Boing Boing 

"Reporter" who wrote ridiculous story about Snowden leaks in China admits he was just acting as a government stenographer

Tom Harper wrote the ridiculous cover story in the Sunday Times in which anonymous government sources claimed that the Russians and Chinese had somehow gained the power to decrypt copies of the files Edward Snowden took from the NSA, depite the fact that these files were never in Russia and despite the fact that the UK government claims that when criminals use crypto on their communications, the state is powerless to decrypt them.

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UK spies claim Russians know how to break the crypto they say is unbreakable, even on unavailable files

Mere moments after publications of an independent report condemning UK's mass surveillance programme, sources in the UK spy agencies -- who are pushing for massively expanded surveillance powers through the Snoopers' Charter -- leaked an evidence-free story claiming the Russians and Chinese had magically gained the ability to decrypt the files Snowden took with him from the NSA.

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US Government Office of Personnel Management has a second, much worse breach


The second attack is being blamed on Chinese state actors, and it netted the archives of Standard Form 86, which records applicants' mental illnesses, drug and alcohol use, past arrests and bankruptcies and lists of contacts and relatives.

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Anti-surveillance steamroller still rolling through Congress

The USA Freedom Act set the first legal limits on spying in a generation, and were immediately followed by 3 more surveillance-blocking amendments from the House, and now, a week later, there's 2 more bipartisan curbs on surveillance.

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Divining the capabilities of the FBI's ubiquitous spy aircraft


The FBI has filled the skies of America's cities with covert aircraft, crisscrossing overhead, bristling with sensors and cloaked in mystery, from the shell companies that own them to the obfuscated tail-numbers they sport.

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Edward Snowden, two years later: the world rejects surveillance

Writing in the NYT, Snowden celebrates the second anniversary of his disclosures by celebrating the "profound difference" in the surveillance debate since then.

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There was a David Cameron who swallowed a fly...

In my latest Guardian column, I talk about the real danger from the UK Tories' plan to ban effective cryptography: not the initial mandate forcing companies to help spy on their users, but all the things we'll have to do when that doesn't work.

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Mass surveillance versus medicare

Jon Stewart's on fire here, asking why the same Republican politicians who stuck up for the Patriot Act's invasive state surveillance to save hypothetical American lives were so violently opposed to state-sponsored health-care on the grounds that the state had no business poking its nose into your private health matters.

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UN rapporteur sticks up for crypto and anonymity

Within days of David Cameron's Queen's Speech promise to ban the use of effective crypto in the UK, David Kaye, the UN special rapporteur for Freedom of Expression effectively called this a plan to make UK into a rogue state.

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Hacktivist sees too much, FBI lock him up on child-porn charges, produce no evidence


Matthew DeHart, a veteran from a multi-generational military/intelligence family, ran a Tor hidden service server for his Wow guildies, members of his old army unit, and whistleblowers.

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Today's terrifying Web security vulnerability, courtesy of the 1990s crypto wars

The Logjam bug allows attackers to break secure connections by tricking the browser and server to communicate using weak crypto -- but why do browsers and servers support weak crypto in the first place?

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NSA wanted to hack the Android store

A newly published Snowden leak reveals that the NSA planned to hack the Android store so that it could covertly install malware on its targets' phones.

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FBI spies on tar sands opponents under banner of "national security"


They've followed Canada's RCMP in classifying tar sands opponents as threats to national security and fair game for intense surveillance.

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150 orgs, experts and companies tell Obama: hands off crypto!


The joint letter from human rights organizations, eminent cryptographers, tech companies and trade associations takes aim at the FBI's ever-louder calls to ban the use of effective cryptography.

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Librarians: privacy's champions


Libraries have always been places where people gathered for intellectual inquiry, where communities could form around emerging ideologies that challenged the status quo.

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What did the courts just do to NSA spying?


When a panel of federal judges from the Second Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the NSA's bulk-phone records spying program was illegal, it was a legal game-changer, but what, exactly, does it all mean?

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