A doctor responds to Seth Roberts' guest post about tonsillectomy

We recently ran a guest post by Seth Roberts, detailing the case against tonsillectomies as a regularly prescribed treatment for sore throats. I was able to read Roberts' post before it went up here, and comment on it. And Roberts made several changes to the post, which I had suggested, before it ran.

In general, I'm a big fan of basing medical treatment on evidence, rather than conjecture, tradition, or mythology. And, while I have a big problem with woo-woo (shorthand for attempts at medical treatment that are based primarily on conjecture, tradition, and mythology), I do think it's important to point out that woo-woo doesn't always come from hippies. Local doctors don't always follow the evidence, either. In fact, that's one big reason why "evidence-based medicine" has to be called that, rather than just medicine. So while I didn't agree with everything Roberts had to say, I thought his key point—tonsillectomy as a treatment for sore throats isn't actually strongly supported by evidence—was a valuable one.

That said, I R NOT A MEDICAL EXPERT. And neither is Roberts. Steven Novella, however, is a medical doctor and a clinical researcher. He has a very good blog post up that points out some important flaws in Roberts post. Here's the gist of what he has to say: Roberts seems to have misunderstood some of the studies he linked to, and assigned too much importance to others. "Evidence" can mean a range of different things. Some evidence is better than others. Read the rest