A Wrinkle in Time: the graphic novel, still wonderful and fresh two years later

The graphic novel adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time got a rave review here when it first came out in 2012. Two years later, Cory Doctorow re-reads it to his now-six-year-old and discovers fresh delights in a beautiful and fitting tribute to one of literature’s best-loved young adult novels.

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RIP, Daniel Keyes, author of "Flowers for Algernon"

Daniel Keyes, the MD who wrote the classic science fiction novel Flowers for Algernon, has died at 86, of complications from pneumonia. I met Keyes when he received the Science Fiction Writers of America's Author Emertius honor in 2000, and he struck me as a sensitive and thoughtful person. He told the story of how he'd conceived of Algernon while riding the subway to his medical residence, and how pleased he'd been with its reception (it's also one of the small handful of science fiction novels whose film adaptation is in the same league as the book -- the 1968 film "Charly" won its lead an Academy Award).

Algernon is a truly fantastic contribution to literature -- a book that has stayed with me for decades and influenced the way I think about intelligence, science, medicine, and self-determination. Though Keyes never wrote another science fiction work that attained its success, that book alone earned him a richly deserved place in history. (via /.)

X-Wing Fighter knife-block


Starting in August, you'll be able to buy these Star Wars X-Wing knife blocks for £70, with five knives (of unknown quality). At first, I assumed that the naked blades protruded from the block, but on closer inspection, it appears that the chromed sheaths are integral to it. That's a big bonus for practicality and safety, but does limit your options for replacing the knives with your own.

Star Wars X-Wing Knife Block

Modern-day US civil war depicted in "A Better World"

Here's an exclusive excerpt from Marcus Sakey's A Better World, the second book in the Brilliance saga.

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SF novel based on free/open game "Project: Starfighter"


Stephen sez, "Around 13 years ago, I wrote a GPL video game called Project: Starfighter. It is a multi-directional shoot 'em up, with an intricate plot and a diverse cast of characters. Since its release, the game has been ported to a great number of platforms, including the Xbox, Pandora, and Sony PSP. It is now maintained on Sourceforge."

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Homeland shortlisted for the Sunburst Award

I'm honoured and delighted to learn that my novel Homeland has been shortlisted for Canada's Sunburst Award, a juried prize for excellence in speculative fiction. I've won the Sunburst twice before, and this is one of my proudest accomplishments; I'm indebted to the jury for their kindness this year. The other nominees are a very good slate indeed -- including Nalo Hopkinson's Sister Mine and Charles de Lint's The Cats of Tanglewood Forest.

Flintpunk and Geekomancy [Sword and Laser 179]

Would you like to be in a George R. R. Martin Book? Got $20K? Don’t mind being killed? Good. You can help wolves. Also we give our first impressions of Brian McClellan’s The Promise of Blood and talk Geekomancy with Michael Underwood.

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Last Unicorn clothes

Zack writes, "From the horse's mouth, so to speak (read: author Peter S. Beagle): A line of clothes based on Beagle's classic fantasy novel, memorably adapted as a 1982 animated film and an IDW graphic novel. If you've ever wanted 'Schmendrick Leggings,' or a 'Red Bull Poncho Tank,' now's your chance.

The Last Unicorn (Thanks, Zack!)

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Dream Cars: the lost wonders of the automotive age


Dream Cars, an exhibition at Atlanta's High Museum, features the most amazing, doomed, gorgeous automotive designs of the automotive age. Streamlined or blobby, three-wheeled or magnificently finned, these are the cars that leapt off the cover of popular science pulps and into the showrooms, where they died an obscure death. The museum's site has some beautiful photos and curatorial notes on each of the cars in the exhibition, which runs to Sept 7.

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Short documentary about 2001: A Space Odyssey

Look magazine's 1968 mini-documentary about 2001: A Space Odyssey, titled "A Look Behind The Future." (via Laughing Squid)

Backers get gruesomely murdered in crowdfunded Elite novel


BBC presenter Kate Russell's first science fiction novel is Elite: Mostly Harmless, a novelization of the classic video game Elite, whose production was successfully kickstarted last year. One of the backer rewards was to have yourself gruesomely murdered in the pages of the book, and six lucky fans are now enjoying their deaths:

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How Heinlein went from socialist to right-wing libertarian


A review in the New Republic of volume two of the authorized biography of Robert A Heinlein takes the biographer, William H Patterson, to task for his uncritical approach to Heinlein's famously all-over-the-place politics. But there is enough (uncritical) details in the book that the reviewer feels able to parse out Heinlein's swing from socialist to right-wing libertarian (here's my review of part one).

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Koko Takes a Holiday

Five hundred years from now, ex-corporate mercenary Koko Martstellar is swaggering through an easy early retirement as a brothel owner on The Sixty Islands, a manufactured tropical resort archipelago known for its sex and simulated violence. Surrounded by slang-drooling boywhores and synthetic komodo dragons, Koko finds the most challenging part of her day might be deciding on her next drink. That is, until her old comrade Portia Delacompte sends a squad of security personnel to murder her. An exclusive excerpt from Kieran Shea’s new novel, Koko Takes a Holiday.

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Jay Lake, on blogging your own death

jaylake

Simon Owens writes, "I got a chance to interview Jay Lake extensively not long before his death and wrote a long profile on him and his cancer blogging that explores the impact he's had, both on the cancer and science fiction communities. He spoke extensively on what he hoped his legacy would be and how he'd be remembered after he died."

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Dystopia Tracker: science fiction fears that have come to pass

Dystopia Tracker collects the "predictions"* of science fictional dystopias and examines the ways in which they've come true. You can add your own, or suggest ways in which they've come to pass.

*Science fiction doesn't really predict anything except the present. Even sf writers who think they're predicting the future are (like all of us) so mired in the technological fears and hopes of the day that their work ends up telling you more about that than any future.

Dystopia Tracker