SF predicting the present: novel anticipated Detroit water crisis

Paul Di Filippo describes Ben Parzybok's new novel, Sherwood Nation: "The book is obviously as headline-friendly as the Ferguson riots, inequality debates, Occupy protests and climate change reports; but there's also a Joseph Conrad-Grahame Greene-Shakespeare style concern with the nature of power, the roles that are thrust upon us, and the limits of friendship and love."

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Free Di Filippo story inspired ancient Italian city of Matera


Author Paul Di Filippo did a residency for Matera, a legendary, ancient Italian city and wrote "Chasing the Queen of Sassi" based on his experience of the region.

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Kickstarting a fund to translate and publish Chinese sf in English


Neil Clarke from the Hugo-winning Clarkesworld writes, "Clarkesworld Magazine has entered into an agreement with Storycom International in China to locate, translate, and publish Chinese science fiction stories in every issue."

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The Red Volume: benefit anthology of stories by Clarion SF/F workshop grads

Lara Elena Donnelly writes, "The Clarion class of 2012--known as the Awkward Robots--want to tell you a story. Or, more precisely, 17 stories. About post-singularity dreamscapes, gentrified haunted houses, and redcaps in the trenches at Verdun."

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Science fiction's Islamic roots


From Ibn Tufail's 12th century Hayy Ibn Yaqzan to Rokeya Sakhawat Hussain's 1905 feminist masterpiece Sultana's Dream, the Islamic world produced some of the earliest proto-sf, which IO9's Charlie Jane Anders rounds up in an excellent post.

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William Gibson reads Neuromancer

It's from the original audio edition of his seminal 1984 novel, which is sadly no longer available, though it's easy enough to find bootlegs online.

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Madeline Ashby's Hieroglyph story: "By the Time We Get To Arizona"


The Hieroglyph anthology was created by Neal Stephenson, challenging sf writers to imagine futures where ambitious technological projects improved the human condition.

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Steven Gould's "Exo," a Jumper novel by way of Heinlein's "Have Spacesuit, Will Travel"

Steven Gould’s 1993 YA novel Jumper was a spectacular success (even if the film “adaptation” stank on ice), and each of the (all-too-infrequent) sequels have raised both the stakes and the bar for a must-read series. But with Exo, published today, Gould takes his game into orbit — literally.

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High-school English study guide for Homeland, the sequel to Little Brother

Neil Anderson from the Association from Media Literacy (which has a great-sounding upcoming conference) has produced an excellent study guide for my novel Homeland (the sequel to Little Brother) -- Anderson's guide encourages critical thinking about politics, literary technique, technology, privacy, surveillance, and history.

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Excerpt from Cory's story "The Man Who Sold the Moon"


Medium have published an excerpt from "The Man Who Sold the Moon, my 36,000 word novella in Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future, a project to inspire optimism and ambition about the future and technology that Neal Stephenson kicked off (see also What Will it Take to Get Us Back to the Moon?).

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Video: Philip K. Dick on our simulated reality (1977)

In this 1977 video, surrealist science fiction author Philip K. Dick suggests we are living in a computer simulation.

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What will it take to get us back to the Moon?

It took 40 years for us to get back to the surface of the Moon. The adventures of China’s late Jade Rabbit rover ended an absence that would have been unthinkable to families clustered around their TV sets in the 1960s, watching the incredible achievements of the Apollo Program. Where did we get off track? Jekan Thanga from ASU’s School of Earth and Space Exploration, explains the science and politics behind Cory Doctorow’s new novella, “The Man Who Sold the Moon.”

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The Other Half of the Sky: praise-winning space opera with strong women heroes

Laura Mixon (AKA Morgan Locke) writes, "Check out The Other Half of the Sky, a 2013 anthology of original short stories edited by PhD biologist and author Athena Andreadis, co-edited by Kay Holt of Crossed Genres. It has come out of left field to take science fiction by storm. My own take: I loved this book. Readers hungry for women heroes will gobble up these exciting, original space opera tales with a spoon."

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Nerdy shirts, skirts and dresses from Frockasaurus


Etsy's Frockasaurus makes great, pop-culture-inspired clothes for men and women, such as the Men's Star Trek Book shirt and Men's Batman Comics shirt; Hobbit Cover skirt; Legend of Zelda dress; and the Lord of the Rings skirt.

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Lisa Tuttle on the Starshipsofa podcast

Tony C Smith writes, You can listen to the 1974 John W. Campbell Award winning Lisa Tuttle on this week's StarShipSofa (MP3) -- Tuttle is an American-born science fiction, fantasy, and horror author who's published more than a dozen novels, seven short story collections, and several non-fiction titles."

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