WATCH: Sharks' shoreline feeding frenzy on school of fish

Fisherman Donnie Griggs captured the scene at North Carolina's Cape Lookout National Seashore. Below is a similar frenzy in the Bahamas.

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Massive whale shark lashed to truck

Dead-whale-shark

A fisher in China's Fujian province hauling home his catch of the day, a giant whale shark that reportedly weighed two tons and was 16 feet long.

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Stunning great white shark footage

Absolutely breathtaking great white shark footage captured by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution researchers using their SharkCam underwater drone near Mexico's Guadalupe Island.

REMUS SharkCam is a specially outfitted REMUS-100 autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with video cameras and navigational and scientific instrumentation that enable it to locate, track, and film up close a tagged marine animal, such as a North Atlantic white shark (great white). The vehicle is pre-programmed to home in on a signal from a transponder beacon attached to the animal at depths up to 100 meters (330 feet) and in a variety of patterns and configurations.

Seeking: "Colossal cannibal great white shark"

Australian scientists are seeking a "mystery sea monster" that likely swallowed a 9-foot great white shark. Most likely, it was an even bigger great white shark, specifically a 2-ton "colossal cannibal great white shark."

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GoPro captures scary meeting between diver and shark

Scuba diver Jason Dmitri's encounter with a shark was caught on film, but he bears no grudge for the beast that tried to get a piece of him.

"The shark was acting in his natural environment," Dmitri wrote on his YouTube page. "I have no ill will toward him and will get back in the water and continue to protect the reef for future generations."

Diver wearing GoPro camera comes face-to-face with shark [Metro via Gawker]

Support marine conservation research and join a shark tagging expedition


A participant helps tag a blacktip shark.


David Shiffman

Marine Biologist, blogger, and science-tweeter David Shiffman sends word to Boing Boing readers of a wonderful opportunity to support shark research, and have a close encounter of your own with these beautiful creatures:

Have you always wanted to be a marine biologist? Have you been fascinated by sharks since you were young? For me, the answer to both questions is yes...and I'm currently living my childhood dream! I'd like to invite you to join me for a day of shark research with my lab, the University of Miami's RJ Dunlap Marine Conservation Program (SharkTagging.com and Facebook.com/SharkTagging). I'm participating in the 4th SciFund Challenge (SciFundChallenge.org), a crowd-funding event for scientific research.

The reward for a $400 donation to my project is a day on our lab's shark research boat!

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X-ray of a hammerhead shark

Last week, scientists described a new species of hammerhead shark, the Carolina hammerhead. Though slightly smaller than the scalloped hammerhead species it was previously thought to be a part of, the Carolina hammerhead was ID'd as something different with the help of DNA samples, not visual descriptions. This, courtesy shark blogger David Shiffman, is the Carolina hammerhead's head, in beautiful x-ray vision.

New hammerhead shark discovered

Sneaky fellow looks just like the other ones. [Atlanta Journal-Constitution]

How dangerous is it to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage?

At Slate, shark scientist and blogger David Shiffman breaks down the risks that swimmer Diana Nyad was really taking this week when she swam from Cuba to Florida without a shark cage. The mere phrase "without a shark cage" makes this sound like a huge risk, Shiffman writes. But the historic swim, itself, is the real achievement. The sharks weren't actually that big of a danger. (BONUS: An explanation of how, exactly, one is supposed to swim long distances inside a shark cage, to begin with.)

Shark inside shark's mouth

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Researchers from the University of Delaware snapped this fantastic photo of a dogfish swallowed by a sand tiger shark. The scientists were in the Delaware Bay seeking tagged sharks to better understand their behavior.

"This unlucky smooth dogfish couldn't resist the menhaden used as bait and, unfortunately, fell victim to one of the top predators in the bay," according to a posting by the University's Ocean Exploration, Remote Sensing, Biogeography (ORB) Lab. "The dogfish was about 3 feet (1 meter) long and completely swallowed by the sand tiger shark."

Shark-centric "Ask Me Anything" on Reddit tomorrow!

David Shiffman, a fantastic scientist and ocean blogger, has spent the past week correcting the errors of Discovery's increasingly misleading Shark Week programming. Tomorrow, at noon eastern, he'll be on Reddit for a shark-centric round of "Ask Me Anything". Got shark questions? David Shiffman will have sharp answers.

What's inside the stomach of a mako shark?

Psst, hey kid. You wanna see some clips from the dissection of one of the largest mako sharks ever caught? Sure you do.

This NOAA video has amazing footage of the shark's stomach — so big it fills a tall Rubbermaid tub — and the even more amazing footage of scientists lifting an almost completely intact sea lion head out said shark's stomach.

What's the benefit? Studying the stuff in a shark's stomach helps us understand how different species are interrelated — which helps scientists figure out how to better manage the conservation of whole ecosystems. Essentially, write the good folks at Smithsonian.com, this is an example of scientists making valuable use out of a not-exactly-ideal situation. The shark was legally caught and killed by fishermen filming a scene for a reality TV show.

Video Link

Some real math on the real risk of shark attacks


Great white shark. © Oceana/David Stephens.

Shark attack stats: "The real threat is humans. For every one human killed by a shark, there are approximately 25 million sharks killed by humans."

About 200 million people go to U.S. beaches each year. About 36 of those hundreds of millions are attacked by sharks. Most of them survive. In contrast, more than 30,000 of those millions of beach-goers are to be rescued from surfing accidents. And many of those humans each year die, or must be rescued, from drowning incidents in which no other creature is to blame.

So, will we see Human Week, or Human-nado mockumentaries any time soon?

[Oceana.org]

Unnecessary shark attack safety advice

Your chances of being killed by a shark are 1 in 3.8 million. But, you know, just in case, here's what you do to survive a shark attack.

The real scoop on the biggest shark that ever lived

Megalodon is dead, to begin with. (Not that you'd know that from watching the Discovery Channel's recent intentionally fake, but presented as factual, documentary on the subject.) But the extinct giant shark — 3x the length of a Great White and 10x the mass — is still pretty damn fascinating. Check out this actually factual treatment of the biggest shark that ever lived at The Contemplative Mammoth blog.