Boing Boing 

WATCH: More private companies gather license plate data

It's no secret that license plate data is big business. Here's a demo of how these companies gather data as they troll parking lots and public streets gathering indiscriminate license plate info, looking for matches on other databases.

Read the rest

Apple and Amazon spend big bucks to keep Cook and Bezos out of harm's way

tim-cook

Apple spends nearly $700,000 to protect Tim Cook,

Read the rest

Parenting and the Internet: the smarter, missing third way


My new Guardian column, What is missing from the kids’ internet? discusses three different approaches to teaching kids information literacy: firewall-based abstinence education; trust/relationship-based education, and a third way, which is the proven champion of the offline world.

Read the rest

FBI investigating security of Hillary Clinton's emails, and thumb drive they're stored on

120214-D-TT977-225

The FBI is investigating how secure Hillary Rodham Clinton's email practices were when she was secretary of state and used a private email server, reports The Washington Post.

Read the rest

Proof-of-concept firmware worm targets Apple computers

It's like Bad USB, with extra Thunderbolt badness: Web-based attacks can insert undetectable malicious software into a Mac's UEFI/BIOS, which spreads to other machines by infecting Thunderbolt and USB devices.

Read the rest

We're suing the Justice Department over FBI’s secret rules for using National Security Letters on journalists

ladyyy

Freedom of the Press Foundation this week filed a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit against the Justice Department over their unpublished rules for using National Security Letters and so-called informal “exigent letters” to conduct surveillance of journalists.

Read the rest

Going to DEFCON? EFF's got your back


The Electronic Frontier Foundation always has a huge presence at Las Vegas's DEFCON, but this year, we're hosting our first-ever badge-hack contest!

Read the rest

When online security is literally a roll of the dice, which dice do you use?

My search for an easy way to generate strong passwords and passphrases led me to the "Diceware" method Cory wrote about on Boing Boing. This was no game. I needed serious dice.Read the rest

Typing patterns are the latest anonymity-shattering personal identifier

crapLong a theoretical threat, the observation of typing patterns has been refined into a "a highly practical attack" aimed at user anonymity over the internet.

Read the rest

Self-aiming sniper rifle can be pwned over the Internet


The $13,000 Trackingpoint sniper rifle is vulnerable to wifi-based attacks that allow your adversary to redirect bullets to new targets of their choosing.

Read the rest

Chrysler has to recall its cars due to security vulnerabilities


Chrysler, whose Jeep Cherokees were demonstrated to be vulnerable to Internet-based attacks on their steering and brakes (as well as radios, air conditioning and other systems) has recalled 1.4M cars due to software vulnerabilities.

Read the rest

Once again: Crypto backdoors are an insane, dangerous idea


The Washington Post editorial board lost its mind and called on the National Academy of Sciences to examine "the conflict" over whether crypto backdoors can be made safe: the problem is, there's no conflict.

Read the rest

Hackers can pwn a Jeep Cherokee from the brakes and steering to the AC and radio


A zero-day exploit for Jeep Cherokees allows hackers to control everything from the engine to the air-conditioning over the Internet, overriding the driver at the dashboard.

Read the rest

How did an Ohio inmate get prison administrators' usernames and passwords?

Ohio authorities are investigating how a prisoner obtained a list of the usernames and passwords for prison administrators.

Read the rest

With faked degrees, U.S. tech official ran law enforcement data systems for years. Then he resigned, got a new gov job.

download (2)

A technology officer with faked college degrees resigned from the Interior Department after he was busted. He was then hired by the Census Bureau.

Read the rest

UK schools' "anti-radicalisation" software lets hackers spy on kids


The spyware that Impero supplies to UK schools -- which searches kids' Internet use for "jihadi" terms -- uses "password" as its default password, and the company has threatened brutal legal reprisals against the researcher who repeatedly demonstrated their total security negligence.

Read the rest

United rewards security researchers with air miles

_84307940_united_airline

The BBC reports that after two "hackers" spotted security holes in its website, United rewarded them with a million miles each.

One security expert said the scheme was a big step forward for online security.

"Schemes like this reward hackers for finding and disclosing problems in the right way. That makes the internet safer for all of us," said security consultant Dr Jessica Barker.

"Bug bounties are common in tech companies as they tend to understand online security a bit more, but other industries are catching up," said Dr Barker.