racism and privilege meet.

“I got a right to have whatever I want and that’s it,” she said.

It's not Lowe's first rodeo. In 2011, it conspicuously pulled its ads from the show "All-American Muslim," after a conservative group described it as a "danger to American liberties and traditional values."

After WSET exposed its latest act of conspicuous public bigotry, Lowe's found someone to fire: the store manager.

Diversity and inclusion is a core value at Lowe's. The situation brought to our attention was troubling and an investigation was immediately undertaken. Under no circumstances should a discriminatory delivery request be honored as it is inconsistent with our diversity and inclusion core values and the request should have been refused. The investigation has concluded and the individuals involved are no longer with company.

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#BlackLivesMatter activists are monitored by U.S. Homeland Security and cybersecurity firms

Image: Wikipedia.
In a Reddit AMA, activists DeRay McKesson, Johnetta Elzie and ACLU’s Nus Choudhury talked policing and police reform in America, and surveillance of activists.

Carry the frustration of injustice in this game about racist police violence

Akira Thompson's striking work challenges one of the biggest misconceptions about police violence against black people in America, and offers privileged players the chance to experience the truth.

Privatized, for-profit immigration detention centers force detainees to work for $1-3/day

"We have a name for locking people up and forcing them to do real work without wages. It's called slavery." Read the rest

Top Gear team moves to Amazon


Jeremy Clarkson who finally got himself fired by physically attacking a BBC producer, is moving to Amazon. There, the racist buffoon will be joined by symbiotes Richard Hammond and James May. The new show, as yet unnamed, will air on Amazon Prime in 2016. Read the rest

American cities more ethnically diverse, but not well-integrated

A makeshift memorial is seen near the site where unarmed teen Michael Brown was shot dead in Ferguson, Missouri (Reuters / Adrees Latif)

Racial segregation is not a thing of the past, writes Alana Semuels, and is in fact increasing in many American communities. White Flight never ended.

“Ferguson became recognized as a ‘black suburb’ that could be distinguished from other nearby suburban communities that made different zoning and administrative decisions,” the authors write. … On the flip side, white communities make decisions that keep minorities out. Exclusionary zoning laws make it difficult to build mixed-income housing or apartment buildings in some towns, despite court cases seeking to make cities more diverse. These housing policies mean that cities compete for different types of people, and by banning apartment buildings or affordable housing, cities can better attract affluent white taxpayers.
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"Redneck" talks about racism


A "redneck" explains racism and privilege for the benefit of anyone listening. The message is sound, but the delivery ain't quite right, even if the accent is spot-on: it's an actor playing a character.

Read the rest

Why "All Lives Matter" instead of "Black Lives Matter" is such a stupid thing to say

Image: Wikipedia.
This is a great Reddit thread.

Sousaphone turns KKK rally into party


A sousaphonist added the most fitting soundtrack to this Ku Klux Klan rally. Read the rest

Ellen Pao: “The trolls are winning.”


“I have just endured one of the largest trolling attacks in history,” writes Reddit's recently-departed interim CEO Ellen Pao in a Washington Post op-ed today. “And I have just been blessed with the most astonishing human responses to that attack.” Read the rest

South Carolina: Confederate flag will be removed from Statehouse on Friday, July 10 at 10am


It's about time.

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley, just now: “"The Confederate flag is coming off the South Carolina Statehouse. Tomorrow morning at 10:00am, we will see the Confederate Flag come down,” she added, “with dignity.”

Read the rest

Trump says he'll win the Latino vote


Trump today: “I’ll win the Latino vote because I’ll create jobs. I’ll create jobs and the Latinos will have jobs they didn’t have, I’ll do better on that vote than anybody, I will win that vote." Read the rest

Federal judge cancels Washington Redskins trademark


A federal judge today cancelled the Washington Redskins federal trademark registrations on their name because it's racist. US District Judge Gerald Bruce Lee's decision affirmed a previous ruling that that the name is offensive to Native Americans and as such can't be legally be protected. The cancellation, hailed by Native American activists as a “huge victory,” doesn’t go into effect until the team has exhausted the appeals process in the federal court system. And Redskins President Bruce Allen vowed Wednesday that the team would appeal.

“We are convinced that we will win on appeal as the facts and the law are on the side of our franchise that has proudly used the name Washington Redskins for more than 80 years, said Resdskins president Bruce Allen.

From the Washington Post:

(Lee rejected) the team’s argument that the vast majority of Native Americans had no objection to the name when the trademarks were granted between 1967 and 1990. Instead the judge questioned why the team ever chose the name, pointing out in his ruling that Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary defined the word as “often contemptuous” in 1898, “seventy years prior to the registration of the first Redskins Mark.”
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