The occult magick of Pokemon Go

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At the Daily Grail, Greg Taylor posted a fascinating essay about the Pokemon Go experience seen through the lens of medieval occult practices in which "incorporeal entities have sometimes been as much a part of the landscape as the everyday physical objects surrounding us that we can touch and see." As Gregory Benford once said, riffing on Arthur C. Clarke, "Any sufficiently advanced magic is indistinguishable from technology." From the Daily Grail:

The modern, scientific view has these entities as products of the imagination; our pattern-seeking minds combining with our evolutionary survival instincts and desire to feel in control, to create phantoms out of nothing. The 'other world' does not exist; its imaginary denizens therefore cannot invade our own world and affect us, as they don't exist in the first place.

How ironic, then, that the modern scientific world has now created its own 'other world' - the world of computer-generated, virtual realities - and the creatures that populate any of those worlds can now manifest within our own plane through augmented/mixed reality. For those with phones to see...

This month, the infernal gates to this other world were thrown open. Within a week of its release, the game Pokémon Go amassed a similar number of active users to that of Twitter - with all those players running about their neighbourhoods, seeking the incorporeal monsters now inhabiting our environment, that can only be seen through a special, magical scrying device.

"Walkers Between Worlds" (Daily Grail) Read the rest

Ventriloquism's past and present

At The Wire, performance artist Sarah Angliss explores the weird history and present state of ventriloquism, from the 16th century exorcism of a demonic dummy to Angliss's own robotic stage companions. Read the rest

Video: The Velvet Underground's multimedia happenings

An excellent clip about Andy Warhol and the Velvet Underground's multimedia performances, from PBS's equally fantastic Andy Warhol: A Documentary Film (2006), viewable in its entirety online (Part 1 and Part 2).

Jonas Mekas, avant-garde filmmaker, on the performance: “I saw a mystical impresario, or sorcerer, structuring of temperaments, egos, and personalities who maneuvered it all into sound image and light symphonies of tremendous emotional and mental pitch…and somewhere in the shadow, totally unnoticeable but following every second and every detail of it was Andy Warhol." Read the rest