Mark's culture picks on NPR's Bullseye: Forbidden Island and Citizen Keane

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From Bullseye with Jesse Thorn from NPR:

This week's recommendations come care of Boing Boing founder and Gweek host Mark Frauenfelder.

He suggests checking out Forbidden Island, a co-operative game. It's a simple premise: collect four treasures from a sinking island.

He also recommends Citizen Keane: The Big Lies Behind the Big Eyes, a biography about the sketchy past of Walter and Margaret Keane, the couple who painted the kitschy pop-art paintings of teary, big-eyed children.

Want to hear more? For more interviews about the best in culture, comedy, and recommendations every week, subscribe to our podcast in iTunes, with our RSS feed or search for "Bullseye with Jesse Thorn" in your favorite podcast app.

Carl Hiaasen's BAD MONKEY, now in paperback!

Carl Hiaasen's amazing comic novel, Bad Monkey, is now out in paperback; I reviewed it last year in hardcover:

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Who deserves the starring role in the film adaptation of The Martian?

In episode 183 of the Sword and Laser, Veronica Belmont and Tom Merritt ponder on Matt Damon’s role in The Martian, why we love to hate villains, and the role of philosophy and ideology in Octavia Butler’s Dawn. Brought to you by Squarespace. Use offer code SWORD for a free trial and 10% off!

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Mitch O'Connell and Dr. Monkey’s Retro Scans

In his vast photo collection are old Chicago movie theaters, delightfully dirty old Times Square, and his backyard tower of impaled baby dolls. Brought to you by Random House Audio (click here for free downloads!)
and by Stamps.com (click here for a special $110 offer!)

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75 questions about science and other great books

winkssWink is a website that reviews one remarkable paper book every weekday. My wife, Carla Sinclair, is the editor. We take lots of photos of the covers and the interior pages of the books to show you why we love them.

This week we reviewed:

Typewriter Art: A Modern Anthology – A handsome collection of this little-known art form

The Where the Why and the How – 75 questions that can’t be conclusively answered by an iPhone

Letter Fountain – A stunningly well-crafted bible of typography

Adventure Time: A Totally Math Poster Collection - Featuring 20 Removable Frameable Prints

Stencil Republic – 20 laser-cut, brown-paper stencils bound on perforated pages

The Good Life Lab – Moving from a high-powered life in New York to off-the-grid living in New Mexico

Take a look at these books and many others at Wink. And sign up for our Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

Poesy guest-reviews the new Ariol book

Our favorite six-year-old guest reviewer, Poesy Taylor Doctorow, is back with a review of the latest volume of Ariol, a French kids’ comic that Papercutz is bringing out in English.

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The Powder Mage Trilogy - Brian McClellan's new epic fantasy series

In the latest episode of the Sword and Laser, Veronica and Tom break down their June book pick, Promise of Blood by Brian McClellan.

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The big lies behind the big eyes of "artist" Walter Keane

This week in Gweek we review Adam Parfrey and Cletus Nelson’s biography of famous kitsch artists, the Keanes. Plus: Plex media server, play putties, and much more. Brought to you by Random House Audio (click here for free downloads!)
and by Stamps.com (click here for a special $110 offer!)

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Thomas Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century is a bestselling economics tome whose combination of deep, careful presentation of centuries’ worth of data, along with an equally careful analysis of where capitalism is headed has ignited a global conversation about inequality, tax, and policy. Cory Doctorow summarizes the conversation without making you read 696 pages (though you should).

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Wink's remarkable book picks of the week

winkWink is a website that reviews one remarkable paper book every weekday. My wife, Carla Sinclair, is the editor. We take lots of photos of the covers and the interior pages of the books to show you why we love them.

This week we reviewed:

The Good Life Lab – Moving from a high-powered life in New York to off-the-grid living in New Mexico

The Ashley Book of Knots – Thousands of old timey knots, both useful and decorative.

The Philosophy Book - An absorbing introductory course on philosophers throughout the ages

Masters of Deception – Optical illusion masterpieces by 20 different artists

Pirate Nightmare Vice Explosion – Found remnants of an amateur dadaist’s library

The Essential Scratch and Sniff Guide to Becoming a Wine Expert – a playful, simple, informative book about wine and its many delectable smells

Take a look at these books and many others at Wink. And sign up for our Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

Hidden mother photos, close up magic, and a cool new kitchen scale [Gweek 151]

Our returning guest is Choose Yourself author James Altucher. Brought to you by Stamps.com. Click here for a special $110 offer!

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Moonhead and the Music Machine

Fresh from the always-great Nobrow Press and comics creator Andrew Rae is Moonhead and the Music Machine, a surreal all-ages graphic novel that tells the coming-of-age story of Joey Moonhead, whose head is a moon, and whose freak-flag is just starting to fly. Cory Doctorow reviews a fine, funny and delightful tribute to album rock, outcast liberation, and high school social dominance.

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Flintpunk and Geekomancy [Sword and Laser 179]

Would you like to be in a George R. R. Martin Book? Got $20K? Don’t mind being killed? Good. You can help wolves. Also we give our first impressions of Brian McClellan’s The Promise of Blood and talk Geekomancy with Michael Underwood.

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The Return of Zita the Space Girl

Ben Hatke’s Zita the Spacegirl kids’ comics are a huge favorite around these parts. In The Return of Zita the Space Girl, Hatke wraps up his first story arc in a way that can only be called an absolute triumph. Cory Doctorow reviews it.

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A book that plays tic-tac-toe with you

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Tic Tac Tome is a book that’s smart enough to play tic-tac-toe with you – no batteries required. You start on the first page by deciding which of the 9 spots to place your X. Then turn to the indicated page number to see where the book places its O. And so on, until one of you wins (or you have a cat’s game). To let the book start first, flip the book over and start from the back page. The photos above show a game started by the book and ending in a cat’s game. I can’t wait for the Chess version – it’ll be a couple of hundred million pages long, so I’ve cleared a spot on my bookshelf for it. (via Wink)