Boing Boing 

FOIA Machine party in San Francisco

Alan sez, "The Center for Investigative Reporting's 'FOIA Machine' is hosting an Open Beta launch event Wednesday, June 25 at Mother Jones's San Francisco office. This was one of the stretch goals from their successful Kickstarter but the event is open to anyone who pre-registers. There will also be a livestreamed roundtable discussion centered on investigative journalism."

Warrantless spying makes spying-with-a-warrant impossible

Tim Bray's taxonomy of privacy levels makes a compact and compelling argument that the existence of warrantless spying and security sabotage is what drives people to adopt cryptographic techniques that can't be broken even with a warrant.

Ottawa Public Library and US Embassy open makerspace

Mark Shainblum writes, "The Ottawa Public Library (OPL) and the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa have collaborated to open Ottawa's first public makerspace, entitled Imagine Space -- an American corner."

Makers: the Japanese fan-trans

Haruka Tsubota has undertaken a Japanese fan-translation of my novel Makers. It's available as Epub and Mobi, and licensed CC-BY-NC-SA.

Cory coming to SLC

I'm delighted to announced that I'll be the guest of honor at Salt Lake City's Westercon 67 this July -- Westercon being the annual convention for science fiction fandom west of the Mississippi. There's quite a fantastic roster of other guests as well! See you 44 days in SLC!

Creative Commons's public domain game jam

From Creative Commons's Elliot Harman: "The idea of The Public Domain Jam is to encourage developers to create games based on public domain assets and stories, and optionally give the games themselves back to the public domain via the CC0 waiver; there's a $1000 prize for the best CC0 game."

Cloud computers are computers you can only use with someone else's permission

As Adobe Creative Suite struggles with its license-server outage, stranding creative professionals around the world without a way of earning their living, a timely reminder: a cloud computer is a computer you're only allowed to use if the phone company and a DRM-peddling giant like Adobe gives you permission, and they can withdraw that permission at any time.

A year ago, it was a pretty big day for the Internet

We didn't know it at the time, but 16 May 2013 was a pretty big day for the Internet: the Rob Ford/crack smoking story broke; adorable hatchet-wielding hitchhiker/Internet meme Kai was sought for murder in NJ; 16-year-old Kiera Wilmot was spared from prison for doing a science experiment at school and got a scholarship to space camp; and the guy who put his own face in his child sex-abuse videos was caught, thanks to the Internet's human flesh search-engine.

Incoming Creative Commons CEO explains plans

Elliot from Creative Commons sends us "An inspiring piece by our incoming CEO about why Creative Commons is important to him and how he plans to change the organization: "'In today's legal environment, the commons is increasingly under threat. New works are restricted by copyright from the moment they are created until long after their creators are dead, and stricter copyright rules are almost always demanded by large rights-holders who benefited from the commons in the first place. It's like running across a rope bridge only to cut it loose once you get to the other side.'"

Largest-ever damages sought

Anton Purisma has launched a civil rights suit against an airport Au Bon Pain restaurant; he's asking for $2,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. That would be two undecillion dollars.

Complete Prisoner scripts - and more!

Zack writes, "Here's a collection of PDFs of ALL the original scripts to Patrick McGoohan's surreal cult classic, along with several unmade scripts and several multiple drafts of episodes. It's the next-best-thing to being in The Village, minus the brainwashing and evil weather balloons."

Stross on NSA network sabotage

"The same security holes that the NSA relied on to gain access to your (or Osama bin Laden's) email allowed gangsters to steal passwords and login credentials and credit card numbers. And ultimately these same baked-in security holes allowed Edward Snowden to rampage through their systems. The moral of the story is clear: be cautious about poisoning the banquet you serve your guests, lest you end up accidentally ingesting it."

Huge tech coalition asks FCC to save Net Neutrality

A massive consortium of technology companies ranging from Google, Facebook and Amazon to smaller publishers like Techdirt, have signed an open letter to the FCC opposing Chairman (and former cable lobbyist) Tom Wheeler's plan to allow ISPs to discriminate among Internet services, demanding bribes to deliver the data that we request.

Nebula Awards in San Jose May 15-18

Jill writes, "The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America's 49th Annual Nebula Awards Weekend is May 15-18, 2014 at the San Jose Marriott. You do not need to be a SFWA member to attend. We are delighted to announce that Samuel R. Delany will become SFWA's newest Grand Master. We're also pleased that Frank M. Robinson will be a Special Guest and that Ellen Klages is our Toastmaster." There's also an evening with Delany and Daryl Gregory that's free for attendees; otherwise it's $10 at the door.

Aurora Award nominees, including a performance from actual outer space

Brooke Abbey writes, "The 2014 Prix Aurora Award nominees have been announced! [Ed: this is the Canadian popular science fiction prize]. I am one of the nominees, in the fan music category, which this year also includes A MOTHERFUCKING ASTRONAUT - Chris Hadfield's awesome Space Oddity cover IN ACTUAL SPACE is nominated. Canadian SF fans, please take a moment to look smug about how cool we all are. Canadians with $10 can join CSFFA to get the voter package with delicious literature & more, coming out soon, and to, y'know, vote."

NSA spying means Brazil's $4.5B fighter jets won't be built by Boeing

Brazil's buying $4.5B worth of fighter jets. And rather than buy them from American military-industrial complex go-to Boeing, they're buying them from Sweden's Saab. Why? A contract with Boeing is synonymous with NSA surveillance. Multiply this by every country in the world and you start to get a sense of the cost of letting the NSA run around without any adult supervision. (via Techdirt)

Canada in decline

The Harper regime has dealt blow after blow to the values Canada holds dear: environmental responsibility, humanitarianism, fairness, transparency, and pluralism. But when you see it all laid out in one devastating indictment, it's still jarring. The fact that this indictment appears in a sober-sided journal like The Lancet only makes the barbs sink deeper. O, Canada.

RIAA to blame for impoverishment of artists it's using as human shield in anti-streaming lobbying

The RIAA and its captive collecting society Soundexchange are illegally lobbying for higher royalties from Internet streaming (despite the fact that companies like Pandora already give virtually all the money they take in to the labels), claiming that they're standing up for older artists. But, as Mike Masnick comprehensively establishes, these older artists have been impoverished by the RIAA, who "left them to rot" through abusive contracts, crooked accounting, and out-and-out theft.

Danish Geodata Agency commissions 1:1 Minecraft replica of Denmark

For the kids! (Thanks, Shi-n0-bi)

Students raise money, give away 300 copies of book banned in their school

Jaimie sez, "My bookstore helped a high school student distribute almost 300 free copies of "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie, a book that has been challenged and removed from the Meridian (Idaho) School District curriculum." Funds were raised by two Washington students." They're going to give away another 350 copies that the publisher donated next week. Go kids! (Thanks, Jamie!)

Syria's lethal Facebook checkpoints

An anonymous tip from a highly reliable source: "There are checkpoints in Syria where your Facebook is checked for affiliation with the rebellious groups or individuals aligned with the rebellion. People are then disappeared or killed if they are found to be connected. Drivers are literally forced to load their Facebook/Twitter accounts and then they are riffled through. It's happening daily, and has been for a year at least." Anyone have any corroboration for this?

SF in SF: Daniel Suarez and Andy Weir in San Francisco this Saturday

Rina writes, "Join SF in SF on Sat., April 12 for our author event! Authors Daniel Suarez (Influx) and Andy Weir (The Martian) will each read a selection from their work, followed by Q&A moderated by author Terry Bisson. Booksigning and schmoozing follows, with books for sale courtesy of Borderlands Books. The event will be podcasted by the Sword & Laser Podcast."

NSA spies on human rights groups, including those in the USA

During video testimony to the Council of Europe, whistleblower Edward Snowden reiterated that the NSA targets human rights groups, including those in the USA, for surveillance. It uses its Xkeyscore technology to "fingerprint" communications from these groups and targets them for deep surveillance. Groups that have been targeted in this way include UNICEF and many others.

Prosecutors wage war on judges who insist on fairness

When South Carolina State Supreme Court Justice Donald Beatty told a convention of prosecutors that judges would not permit "unethical conduct, such as witness tampering, selective and retaliatory prosecutions, perjury and suppression of evidence," prosecutors revolted, vilifying him. They're following the lead of San Diego prosecutors, who boycott judges who are to "pro-Fourth Amendment." And in Arizona, prosecutors are fighting an ethics rule that would require them to disclose "new, credible, and material evidence" of wrongful convictions.

LAPD officers sabotage their own voice-recorders: nothing to hide, nothing to fear?

The Los Angeles Police Department is trying to do something about its notoriously bad human rights record: it has equipped officers with belt-worn voice-recorders that feed tamper-evident uploading stations in their cruisers. Unfortunately for anyone who advocates for the basic honesty of the LAPD, these have been widely sabotaged by officers, with more than half of the receiver antennas being vandalized or removed, which sharply reduces the recorders' range. Boston cops reacted the same way when logging GPSes were added to their cars. As Washington University law prof Neil Richards notes, it's a pretty ironic turn, in that the cops apparently feel like being surveilled while going about their normal business is an unreasonable impingement on their freedom.

Yahoo beefs up security in two meaningful and important ways

Yahoo has taken some serious steps towards protecting user-privacy, writes the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Seth Schoen. After revelations that the NSA and GCHQ had hacked its services, intercepted private video-chats, and harvesting mass data from its fiber optic links, the company has added forward secrecy and STARTTLS to its roster of default-on security measures. Of the two, forward secrecy is the most interesting, as it protects the privacy of old intercepted Yahoo data even if the company loses control of its keys. Bravo, Yahoo!

UK Tories call for a national of slaves

Charlie Stross is on fire in this essay on the true meaning of the UK Exchequer George Osborne's promise to produce a Britain with 100% employment: he is proposing nothing less than a nation of slaves.

Daniel Ellsberg to keynote HOPE X in NYC this summer

2600 Magazine's Emmanuel Goldstein writes, "Acclaimed whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg will be keynoting at this summer's HOPE X conference in New York City. Ellsberg leaked the infamous Pentagon Papers, 7,000 pages of documents that wound up changing American history forever. Today's whistleblowers are treated far more harshly, both by the authorities and the mainstream media, often facing lengthly prison terms or a life on the run. Fortunately, Ellsberg has remained involved and connected. A whole new generation will hear his words in person and hopefully be inspired to reveal the truth from whatever corporate or government position they find themselves in."

When it comes to learning computers, play is seriously important

Game on? Or game over? [PDF], a brief research report from the U Washington Information School, summarizes some of the findings from the TASCHA report on computer skills acquisition. This particular explainer deals with the relationship between playing games and goofing off on computers and learning to do "productive" things with them, finding (as Mimi Ito did, before) that horsing around is a critical component of mastering computers, and that labs that ban games and other forms of playful engagement with computers are hampering their ability to teach the people they're supposed to be serving.

The Wil Wheaton Project: Talk Soup for Geeks

The wonderful, talented Wil Wheaton has landed a weekly show with SyFy, called the Wil Wheaton project: "a weekly roundup of the things I love on television and on the Internet, with commentary and jokes, and the occasional visit from interesting people who make those things happen. It’s sort of like Talk Soup for geeks." Congrats, Wil!