Send e-cards courtesy of Sir Sean Connery

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Are your notes to pals and co-workers lacking gravitas? Sir Sean Connery, star of such films as Zardoz and The Rock, has just the e-card generator for you.

The link is tucked away at the bottom of Sir Sean's website. Andrea's post earlier led us to this fantastic service.

(Thanks, David Wolfberg!) Read the rest

"Translucent" statues haunt British forest


Created by Rob Mulholland, the photon fairies await your presence in the wilds of Scotland. Just remember: if it bleeds, you can kill it—but these don't bleed. [via r/creepy]

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Afterbrexit: Scotland trolls Theresa May by passing laws she has ridiculed


The Brexit vote split firmly along the Scottish-English border, with the Scottish Remain vote leaving no doubt that the region wanted to stay in the EU; it's just the latest in a series of ever-more-obvious examples of the political incompatibility of the Scottish electorate with English Toryism. Read the rest

Road rage attacker could avoid jail by proving she is an "expert knitter"


A road-raging Scotswoman who tailed her victim for miles before hauling open her door and punching her in the face could avoid imprisonment if she can prove she can knit.

Amanda McCabe told the judge that her apparent pursuit was "a simple coincidence, as she was a “keen knitter” and planned to visit a specialist wool shop," reports Mark Mackay of The Courier.

On hearing that, Sheriff Rafferty laid down a challenge – one that he said could be the difference between liberty and prison.

He told McCabe she would return to court on December 14 with “multiple knitted items” capable of being sold in a charity shop and raising money for good causes.

Put on the spot, she claimed she could knit a jumper in two-to-three-days at a cost of £6 to £7.

It seems odd that having a legitimate reason to be in the area would make any difference as to sentencing over boxing in and physically attacking another driver. But the Courier is quite clear: "sentence was deferred until December for her to be of good behaviour and to produce the knitted items requested by the court" and she will avoid prison if she can "prove she is an expert knitter." Read the rest

Watch this osprey catch a trout in super slo-mo


From the BBC series The Highlands, narrated by Ewan McGregor. From their site: Read the rest

Spreadable Beer


A Scottish craft brewery has developed "spreadable beer," a marmalade flavored with oak-aged pale ale. To go with it, Innes&Gunn is also selling a marmalade-flavored pale ale.

Dougal Sharp, Innis & Gunn founder and master brewer, said: “Launching in this great city has provided us with an opportunity to do what we do best: push the boundaries of what’s possible with beer through innovation and experimentation.

"That’s why we’ve been hard at work brewing a marmalade IPA and even creating spreadable beer for adventurous foodies.

"We’re proud to be setting up shop in such an innovative and vibrant city, we can’t wait to share our passion for great beer with Dundonians.”

Scottish craft brewer launches 'world's first spreadable beer' (Thanks, Wendy!) Read the rest

Powerful video campaign in Scotland against mental health stigma


“Are you okay?”

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Councillor who voted to close all public toilets gets a ticket for public urination


Last May, Jackie Burns, the deputy leader of the Labour Council in South Lanarkshire in Scotland, voted to close all public toilets as part of the Scottish government's £22 million cost-cutting programme; early last Saturday morning, police issued him a £40 ticket for pissing in public. (via Reddit) Read the rest

Loch Ness Monster was almost named after Queen Elizabeth


Famed British conservationist Sir Peter Scott, who gave the Loch Ness Monster the scientific name of Nessiteras rhombopteryx as part of an effort to protect it as an endangered species in case it's real, originally tried in 1960 to get Queen Elizabeth to approve the name Elizabethia Nessiae. Read the rest

Little Library: miniature book-charms for necklaces, bracelets and earrings

From Abigail in Sterling, Scotland: tiny, adorable, books you wear: The Hobbit, The Little Prince, Harry Potter, To Kill a Mockingbird, Sherlock Holmes, The Fault in Our Stars, Alice in Wonderland, and any other book you desire. Read the rest

The worst parallel parker in Scotland


Bo'Ness, West Lothian, Scotland. The driver of a yellow Fiat compact spots a perfect space to park up. And so the time-honored dance of the incompetent parallel parker begins. But, dear reader—wait for it.

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Don't come to your court-date in a lime-green Batman costume

Honestly, it should go without saying. Read the rest

The Loch Ness ladle

It's $21.80 and will make your tureen into a cryptozoological mystery. (via Kottke) Read the rest

Scots! Here's your chance to kill Scotland's national ID database

Ed from the Open Rights Group sez, "The Scottish Government has plans to create a national identity database and we have to stop it." Read the rest

UK Home Office suffers setback: can't destroy family by deporting American head-teacher as his British wife begins cancer treatment

The UK Home Office's war on migration has suffered a setback: an American head-teacher had lived in Scotland for nearly ten years will be allowed to stay and help his British wife of four years as she begins cancer treatments. The Home Office had been absolutely set on deporting David MacIsaac, having declared his marriage "a sham," despite the massive shortage of qualified head teachers. But after the pesky Observer newspaper called attention to MacIsaac's plight, and Scottish politicians took up his cause, the poor Home Office was forced to change direction, causing irreparable economic harm to the private security company that would have otherwise been enriched by a government contract to shackle MacIsaac and physically abuse him all the way back to America.

But have no fear: Britain's new migration policies will ensure that countless other MacIsaacs will be cruelly taken from their homes and families in an effort to pander to the Daily Mail, bigots, and crypto-bigots who say things like "Oh, I'm not a racist, but when people arrive too fast for us to assimilate them, it doesn't do anyone any good" (or its cousin, "I'm no bigot, but certain groups just don't want to assimilate.") Read the rest

Ken Macleod on Iain Banks

CBC radio's excellent magazine show As It Happens conducted a short, lovely interview with Scottish sf writer Ken Macleod about Iain Banks, who had been his friend since high school. It's a beautiful piece of audio, and a heartfelt one. My condolences, Ken. Read the rest

Detailed obit of Iain Banks

Iain Banks died yesterday. The Guardian's John Mullan does justice to the long and important career of one of the best writers in two fields:

In 2010 he gave an interview to BBC Radio Scotland in which he spoke with painful frankness about the breakdown of his relationship with his first wife. But then the media interview seemed his natural forum: it is difficult to think of a more frequently interviewed British novelist.

While his science fiction spanned inter-stellar spaces, his literary fiction kept its highly specific sense of place. The place that gives the title to his 2012 novel Stonemouth is fictional, but, like other fictional places in earlier Banks novels, it is a highly specific Scottish town. Like The Crow Road and The Steep Approach to Garbadale –it is the story of a man coming back to his family home, and it is difficult not to think that this is Banks's story of himself.

Iain Banks dies aged 59 Read the rest

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