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Soylent's new liquid form is kind of spermy, and the guy behind it is sort of creepy

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Annalee Newitz writes at Gizmodo about Rob Rhinehart, erstwhile “creepy nerd messiah” who today posted a long-ass personal essay to mark the release of Soylent 2.0, “the next version of his sperm-esque food replacement drink.”

We read all of the Soylent guy's essay so you do not have to. As Annalee says, it's basically about “how he’s given up alternating current so he can get ready for his life as a space cyborg.”

There are more than 35 paragraphs in Rob Rhinehart's blog post today. Here's the first.

The walls are buzzing. I know this because I have a magnet implanted in my hand and whenever I reach near an outlet I can feel them. I can feel fortresses of industry miles away burning prehistoric hydrocarbons by the megaton. I can feel the searing pain and loss of consciousness from when I was shocked by exposed house wiring as a boy. I can feel the deep cut of the power bill when I was living near the poverty line. I can feel the cold uncertainty of the first time the power went out due to a storm when I was a child. How long before the delicate veil of civilization turns to savagery with no light nor heat nor refrigeration?

Savagery! Perish the thought.

At Gizmodo, Annalee writes:

Rhinehart has all the hallmarks of a future cult leader. First of all, he’s marketing a pseudoscientific bullshit product, Soylent, which promises to liberate your nerd mind from its analog meatsack. Though actual nutritionists say replacing your food with Soylent is a bad idea, why should you trust them? Rhinehart, an electrical engineer, knows better. If you just drink Soylent, you no longer need to do icky physical things like eat solid food and store rotting items in your house. (Yes, he actually refers to food as “rotting ingredients,” which is not exactly a good sign from a dude trying to sell you things to eat.)

But now Rhinehart has taken it to the next level. He isn’t just trying to sell you on a dubious product from science fiction. Now he’s discovered that the road to enlightenment is slick with Soylent. In today’s manifesto, he’ll sell you on a whole new way of life. Inject your fingers with magnets so you can feel electrical current. Then give up on dirty, dirty alternating current, which uses up so much energy. Use a butane “space stove” to heat water for your coffee. Ride in Ubers to cut down on emissions (that is, if you can’t ride “robot horse cheetahs, or drone multicopters.”) Get your clothing custom-made in China, and stop doing laundry. Drink Soylent warm so you don’t need a fridge.

WATCH: Tacky 1980s sci-fi and fantasy opening credits

YouTuber RwDt09, aficionado of all things tasteless, curated this remarkable collection of tacky opening credits for 1980s sci-fi and fantasy TV series. Included on the list:

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Fear of aliens is based on our behavior

Some more words of wisdom and perspective from Neil deGrasse Tyson.

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New 2001: A Space Odyssey trailer

2001: A Space Odyssey got a new trailer to celebrate BFI's theatrical UK re-release for Kubrick's genre-defining film. Even though every shot is already burned into our collective conscience, the trailer is surprising.

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SF Book Review: "They Tell Me I'm The Bad Guy," by R.D. Harless

They Tell Me I'm The Bad Guy

RD Harless' They Tell Me I'm The Bad Guy is a fantastic story of a pre-Apocalyptic Earth barely managing its mutant menace.

Don Guillory wants nothing more than to be left alone. For 10 years he's worked in a factory, not even practicing his awesome extra-human power of fire and heat control. Once ran with the baddest bunch of bad ass super criminals in Europe, but now he is leading a quiet life in middle America. Rapidly Don loses his anonymity, his best friend and any hope for a normal life.

Nano technology, quantum physics and plain old violence fill the pages of They Tell Me I'm The Bad Guy. If you are looking for a great anti-hero gets dragged back in but makes good story, RD Harless' first novel is a winner.

They Tell Me I'm The Bad Guy by RD Harless

Robo-Santa and his Meccano tree, 1960

From vintage ad enthusiast Paul Malon's superb Flickr stream, this 1960 holiday season cover from science fiction magazine Galaxy. He has another one with two aliens sneaking up on Christmas, and a stressed-out interstellar Santa.

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Tiny holiday scenes starring Star Wars advent calendar minifigures

wookie needs a tree. Photo: J5K.

Boing Boing reader J5K of Helsinki, Finland picked up a LEGO 2012 Star Wars Advent Calendar 9509, and has been setting up and photographing cute little holiday scenes with the minifigs. He shared some in the Boing Boing Flickr pool, and you can view them all here.

at-at walker, Star Wars Advent Calendar - Day 10. Photo: J5K.

Aelita, Queen of Mars: Soviet Science Fiction film from 1924

In vintage ad archivist Paul Malon's excellent Flickr stream, I stumbled on this beautiful Soviet film poster for a film titled "Aelita."

A quick Googling revealed that this was for the motion picture Aelita, Queen of Mars, which Wikipedia describes as "a silent film directed by Soviet filmmaker Yakov Protazanov made at the Mezhrabpom-Rus film studio and released in 1924 (...) based on Alexei Tolstoy's novel of the same name."

Some describe it as the USSR's first sci-fi flick. Archive.org has the entire 80-minute film available for online viewing here, though the quality isn't great. It's also on YouTube, and here's part one.

You can also buy it in higher quality on Amazon, and here's their review:

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How to build a trippy meditation chamber, from PopSci 1970 archives

"The Meditator," a personal isolation tank fashioned from 12 pentagons decorated with photo collages. "You may find the sensation akin to that mystical communion with nature that you experience when alone in a forest," according to Popular Science writer Ken Isaacs in November 1970. At popsci.com, they've republished a photo gallery with enough detail that serenity-seeking DIYers in 2012 can once again roll their own.

Close Encounters of the Fifth Kind: Shusei Nagaoka (NSFW '70s sci-fi illustration)

View larger size here. Lovingly scanned and shared in the Boing Boing Flickr Pool by reader v. valenti. Art by Japanese illustrator Shusei Nagaoka, whose sci-fi illustrations were popular during the 1970s and '80s, and graced album covers by ELO, Earth, Wind & Fire, and Deep Purple. There's an awesome little archive of his work here.

Ray Bradbury at NASA JPL, 1971, reading his poem "If Only We Had Taller Been" (video)

[Video Link] A beautiful video from NASA JPL honoring Ray Bradbury, who died Tuesday, June 5 2012 at 91.

Through the years, Ray Bradbury attended several major space mission events at JPL/Caltech. On Nov. 12, 1971, on the eve of Mariner 9 going into orbit at Mars, Bradbury took part in a symposium at Caltech with Arthur C. Clarke, journalist Walter Sullivan, and scientists Carl Sagan and Bruce Murray. In this excerpt, Bradbury reads his poem, "If Only We Had Taller Been."

(Thanks, Stephanie L. Smith)

ISS astronaut, upon seeing inside SpaceX Dragon vehicle first time: "It looks sci-fi."

André Kuipers, a Dutch physician and astronaut with the European Space Agency, was on board the ISS when the SpaceX Dragon vehicle berthed. He took this photograph, and wrote,

Inside of the Dragon module. Beautiful. Spacious, Modern. Blue LEDs. Feels a bit like a sci-fi filmset. Of course it is from Los Angeles.

He wrote more about the historic space milestone here, on his blog.

Last Friday was a special day on my mission. Don and I docked the SpaceX’s cargoship Dragon to the Space Station. Dragon brings new equipment for the crew. On the 31st of May it will return to Earth with supplies from the others and myself. The Dragon mission is the operational highlight of my mission. But it is also a milestone for international spaceflight. This is the first time that a commercial spacecraft has flown to the ISS and docked with the Station. You could say a new era of spaceflight has begun. Soon private companies will take people to and from space.

The Dalek Relaxation Tape (by Peter Serafinowicz)

[Video Link] Created by Peter Serafinowicz.