BWAAAAP! Inception button makes everything dramatic


Need to spice up your next meeting or school presentation? Dave Pedu created this handy button to play the now-ubiquitous musical sting! Read the rest

WATCH: Waterphones, source of creepy film music effects


Ever wonder how they make unsettling dissonant sounds in sci-fi and horror films? Some are made by waterphones or synths emulating them. Portland-based Robb Bockman demonstrates an analog waterphone, gawdyphone, and dopephone in this video. Read the rest

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WATCH: How we used Slo-mo in 2014


If you're taking things a little more slowly than usual this weekend after a big New Year's Eve, maybe you'll appreciate this montage of great slow-motion shots from films, put together by The Nerdwriter to a soothing and quiet track.

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Gimpsuited greenscreen fluffer flicks shampoo model's hair

An actual job is to be a greenscreen fluffer, dressed in a chromakey gimpsuit, hidden in the background for shampoo commercials, tasked with artfully flicking models' hair. If you're very good at that job, you can level up to gimpsuited Superman cape-puppeteer.

(via Super Punch) Read the rest

Video: rapid-fire history of film effects

Video editor Jim Casey clipped together this wonderful accelerated look at The Evolution Of Visual Effects. Read the rest

The Making of Raiders of the Lost Ark

The Making of Raiders of the Lost Ark, aired on PBS in 1981. Read the rest

Real-life Portal adventure

Jason Craft is very good at special effects. As proof, I offer this homebrew Portal video, in which Craft and friends animate an excellent (and rather comical) Portal adventure. I was amazed to discover that the gun itself is also animated.

My interpretation of what a real POrtal gun would be like if one existed. Based on the video game, POrtal. I tried to match the game as close as possible. This was the most challenging project I have ever undertaken, consisting of 3D tracking, seamless camera cuts and 3D camera projection. This started out as an experiment since I didn't think I could even pull it off, if I knew it would've turned out as good as it did I would've put more of a story behind it. O well, it makes up for in Visual Effects, ENJOY!

Breakdowns are coming.

For those of you that think the gun is a physical prop you can buy, well.....sorry to break the news to you, but it's entirely CG. The 3D Portal gun was replacing/covering up a painted up coffee can with tracking markers.

POrtal: Terminal Velocity (Thanks, Fipi Lele!) Read the rest

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Playing God with a high-speed/high-def video camera

Tom Guilmette spent a productive evening locked in a Las Vegas hotel room with a Phantom Flex high-speed/high-def video camera, taking high-speed footage of water, breaking glasses, himself jumping on the bed, and other everyday phenomena that become amazing and dramatic when slowed down to wachowskiian speeds and cleverly edited.

Violating the laws of nature. Playing God. Capturing stuff we are not supposed to see. Potentially opening up a wormhole in the fabric of time.

These are a few of the things I think about while shooting with a Phantom High Speed Digital Cinema camera. The above video is a bunch of test footage I shot to get familiar with the new "Flex" version. I shot inside my Las Vegas Palms Casino hotel room between the hours of 2am and 6am. If you had a Phantom in your bedroom, you would stay up too!


Nice survey of great title design

A Brief History of Title Design from Ian Albinson on Vimeo.

Last year, Pesco mentioned the new SXSW Title Design Competition. Ian Albinson's presentation video for this year's SXSW "Excellence in Title Design" competition screening summarizes a lot of the really good work in film (and some recent television), from Intolerance, to Enter the Void. Some good films to add to your watch list, too. Link has full list of titles. Video link. Read the rest

Cracking ice-sheets sound like Star Wars blasters

This remarkable recording of ice-sheets cracking on a frozen lake sounds just like a Star Wars blaster fight. Andreas Bick, a Berlin sound designer/composer, made the recording and explains, on his Silent Listening blog: "In my experience, thin ice is especially interesting for acoustic phenomena; it is more elastic and sounds are propagated better across the surface. Snowfall, on the other hand, has a muffling effect and the sound can only travel to a limited extent. The ice sheet acts as a huge membrane across which the cracking and popping sounds spread. Underwater microphones proved especially well-suited for these recordings: in a small hole drilled close beneath the surface of the water, the sounds emitted by the body of ice carry particularly well."

Dispersion of Sound Waves in Ice Sheets (via Kottke)

(Image: Frozen Lake, a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike image from m.prinke's photostream) Previously:Star Wars Telegraph -- the never-made toy - Boing Boing Cabinet door's squeals are eerily Chewbaccaesque - Boing Boing MAME oscilloscope plays Star Wars arcade game - Boing Boing More kitschy Star Wars holiday vinyl - Boing Boing Read the rest