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PIFcamp: Slovenian art+technology in nature hackercamp

PIFcamp 2015 hikeMost hacker camps feature seminars, experimentation, and collaborative hands-on making—but very few integrate their natural environment as well as PIFcamp did.  Located in the lush mountainous beauty of Slovenia's national park, intense making was interspersed with walks, hikes and swims.  A prototype time-lapse camera documented the edible-food tour.  Once back at camp, plants that had been collected were chemically deconstructed in a makeshift bathroom biotech lab.  Experimental sounds were recorded as electric wires strung through wood heated it to a crackle.  Lynne Bruning has been working on speakers made from living plants.  So many other projects that I missed, but it's definitely on my calendar for next year!

Makery has a great report, and the official website has lots of pictures, too, and eventually should have more information on the projects.

Photos copyright 2015 by Katja Goljat, CC BY-ND

Slovenia's ambassador apologizes to her children and her nation for signing ACTA, calls for mass demonstrations in Ljubljana tomorrow

After Helena Drnovsek Zorko, Slovenia's ambassador to Japan, signed the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, she was deluged with emails from Slovenians criticizing her for signing onto the agreement, which encourages widespread network censorship and creates criminal penalties for copyright infringement. The ambassador read the agreement more closely and decided she agreed with the critics, and wrote an open letter of apology to her country for signing them up to the treaty.

The ambassador calls on Slovenians to converge on Ljubljana tomorrow, Saturday, Feb 4, to protest ACTA.

I signed ACTA out of civic carelessness, because I did not pay enough attention. Quite simply, I did not clearly connect the agreement I had been instructed to sign with the agreement that, according to my own civic conviction, limits and withholds the freedom of engagement on the largest and most significant network in human history, and thus limits particularly the future of our children. I allowed myself a period of civic complacency, for a short time I unplugged myself from media reports from Slovenia, I took a break from Avaaz and its inflation of petitions, quite simply I allowed myself a rest. In my defence, I want to add that I very much needed this rest and that I am still having trouble gaining enough energy for the upcoming dragon year. At the same time, I am tackling a workload that increased, not lessened, with the advent of the current year. All in line with a motto that has become familiar to us all, likely not only diplomats: less for more. Less money and fewer people for more work. And then you overlook the significance of what you are signing. And you wake up the following morning with the weight of the unbearable lightness of some signature.

First I apologised to my children. Then I tried to reply to those acquaintances and strangers who expressed their surprise and horror. Because there are more and more of them, I am responding to them publicly. I want to apologise because I carried out my official duty, but not my civic duty. I don’t know how many options I had with regard to not signing, but I could have tried. I did not. I missed an opportunity to fight for the right of conscientious objection on the part of us bureaucrats.

Full Text Of Slovenian Ambassador's Apology For Signing ACTA [via Techdirt]