Boing Boing 

Plastic toys often used to illustrate Eurozone finance stories

Every editor has their favorite way to cheaply generate art for stories with no visual component. Arranging little plastic toys in a cute tableaux is among the classier alternatives to stock art—especially when it comes to the exciting world of international finance.

The current cover design theory at Bloomberg offers a particularly refined version of this school of imagery, unusually comfortable with the absurdity of trying to make this kind of journalism visually engaging.

Pictured above is a photo by Getty Images' Sean Gallup, an emerging master of the genre whose arrangements wed the same ironic self-awareness with genuine storytelling skill.

Hey, it beats the alternative: photos of coins.

Women struggling to drink water

The Hairpin has a gallery of stock art of women who are unable to accurately pour water into their own mouths.

How to Paint Shutterstock image #774846

Photo: Sascha Burkard. Top good result at you know where! Previously: Is this the new face of jazz or Getty Images stock photo #LS008662 [The Onion]

Hacker stock art

All photos: Shutterstock and Reuters.

Problem: Until they're captured, alleged hackers don't make for stories with good art. But readers won't look at words unless they are immediately adjacent to pictures. Solution: stock art! I am delighted to report that there is an abundance of stock art geared toward illustrating news stories about cybercrime.

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