Boing Boing 

Wesley Crusher Star Trek hoodie


The iconic, stripe-shouldered uniform made Wil Wheaton the beloved scamp we know and love today, and it can be yours for $60, complete with aura of youthful, exuberant naiveté.

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Profile of MITSFS, MIT's 65-year-old science fiction club


(Pronounced "Misfits") They maintain one of the finest science fiction libraries in the world, have a host of deeply, awesomely nerdy traditions, and are still going strong after influencing the lives of countless happy mutants. I've spoken at their meetings, and it's even cooler than this article suggests.

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Why we love man versus nature struggles

Have you ever wanted to be alone in the woods, drinking your own urine to survive? Probably not, that'd be weird. But you've wondered if you could do it, right? An exclusive essay by the author of the new science fiction novel, The Martian, out in paperback todayRead the rest

The Peripheral: William Gibson vs William Gibson

In The Peripheral, William Gibson's first futuristic novel since 1999's All Tomorrow's Parties, we experience the fantastic synthesis of a 20th century writer -- the Gibson of Neuromancer, eyeball-kicks of flash and noir; and the Gibson of Pattern Recognition, arch and sly and dry and keen. Cory Doctorow reviews. Read the rest

Star Trek uniform hoodies


The $60 Star Trek: Original Series uniform hoodies come in men's and women's cuts, and are available in yellow, blue, and >snicker< red.

Fallen Toronto: a calendar of Toronto's bleak sfnal future


Jim Munroe writes, "We've put our science fiction visions of Toronto's future together in a 2015 calendar called FALLEN TORONTO as a new Kickstarter reward for backing our neo-noir sci-fi webseries HAPHEAD. If you live here you can shiver in nameless dread all the year round, and if you live elsewhere you can revel in schadenfreude at the fall of our socialist den of iniquity."

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Beautiful junkbot rayguns


By Roger Wood/Klockwerks

Benefit for Locus Magazine with Garth Nix and Ysabeau Wilce, Oct 25, SFO


The two will read from their latest titles; tax-deductible admission is $20 ($10 under 15), with proceeds to the Locus Science Fiction Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes Locus Magazine.

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Kickstarting Starshipsofacon, an online SF convention

With Joe Haldeman, Kim Stanley Robinson, Pat Cadigan, Charlie Stross, David Brin and many more!

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Scarfolk: creepy blog is now an amazing book

Back in August, I blogged the announcement of the forthcoming Discovering Scarfolk, a book-length adaptation of the brilliantly creepy Scarfolk Council blog, which chronicles the government publications of a English town that is forever trapped in a loop from 1969-1979, a town that's like Nightvale crossed with Liartown USA, written by John Wyndham. Today, it's out!

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Kickstarting Haphead, a science fiction web series about gamer culture

Haphead, the wonderful science fiction webseries about gamer culture that I wrote about in March, is kickstarting a budget for kick-ass post-production. It's from Jim Munroe, who made Ghosts With Shit Jobs.

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Humble Star Wars Bundle with Dark Horse


Name your price for great Star Wars comics in Dark Horse's first-ever DRM-free foray, and support the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund!

Paolo Bacigalupi's "The Doubt Factory"

From one of science fiction's most versatile writers comes a caper novel about corporate sleaze and net-savvy guerrilla activists that is as thrilling as it is trenchant. Cory Doctorow reviews Paolo Bacigalupi's The Doubt Factory. Read the rest

Brain-computer interface gives lock-in sufferers a way to communicate

"Noninvasive brain-computer interface enables communication after brainstem stroke" (Science Translational Medicine) reports on the successful use of a brain-computer interface to allow an individual with "lock in syndrome" (conscious and aware, but unable to move any part of his body) to spell words and carry on dialogue with his family.

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Rare footage of the 1914 Martian conflict

The History Channel's created a bizarre secret history of a war against Martian invaders that's an allegory for WWI. The accompanying video has a spooky resonance and plausibility that is not to be missed.

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Steven Brust's "Hawk" - a new Vlad Taltos book!

Hawk, the 14th book in Steven Brust's Vlad Taltos series, is a moving, funny and tantalizing end-game glimpse of the assassin, reluctant revolutionary and epic wisecracker. Cory Doctorow explains why he's been reading this generation-spanning series of Hungarian mythology, revolutionary politics, and gastronomy for more than 30 years.Read the rest

Tortoise Tardis cosplay


Photographed by Punkpixzsticks at the Minnesota Ren Faire: Angus, a tortoise dressed as a Tardis (Angus has lots of other costumes). (via Neatorama).

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Lightsaber key-blanks


They're $10 for a set of two -- one red, one blue. Blanks come in KW1/KW10, SC1 or WR5, with more to come.

2 pcs. Red and Blue Light Saber Space Keys (via Oh Gizmo)

RIP, Eugie Foster

The Nebula Award-winning writer/editor had been raising money for cancer treatment; she died today.

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Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars books to be adapted for TV

The books, which are among the best science fiction ever written, have been picked up by Game of Thrones co-producer Vince Gerardis, which bodes very well for the adaptation.

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TBD: appreciating a catalog of the banal gadgets of tomorrow

David already posted about the amazing TBD Catalog, which is filled with "design fiction" about the devices of the future; but I just read it and I need to rave about it.

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Neil Gaiman on the quiet rage of Terry Pratchett


Neil Gaiman's introduction to A Slip of the Keyboard, a collection of Terry Pratchett's nonfiction essays, exposes a little-known side of the writer than many think of as a "twinkly old elf" -- the rage that is Pratchett's engine, driving him to write deceptively simple stories that decry unfairness and make virtue from bravery.

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Man From Mars Radio Hat


It's been three years since we last mentioned the astounding Man From Mars Radio Hat, so here is your triennial reminder that we are a fallen people, our glory years long behind us.

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Revisiting the first Tiptree Award anthology

It's Banned Books Week, and what better way to celebrate than with a review of the first James Tiptree Award Anthology, published in 2004 by the committee who award the Tiptree each year for excellence in science fiction and fantasy that celebrates, explores and expands gender roles?

Lastly, I’d also like to give special “related to short-fiction” mention to the inclusion of “Everything But the Signature is Me” by Alice Sheldon/James Tiptree Jr.—the letter that was written after the person behind the Tiptree persona came to light. It’s friendly, jovial, and almost polished to a shine in its style of conversational discourse; it makes the whole situation of masks, gender, and outing seem gentle or trivial. Read in context with the biography of Sheldon and with other primary materials about how strongly she felt about her gender, her sexuality, and her experience with occupying the persona of a man, though… It’s an interesting counterpoint to all of that, a fascinating way of looking at how one person frames their difficult and complex relationships to the world as a gendered subject. And, more significantly, how that frame can differ depending on audience and intimacy. It’s an interesting piece, one I’d recommend giving a look alongside further reading about the enigmatic Sheldon/Tiptree.

As for the first half of this anthology: judging by my reactions, I’d say that the judges for this award and the editors of this volume are correct in noting that the pieces they’ve chosen are designed to provoke thought and conversation more than to be comfortable and easy to take in. I appreciate stories that give me a complex response, and stories that are trying to do hard work with narrative and gender. I do find myself often struck by a desire for them to go further, do more—but there’s room for all the types of stories on the narrative spectrum.

Short Fiction Spotlight: The James Tiptree Award Anthology (Part 1) [Brit Mandelo/Tor.com]

Science fiction fanzines, 1940s-1970s

Over at Thought Catalog, Mark Dery ruminates on Lenny Kaye's legendary collection of science fiction fanzines from the 1940s-1970s, on display next weekend at the New York Art Book Fair.

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Lauren Beukes's Broken Monsters

Lauren Beukes's latest crime/horror novel Broken Monsters marries the snappy, hard-boiled cleverness of her 2010 novel Zoo City with the visceral horror of 2013's The Shining Girls and yields up a tale that's as terrifying as it is contemporary -- Cory Doctorow reviews Broken Monsters.Read the rest

Homeland wins Copper Cylinder award for best Canadian YA sf novel


The Copper Cylinder Prize, voted on by members of the Sunburst Award Society awarded best YA novel to Homeland; best adult novel went to Guy Gavriel Kay's River of Stars.

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Patrick Rothfuss narrates "The Slow Regard of Silent Things"

The Slow Regard of Silent Things being his next novel, a fantasy title due out at the end of October.

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