Amazing floating bird caught on video

YouTube user Ginger Beard created this illusion of a floating bird by capturing the video at 20 frames per second, the same speed at which the bird flaps its wings.

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Social media's other (cooler!) makeup artists: women who specialize in gory sfx

There are plenty of extremely talented young women who make good money running social media feeds of their fantastic makeup artistry, but they don't have a patch on the artistry of the women and girls who specialize in horror makeup effects, perfecting and sharing techniques for the grossest, greatest prosthetic-and-paint monster and gore effects. Read the rest

Watch breathtaking fireballs through a trippy kaleidoscopic effect

For their film Fire, Saulo Jamariqueli and Dirk Rees put a couple of fire breathers in a dark studio with a reflective surface, then ran the impressive footage through a kaleidoscope filter, making it even cooler. Read the rest

Wonderful home Super 8mm special effects experiments from the 1970s

Stoned special effects fun from the 1970s.

"I created these films in the 70's using Super 8mm film and a bunch of my creative friends," writes uploader WooferHound Town. "This is a collection of clips, there is no story here. This stuff was mostly filled in Huntsville Alabama.

(via /r/ObscureMedia, thanks UPSO!)

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Meet a creepy little girl from the uncanny valley

Landon Meier, maker of fantastically realistic (and hyperrealistic) masks introduces us to a wonderfully weird little girl who visits us from the uncanny valley. (Stan Winston School via Laughing Squid)

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Famous Monsters of Filmland's 1965 guide to home monster makeup

The Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-Up Handbook is a 1965 classic: Famous Monsters of Filmland founder Forrest Ackerman tapped movie makeup legend Dick Smith to create guides for turning yourself into any of three Martians, two kinds of werewolf, a "weird-oh," a "derelict," a ghoul, a mummy, Frankenstein's monster, Quasimodo, Mr Hyde, "split face," and more. Read the rest

Adam Savage goes behind the scenes of Ghost In The Shell

Adam Savage visits with Weta Workshop's Richard Taylor for a glimpse of the mecha-geisha masks, animatronic amazement, and far-out fabrication that brought the new Ghost in the Shell film to life. Directed by Rupert Sanders and starring Scarlett Johansson and Pilo Asbaek, Ghost in the Shell hits theaters in a month. Trailer below. (Tested)

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Making of the creatures in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Enjoy this "creature featurette" with director Gareth Edwards and Creature Effects Supervisor Neal Scanlan introducing us to the strange characters in Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.

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The biomechanical horror of Alien and H.R. Giger

In this video essay by Kristian Williams, the story of the biomechanical beasts from the mad mind of H.R. Giger, surrealist painter and designer best known for his work on the special effects team behind the film Alien (1979).

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Fantastic short documentary on movie sound effect artists

Director Daniel Jewel invites us into the magical and world of foley artist Pete Burgis and Sue Harding who create sound effects using techniques that look odd when you see them but sound spot on when paired with the right visual.

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Futurististic computer screens are mostly blue

Chris Noessel and Nathan Shedroff demonstrated that in movies depicting computers in the future, the screens are mostly blue.

Some interesting exceptions: 1991's Terminator 2 made red popular, and the Matrix Trilogy made green the in thing for a while. But within a couple of years, we were back to blue. And it's been this way since the 60s.

I think that green usually signifies "old" computers, perhaps? The Matrix was clever in that way.

Forgive me if I'm mistaken, but I'm struck by the thought that the first and third Alien movies (which were British haunted house movies, sort of) used green screens, whereas the second one, Aliens (an American action movie) used blue. Google Images isn't entirely helpful.

Guardians of the Galaxy (above) appears, of course, to be both. Read the rest

BWAAAAP! Inception button makes everything dramatic

Need to spice up your next meeting or school presentation? Dave Pedu created this handy button to play the now-ubiquitous musical sting! Read the rest

WATCH: Waterphones, source of creepy film music effects

Ever wonder how they make unsettling dissonant sounds in sci-fi and horror films? Some are made by waterphones or synths emulating them. Portland-based Robb Bockman demonstrates an analog waterphone, gawdyphone, and dopephone in this video. Read the rest

Is bad CGI ruining movies? A nuanced critique

It's an age-old complaint about video games and films: bad graphics make them suck. But plenty of classic entertainment holds up even if the effects don't. RocketJump Film School examines the issue in a brisk overview. Read the rest

WATCH: How we used Slo-mo in 2014

If you're taking things a little more slowly than usual this weekend after a big New Year's Eve, maybe you'll appreciate this montage of great slow-motion shots from films, put together by The Nerdwriter to a soothing and quiet track.

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Gimpsuited greenscreen fluffer flicks shampoo model's hair

An actual job is to be a greenscreen fluffer, dressed in a chromakey gimpsuit, hidden in the background for shampoo commercials, tasked with artfully flicking models' hair. If you're very good at that job, you can level up to gimpsuited Superman cape-puppeteer.

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Video: rapid-fire history of film effects

Video editor Jim Casey clipped together this wonderful accelerated look at The Evolution Of Visual Effects. Read the rest

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