Electronic voting machines suck, the comprehensive 2016 election edition


It's been thirteen years since we started writing here about the shenanigans of the electronic voting machine industry, who were given a gift when, after the contested 2000 elections, Congress and the Supreme Court signaled that elections officials had to go and buy new machines. Read the rest

How America abandoned the only policy that consistently closes the black-white educational gap


After 1954's landmark Brown v Board of Ed ruling, America's (largely racially segregated) cities began racially integrating their schools by busing black kids to white neighborhoods, a project that hit its stride at the start of the 1970s. It worked. Read the rest

Leaked: damning Scott Walker dark money docs that judge ordered destroyed


Again and again, Wisconsin governor Scott Walker flouted election laws to raise millions from some of the richest executives and biggest corporations in America, illegally laundering the money through the nominally independent, nonprofit Wisconsin Club for Growth -- and now we have all the details, thanks to an enormous leak of documents that a Wisconsin judge ordered destroyed. Read the rest

DoJ: Supreme Court ruling means only 5 states will have federal election observers this November

When the Supreme Court struck down the Voting Rights Act in 2015, we learned that the 2016 election would be the first in two generations without the basic protections for equal voting rights for all people. Read the rest

More Perfect: Radiolab's genius podcast about the Supreme Court


When I first heard that Radiolab (previously), the wonderful podcast that combines deep dives into technical subjects with masterful storytelling, was going to start a new podcast about the Supreme Court, it sounded like a weird fit. Read the rest

Supreme Court strikes down Texas abortion law


The Court ruled in Whole Woman’s Health v Hellerstedt that the Texas law placed undue burdens on clinics that performed abortions by requiring them to meet the standards of ambulatory surgical centers, use doctors with admitting privileges at local hospitals -- measures that led to the closure of three quarters of the state's abortion-providing facilities since 2013. Read the rest

UPDATED: Clarence Thomas rumored to be considering retirement

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. [Wikimedia Commons]

The curiously silent conservative Supreme Court justice -- whose term began with the infamour Anita Hill confirmation hearings -- is said to be "mulling retirement" after the election in order to travel America in an RV with his wife.

Update: Clarence Thomas's wife Ginny has angrily denied this in a Facebook post: "For all those contacting me about the possibility of my husband retiring, I say --- unsubscribe from those false news sources and carry on with your busy lives." Read the rest

Supreme Court ruling is a blow to copyright trolling business-model


In 2013, the Supreme Court heard Kirtsaeng, a copyright case brought by the publisher Wiley, who argued that legal books became illegal when brought into America, because their copyright licenses were nation-specific. Read the rest

US government and SCOTUS change cybercrime rules to let cops hack victims' computers


The Supreme Court -- at the behest of the US government -- has announced changes to "Rule 41," a crucial procedure of the US court system, which will give law enforcement sweeping powers to hack into computers anywhere in the world, including victims' computers, with drastically reduced oversight. Read the rest

Inside a Supreme Court case on cheerleader uniforms, a profound question about copyright


Copyright protects creative expression, but not utilitarian forms: that's why the silkscreened art on your t-shirt is copyrightable, but the t-shirt's design itself is not. Read the rest

Printer ink wars may make private property the exclusive domain of corporations

Serfs paying their feudal lords

Printer manufacturer Lexmark hates America, and everything good and right in the world, because we keep stubbornly insisting that if we buy a printer cartridge, we can refill it, because it's ours.

Read the rest

Supreme Court sends Authors Guild packing, won't hear Google Books case


The Authors Guild has been trying to get a court to shut down Google's book-scanning/book-search program for more than a decade. Read the rest

GOP's anti-abortion strategy could establish precedent for massive, corrupt regulation


The US Republican Party welds together two separate and sometimes conflicting ideologies: dogwhistles to Christian conservatives on abortion, LGBTQ issues, etc; and a doctrinaire commitment to "free markets" and deregulation, often at the expense of the working class Christian conservatives whose votes are coaxed forth with the campaign dollars funded by the one percenter beneficiaries of the deregulation movement. Read the rest

Forced arbitration clauses are a form of wealth transfer to the rich


A federal judge called America's move to forced arbitration and bans on class-action suits -- bans favored and enabled by Scalia -- "among the most profound shifts in our legal history." Read the rest

Publicity Rights could give celebrities a veto over creative works


EFF, the Organization for Transformative Works, and the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund have filed a brief [PDF] in a Supreme Court case over "publicity rights" -- the right of famous people to veto the use of their names and likenesses in other works, like caricatures, documentaries, and biographies. Read the rest

What is marriage, anyway? Sesame Street's Grover and a cute child explain.

Helpful definition for anyone confused by the Supreme Court ruling that legalized gay marriage in America.

'No Gays Allowed' in this East Tennessee hardware store

That recent Supreme Court gay marriage decision done got someone's britches all up in a bunch.

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