Matt Taibbi's The Divide: incandescent indictment of the American justice-gap

Matt Taibbi’s
The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap
is a scorching, brilliant, incandescent indictment of the widening gap in how American justice treats the rich and the poor. Taibbi’s spectacular financial reporting for Rolling Stone set him out as the best running commentator on the financial crisis and its crimes, and The Divide — beautifully illustrated by Molly Crabapple — shows that at full length, he’s even better. Cory Doctorow reviews The Divide.

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Wink's remarkable book picks of the week

Screen Shot 2014-05-23 at 6.46.25 PMWink is a website that reviews one remarkable paper book every weekday. My wife, Carla Sinclair, is the editor. We take lots of photos of the covers and the interior pages of the books to show you why we love them.

This week we reviewed:

The Engineer’s Sketchbook – A collection of timeless mechanical concepts explained with basic principles

Incredible Cross-Sections - a books that simplifies complex things by bisecting objects on super-size pages

Secret Identity – The fetish art and bizarre fate of Superman’s co-creator

Recording The Beatles – A hefty book in a box that comes with tons of goodies and everything there is to know about the Fab Four recording at Abbey Road

Magic Color Flair - An enchanting collection of Disney artist Mary Blair’s delightful art

Codex Seraphinianus – This is the weirdest book you’ve ever seen

Take a look at these books and many others at Wink. And sign up for our Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

Greenwald's "No Place to Hide": a compelling, vital narrative about official criminality

Cory Doctorow reviews Glenn Greenwald’s long-awaited No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State. More than a summary of the Snowden leaks, it’s a compelling narrative that puts the most explosive revelations about official criminality into vital context.

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Critical cruelty at One-Star Book Reviews

rj
“First of all, the whole thing is almost all dialogue.”

Further to our old friends at You Can’t Please Everyone, a Tumblr devoted to “reviews of classic books, culled from the internet’s think tank”: One-Star Book Reviews.

Wink's remarkable book picks of the week

Screen Shot 2014-05-23 at 6.46.25 PMWink is a website that reviews one remarkable paper book every weekday. My wife, Carla Sinclair, is the editor. We take lots of photos of the covers and the interior pages of the books to show you why we love them.

This week we reviewed:

Codex Seraphinianus -- the weirdest book you’ve ever seen

The Oldest Living Things in the World -- a captivating look at ancient organisms along with a personal memoir of science and adventure

Strange Maps -- q collection of fun and peculiar maps that you won’t find in an ordinary atlas

Art Forms from the Ocean -- exquisite drawings of single-celled plankton

How to be a Genius -- fun exercises to boost your brainpower

X’ed Out and The Hive -- a thrilling continuous nightmare by comix master Charles Burns

Take a look at these books and many others at Wink. And sign up for our Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

The oldest living things in the world

The Oldest Living Things in the World is an amazing hybrid,” says Carla Sinclair, “part traditional coffee table book displaying gorgeous photographs, and part memoir of Rachel Sussman’s journey trekking around the world to photograph the oldest living things that she could find.”

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Godzilla (2014)

Godzilla, like our inner self run amok and gone berserk, just needs a warm mug of cocoa and a good hug. Ethan Gilsdorf on Hollywood’s latest rendering of the kaiju classic.

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Wink's remarkable book picks of the week

Wink is a website that reviews one remarkable paper book every weekday. My wife, Carla Sinclair, is the editor. We take photos of the covers and the interior pages of the books to show you why we love them.

This week we reviewed:

X’ed Out and The Hive – A thrilling continuous nightmare by comix master Charles Burns

Towel Origami – Transform your towels into monkeys, elephants, and other fun origami

Bee - An artist looks at the honeybee through the lens of an electron microscope

Alice in Comicland – Lewis Carroll’s famous creation goes on wild adventures in comics

Infrastructure – A field guide to the complex web of gizmos and structures that make up our world

Toy Stories – Photographs of children and their toys from around the world

Take a look at these books and many others at Wink. And sign up for our Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

Afterlife With Archie: Archie Andrews, zombie hunter!


Back in March, I blogged the Afterlife with Archie comics, and suggested that you wait until the first collection of the series came out before digging into it (the singles were going for silly money). Today, Afterlife with Archie: Escape from Riverdale hits stores, collecting the first series of the comic in one paperback edition. Afterlife With Archie is more than a silly gag -- the creators really do play out a grim, tense, serious zombie story here, albeit leavened with some comeuppances for Riverdale's most annoying recurring characters.

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Color for the Colorblind

Kelly Kittell’s EnChroma CX Receptor colorblind-correcting sunglasses arrived with the following warning: When first trying on the lens, the unusual appearance of colors may be visually distracting. “It’s a bit of an understatement. The first time I saw brick red I was so overwhelmed I stopped cold. Purple and lavender, where have you been all my life?”

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The Oversight: conspiracies, magic, and the end of the world

The clever blendings of history and imagination in Charlie Fletcher’s new novel are satisfying enough to make resolution of its loose ends worth waiting for, writes Cory Doctorow

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Wink's remarkable book picks of the week

winkss-600Wink is a website that reviews one remarkable paper book every weekday. My wife, Carla Sinclair, is the editor. We take photos of the covers and the interior pages of the books to show you why we love them.

This week we reviewed an interactive book that invites you to complete drawings of robots, costumes, monsters, secret lairs, zap guns, sidekicks, superpowers, utility belt gadgets, weapons, vehicles, and secret messages, a book of photographs that show how landscapes change over 120 years, a book filled with facsimile documents about ten popular conspiracy theories, a 600-page graphic novel that reads like a dream, a quest to authenticate 181 would-be masterpieces of the Russian Avant-Garde, and inflatable art and architecture

Take a look at these books and many others at Wink. And sign up for our Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

Sword and Laser Podcast 173: JJ, Destroyer of Canons

The Sword and Laser (S&L) is a science fiction and fantasy-themed book club podcast hosted by Veronica Belmont and Tom Merritt. The main goal of the club is to build a strong online community of science fiction / fantasy buffs, and to discuss and enjoy books of both genres. Check out previous episodes here.

This episode is brought to you by Squarespace, the all-in-one platform that makes it fast and easy to create your own professional website or online portfolio. For a free trial Sand 10% off, go to squarespace.com and use offer code SWORD.

We're very excited to have Bryan Benson on the show today, who backed our Kickstarter for season 2 of video, and got to pick this month's book. He's a game designer, author and all around great guy. Plus, he helped us to realize that JJ Abrams has become the destroyer of canonicity in SciFi.

Read show notes here.

Sword and Laser is not just a podcast; we’ve also been a book club since 2007! Each month we select a science fiction or fantasy book, discuss it during kick-off and wrap-up episodes of the podcast, and continue that discussion with our listeners over on our Goodreads forums. So come read along with us, and even get a chance to ask your questions to the authors themselves!

Sword and Laser: Subscribe RSS | iTunes | Download this episode

Sword and Laser Podcast 172: The Invention of BeerPunk

The Sword and Laser (S&L) is a science fiction and fantasy-themed book club podcast hosted by Veronica Belmont and Tom Merritt. The main goal of the club is to build a strong online community of science fiction / fantasy buffs, and to discuss and enjoy books of both genres. Check out previous episodes here.

[Video Link] Travel fantasy writer Anthony St. Clair (Home Sweet Road, Martini Destiny) is on the forefront of a new genre involving beer and travel, plus he reveals the secret for planning a book with one word.

Read show notes here.

Sword and Laser is not just a podcast; we’ve also been a book club since 2007! Each month we select a science fiction or fantasy book, discuss it during kick-off and wrap-up episodes of the podcast, and continue that discussion with our listeners over on our Goodreads forums. So come read along with us, and even get a chance to ask your questions to the authors themselves!

Sword and Laser: Subscribe RSS | iTunes | Download this episode

Ten conspiracies told as intriguing whodunit stories

Over at Wink, Carla Sinclair reviews Brad Meltzer's History Decoded: The 10 Greatest Conspiracies of All Time, an illustrated book loaded with facsimiles of documents related to famous unsolved mysteries and cover-ups.

Whether you are a believer in conspiracy theories or not, History Decoded takes a fun look at unsolved history that reads like an intriguing collection of short whodunit stories. Author Brad Meltzer (who hosted History’s Decoded series) investigates the top ten most popular conspiracy theories in countdown order, starting with #10: Was John Wilkes Booth (Lincoln’s assassin) really captured, or was he working with the Confederate Secret Service who helped him escape? Meltzer also begins each theory with an envelope that contains copied documents (newspaper clippings, death certificates, ID cards) that you can pull out and examine for yourself.

Review of History Decoded: The 10 Greatest Conspiracies of All Time