Amtrak vs snow, in slow-mo

An Amtrak train pulls into a station somewhere up east. The only problem? The tracks are already occupied by snow, piled a good six inches higher than the platform itself. Commuter Nick Colvin knows what's about to happen and has his iPhone set to record slow-mo footage, but as he writes, there was "a more spectacular arrival than expected." Read the rest

Hand stuck to freezing metal? Urinate on it.

The US Navy's Polar Manual from 1965 may come in handy during this week's blizzards. From the list of "Polar Do's And Don't's":

1. Dares are neither offered nor taken. Necessary risks are bad enough.

25. Heavy and bulky polar clothing makes you clumsy and prone to accidents from lack of normal agility. Plan NOT to have an accident.

26. Do not touch cold metal with moist, bare hands. If you should inadvertently stick a hand to cold metal, urinate on the metal to warm it and save some inches of skin. If you stick both hands, you'd better have a friend along.

PDF: Polar Manual, Fourth Edition, 1965 (via Weird Universe)

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How to clear a road buried 60 feet in snow

Japan's Mt. Tateyama in the Hida Mountains is considered one of the snowiest spots on the planet. More than 125 feet of snow can fall on the region in a single year. Route 6 runs right through the Mt. Tateyama but just before you enter the tunnel, there's a 1/4 mile piece of highway called yuki-no-otani, or in English, Snow Canyon. The Toyama Prefectural Road Public Corporation is responsible for plowing the road after winter. It takes about a month. From Atlas Obscura:

At the Snow Canyon, the non-human star of the show is the HTR608, a rotary snow blower made by the Nichijo company—the 608 refers to the 608-horsepower engine. The HTR608 can plow through snow up to six feet high. The rotating bar helps pull snow into the machine, and a powerful propeller ejects it out of an aerodynamic pipe that can spray the snow nearly 50 feet high and half a football field to the side. But before this monster can even begin its job on the Snow Canyon, a series of prior snow-clearing events must take place.

Mt. Tateyama receives too much snow and is too remote to receive continual snow plow treatment, thus for much of the winter snow is allowed to bury the pass. Sometime in early March, a bulldozer specially equipped with both a GPS and a mobile satellite phone is sent up the mountain and over the Snow Canyon. The GPS and sat phone work in tandem to provide the driver a detailed video screen image of the dozer’s location in relation to the center of the snow-buried highway.

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‘Tis the season for 'Chicago dibs' on snow-shoveled parking spaces

With winter officially here, it’s time to revisit the unique practice that is “Chicago dibs.”

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Mysterious snowballs appear on Siberian beach

The Gulf of Ob is a remote Siberian reach of the Russian empire, and its beaches are covered in gigantic snowballs up to a meter across. The BBC reports that they're the result of a "rare environmental process where small pieces of ice form, are rolled by wind and water, and end up as giant snowballs." (Photo: SERGEI BYCHENKOV) Read the rest

Mount Washington Observatory shares video of man being blown away by 109-mph winds

The Mount Washington Observatory published this insane video from weather observers Mike Dorfman and Tom Padham demonstrating the effects of strong winds on top of a New Hampshire mountain.

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Backyard transformed into snow maze for dogs

Reddit user anneewannee shoveled a backyard snow labyrinth for dogs to play in! I hope they don't run into Jack Torrance.

(r/pics)

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Panda frolicking in snow at DC's National Zoo is all of us in #Blizzard2016

Panda. Snow. Floof-play. Didn't take long on #Blizzard2016 weekend for this video to go viral.

Tian Tian, an adult giant panda bear who lives at Smithsonian's National Zoo in Washington, DC enjoys rolling around in the snow after a winter storm dumped nearly two feet of the white stuff in the region.

Video: YouTube | Twitter.

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Veteran transforms wheelchair into snowplow

In wintry Omaha, Nebraska, a local veteran is using his modded wheelchair to help neighbors with snow plowing.

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#Blizzard2016: Big-ass winter storm hits East Coast with big snow predicted

Washington, D.C., and New York City are under blizzard watches, and states of emergency have been declared in Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina ahead of a blustery winter storm now slamming the U.S. East Coast with snow.

A large winter storm expected to bring heavy snowfall to the U.S. Mid-Atlantic on Jan. 22 and 23 in a Jan. 20, 2016 NASA photo.

The storm threatens to dump nearly 3 feet of snow on the Middle Atlantic region, and slammed into Washington, D.C. this afternoon, threatening our nation's capital with record accumulations. The storm is now moving up the East Coast and causing all sorts of problems in New York, and throughout the region.

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DK's Snow Sculptures

Duck Dynasty snow sculpture

In the small southwestern Wisconsin town of Lone Rock, Darren Klingaman makes fantastic painted snow sculptures on his lawn. Read the rest

WATCH: Snowing in Sligo Guy is the new Double Rainbow Guy

"Oh my God! There's snow everywhere! Snow! Look! Have you seen that, man? Whooooa! More snow outside, yeah! The little Buddha in the garden, he's got f*cking snow on his little hands!" Read the rest

Pile of "folded" snow

Recently in Montrose, Colorado, resident Cathy Hartt noticed snow falling off a slide had folded itself into a neat pile (7News). Read the rest

Snow vehicle, 1924

This film demonstrates a concept snow vehicle made in 1924 by Armstead Snow Motors in Michigan. "The concept is applied to a Fordson tractor and a Chevrolet automobile." Here's the patent! (via Accidental Mysteries) Read the rest

Frosty eats raccoon: the story of the carnivorous snowman

Here’s a great twist on the classic snowman theme: a bloody, carnivorous Frosty caught in the act of devouring a raccoon. It’s been an unusually cold and snowy winter in Cincinnati so it’s good to see that someone is making the most of it. I was driving my daughter home from a friend’s house when we saw it. Of course, I had to go back and get a picture, which I posted to my Instagram and Twitter feeds. When David asked about posting it to Boing Boing, I was happy but curiously apprehensive. Even though this guy sits in plain view of a busy intersection, I had walked right up to him to make the picture and now I was beginning to feel like I should have asked permission because I had ventured onto private property.

When I worked at a newspaper, we had clear rules for when you needed permission to publish a photo. If the subject of the photo was at public event (baseball game), or in a public place (park) or visible from a public place (street), it was understood that there was no expectation of privacy. An obvious exception would be a photo taken through the window of a private home even if taken from a public street. If you entered private property to make a picture, you got permission.

I find it interesting that I hadn’t thought about these issues with regard to social media. I haven’t shot professionally for a long time but I post regularly to Instagram and share my pictures on Twitter, Flickr and Facebook. Read the rest

DIY snowflake photography with old point-and-shoot

Russian photographer takes absolutely stunning photos of snowflakes on his balcony using an old point-and-shoot camera with a vintage USSR Helios lens mounted in reverse for extreme macro functionality. He describes his hacked rig and technique here: "Snowflakes, night city and other things"

More photos at Kljatov's Flickr stream: ChaoticMind75 (Thanks, Bob Pescovitz!)

 Science of snowflakes - Boing Boing How snowflakes get their shapes - Boing Boing Time-lapse video of lab-grown snowflakes - Boing Boing Read the rest

Snowflake electron microscope photos

Twisted Sifter has a great gallery of snowflake and ice crystal electron microscope photos. At this level of magnification, the ice looks like metal that has been machined by space aliens.

25 Microscopic Images of Snow Crystals Read the rest

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