Fundraising for San Francisco's legendary Prelinger experimental research library


Hero of the Public Domain Rick Prelinger writes, "Many of you know of Prelinger Library, an independent, experimental research library in San Francisco's South of Market district." Read the rest

Big gallery of the Great San Francisco Earthquake

The Atlantic has a photo gallery of the Great San Francisco Earthquake from 1906:

110 years ago next week, on April 18, 1906, a magnitude 7.8 earthquake centered near the city of San Francisco struck at 5:15 AM. The intense shaking toppled hundreds of buildings, but the resulting out-of-control fires were even more destructive. Broken water mains and limited firefighting capabilities allowed city-wide fires to burn for several days. Nearly 500 city blocks were leveled, with more than 25,000 buildings destroyed. At the time, the city was home to more than 400,000 residents—after the disaster, 250,000 were left homeless. The exact death toll is undetermined, but most estimates place the number of deaths caused by the earthquake and fire at more than 3,000.

Watch it full screen.

[via] Read the rest

To do in San Francisco: 2016's first Ignite event, 4/26


Brady Forrest writes, "Ignite SF's first event of 2016 is on 4/26. We've got lots of great speakers. Eva Galperin (EFF) is going to talk about the FBI, Apple & your iPhone. Renee Diresta is going to dive into conspiracy theories and how algorithms influence policy." Read the rest

City of San Francisco tells man he can't live in wooden box in friend's living room


Illustrator Peter Berkowitz published an editorial in the Guardian explaining why he chose to spend $400 to live in a (cozy) wooden "pod" he made with the help of a friendly designer and another friend who was a woodworker, assembling it in the living room of a pal who charged him $400/month to house the pod (tl;dr: The rent's too damn high, with a smattering of anti-regulation philosophy) Read the rest

To do in San Francisco: reading with Peter Beagle and Carter Scholz


The next installment in the SF in SF reading series is a reading by Peter "Last Unicorn" Beagle and Carter Scholz, hosted by Terry Bisson, on April 17: it's $10 at the door, at the American Bookbinders Museum. Read the rest

Middle class housing projects are the Bay Area's future


When "affordable" homes in San Francisco are advertised as "From the low $1,000,000s", it's not just the working poor who are pushed out of the city: it's everyone, except VCs, people living on VC money, and people who've cashed out on VC-backed companies. Read the rest

Photos from Bring Your Own Bigwheel 16


Fill in the registration form and agree to the code of conduct and you can participate in San Francisco's annual Bring Your Own Bigwheel race. Read the rest

STUCK: Public transit's moment arrives just as public spending disappears


More Americans are riding public transit than ever before, and not a moment too soon, because between oil's direct and indirect costs, climate change, the expense of roadworks, and the scaling problems of private cars, the increasingly urbanized nation needs something to keep its cities from imploding under the logistical challenge of getting everyone everywhere. Read the rest

Cops arrest public defender who was representing her client, face no discipline


San Francisco's Office of Citizen Complaints found that the San Francisco cops who arrested public defender Jami Tillotson after she told them to stop photographing her client in a courthouse hallway were in the wrong, and that they engaged in "conduct reflecting discredit on the department." Read the rest

BART's twitter manager drops truth-bombs, world cheers


On Wednesday night, the person who runs the Twitter feed for San Francisco's BART system began answering riders' frustrated tweets with frank, honest statements that eschewed the bland "thank you for your feedback" and the chipper "we're working on it!" norms of corporate social media in favor of brutally honest assessments of the sorry state of the system, starting with, "BART was built to transport far fewer people, and much of our system has reached the end of its useful life. This is our reality." Read the rest

San Francisco: Premiere of beautiful new contemporary dance from ODC

On Thursday (3/17), the pioneering artists from San Francisco's contemporary dance company ODC will launch their 2016 season with a stunning array of world premiere pieces at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts! See video teasers above and below. Tickets available here. I've seen many ODC performances over the years and the commonality between them is that they are all sublime. This Thursday is the first ever performance of ODC founder/artist director Brenda Way's "Walk Back the Cat," featuring an original score commissioned and performed by Paul Dresher, with visuals by RJ Muna and Ian Winters.

"'Walk Back the Cat,' a metaphor for retracing the complex backstory of an event, explores the skeleton of the creative process," Way says. "How does context affect meaning in dance? Developing from pure movement ideas into a dramatic scenario, the work is conceived as a kind of choreographic puzzle, which ultimately comes together in a scenario inspired by Thomas Hart Benton’s muscular and vital murals of American City Life in the 1930s."

The other pieces in the 2016 season include:

* KT Nelson’s new work, "Going Solo," for the exceptional Private Freeman

* Reprise of Nelson’s explosive 2015 hit, "Dead Reckoning"

* Kimi Okada’s "humorous I look vacantly at the Pacific…though regret"

* An unprecedented co-commission from NY choreographer Kate Weare who brings her fiery movement to the ODC dancers with the world premiere of "Giant"

ODC/Dance Downtown (March 17-27)

"Dead Reckoning":

"I look vacantly at the Pacific... though regret":

Read the rest

Kamasi Washington: free appearance in San Francisco today (2/25)

Kamasi Washington -- the incredible saxophonist and composer who is carrying the spiritual jazz torch pioneered by the likes of John Coltrane, Pharaoh Sanders, and Albert Ayler -- is in San Francisco today (Thursday, 2/25) for the Noise Pop Music Festival. You can see Washington interviewed live, FREE, at 3:30pm today at the Swedish American Hall before his two shows at The Independent. (The Independent shows are sold out but you can still get in by purchasing a Noise Pop badge, which also is your entry into dozens of other killer concerts this week.)

Some years ago, when Kamasi Washington was a teenager, Birdman Records owner David Katznelson heard about his band, The Young Jazz Giants, signed them and took them into the studio. The self-titled debut record came out the following year and the four members of the group still play together today, in fact were featured on THE EPIC. The interview would discuss the founding of the Young Jazz Giants, with focus on Billy Higgins, the recording of that record and the path from there to the Epic.

RSVP to Kamasi Washington Live Interview

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New dark wave from Fake Your Own Death (formerly El Terrible)!


My pal Terry Ashkinos, a veteran of the San Francisco indie music scene (Elephone, El Terrible) keeps the dark wave dream alive with the deep and expansive new track "Close," from Fake Your Own Death's as-yet-untitled album due out in late spring. Listen below! Fake Your Own Death (Ashkinos, Scott Eberhardt, and Adrian McCullough) perform live on February 27 at Bottom of the Hill as part of the killer Noise Pop 2016 music festival. Don't sleep on it.

Fake Your Own Death

Previously on Boing Boing:

Music premiere: Dark noise pop from El Terrible

El Terrible: dark, spare noise pop from SF

Premiere: new video from SF noise pop trio El Terrible Read the rest

Kronos Quartet's Explorer Series this weekend in San Francisco!


My favorite avant-garde classical group Kronos Quartet are holding their Kronos Festival 2016 this weekend at the SF JAZZ Center! I attended the Kronos Festival 2015 and it was easily one of my favorite performances of last year. This year's program weaves experimental and contemporary classical music with a stunning array of international musical traditions from West Africa, Vietnam, Ukraine, Finland, and Afghanistan. Open your ears, eyes, and mind.

While based in San Francisco, Kronos Quartet spends much of the year traveling and performing around the world. This festival brings some of that home to San Francisco. Virtuoso pipa player Wu Man will be the festival’s artist-in-residence.

The festival showcases Kronos in collaboration with guest performers David Coulter (born in the UK), Fodé Lassana Diabaté (Mali), Ritva Koistinen(Finland), Mariana Sadovska (born in Ukraine), and Vân-Ánh Võ (born in Vietnam). The San Francisco Girls Chorus and musicians from Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts also join Kronos onstage to perform new works, and the festival culminates in a daytime family concert celebrating the Lunar New Year.

Kronos Festival 2016: Explorer Series

Read the rest

San Francisco Super Bowl: crooked accounting, mass surveillance and a screwjob for taxpayers & homeless people


It's a universal, dismal truism that all major sports events are ripoffs that transfer money from cities to the pockets of corrupt sporting leagues and bodies, but even by those standards, San Francisco's impending Super Bowl is particularly terrible. Read the rest

San Franciscans: see Kim Stanley Robinson and Cecelia Holland on Jan 17


The SF in SF reading series is back with a fantastic pair of readers: Kim Stanley Robinson (author of Aurora and interstellar colony skeptic) and historical novelist Cecelia Holland. Read the rest

San Franciscans: come to the DNA Lounge for Cyberdelia, see Tank Girl, use the Linux Payphone


JWZ of San Francisco's DNA Lounge writes, "First, I reverse engineered an old payphone and turned it into a Linux computer. This was a ridiculous thing to do and my build log is ridiculous. Second: The reason I did this was to use it as a prop at our next HACKERS party." Read the rest

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