Boing Boing 

Edward Snowden, two years later: the world rejects surveillance

Writing in the NYT, Snowden celebrates the second anniversary of his disclosures by celebrating the "profound difference" in the surveillance debate since then.

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House easily passes further anti-surveillance amendments


The USA Freedom Act was a very timid curb on surveillance powers, but it was also the first time since the 1970s that Congress limited spies' powers -- and it won't be the last.

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There was a David Cameron who swallowed a fly...

In my latest Guardian column, I talk about the real danger from the UK Tories' plan to ban effective cryptography: not the initial mandate forcing companies to help spy on their users, but all the things we'll have to do when that doesn't work.

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USA Freedom Act: the good, the bad, and what's next


With the sunsetting of Section 215 of the Patriot Act and the passage of the USA Freedom Act, Congress has, for the first time since the 1970s, put limits on the surveillance powers of America's spooks.

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Mass surveillance versus medicare

Jon Stewart's on fire here, asking why the same Republican politicians who stuck up for the Patriot Act's invasive state surveillance to save hypothetical American lives were so violently opposed to state-sponsored health-care on the grounds that the state had no business poking its nose into your private health matters.

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Facebook rolls out new encryption features

Reuters


Reuters

An update rolled out today by Facebook allows users to post their public email encryption key on their Facebook profile, so others can encrypt future emails to that user. Here's the official blog post at Facebook.

More at CPJ:

Facebook profiles now have a field for PGP public keys--just like for phone numbers or email addresses. Uploaded keys can be shared as widely or narrowly as desired, just like other information on a Facebook profile. For journalists who use Facebook to connect with sources and disseminate, share, and comment on news, their profile will now indicate they are available for encrypted emails. The new feature will also make it easier to securely contact potential sources.

A sample display of the new encryption feature offered to users by Facebook.


A sample display of the new encryption feature offered to users by Facebook.

"Status update: Facebook users now have access to PGP encryption" and "CPJ welcomes Facebook move to add PGP encryption features" [Committee to Protect Journalists]

"Securing Email Communications from Facebook" [Facebook]

NSA can't legally surveil Americans' every phone call, for now. Thanks, Edward Snowden.

GARY CAMERON/REUTERS


GARY CAMERON/REUTERS

nsa-eagle_0

Today is a big day for privacy in the United States: each of us can now call our mom, our best friend, or a pizza delivery service without the NSA automatically keeping a record of who we called, when, and how long the conversation lasts.

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PATRIOT Act expires -- now what?

For the first time since its passage in 2001, Congress has declined to renew section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act, which provided for mass, warrantless surveillance -- now what happens?

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The PATRIOT Act is uglier than you thought, and what to do about it

The most outstanding and urgent hour of audio you'll hear this week is the On the Media history of the PATRIOT Act (MP3), and the most important website you'll visit this week is Sunset the PATRIOT Act, which lets you do something about it.

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How metadata compromises you

"It's only metadata," is the catch-all excuse for mass surveillance -- after all, if spies aren't capturing what your message says why should you care if they're getting who sent it, what its subject line is, where you and the sender are, and everything you do before and after receiving the message?

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If you want a picture of the future, imagine a Roomba leaking pix of your home, forever

The game-plan for future Roombas may fit them with cameras that send images of your home to a remote service that identifies obstacles and lets the little robots clean around them -- what could possibly go wrong?

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Ron Wyden and Rand Paul kill the Patriot Act (ish)


After an all-night session, Rand Paul [R-KY] and Ron Wyden [D-OR] tag-teamed majority leader Mitch McConnell [R-KY] and beat him to the mat -- he has abandoned the current legislative effort to extend section 215 of the Patriot Act, which authorizes mass surveillance and is set to expire on June 1.

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Which Colombian ISPs keep your data private?


Karen from the Electronic Frontier Foundation writes, "EFF is teaming up with groups in Latin America to take our 'Who Has Your Back' report international!"

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Today's terrifying Web security vulnerability, courtesy of the 1990s crypto wars

The Logjam bug allows attackers to break secure connections by tricking the browser and server to communicate using weak crypto -- but why do browsers and servers support weak crypto in the first place?

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NSA wanted to hack the Android store

A newly published Snowden leak reveals that the NSA planned to hack the Android store so that it could covertly install malware on its targets' phones.

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FBI spies on tar sands opponents under banner of "national security"


They've followed Canada's RCMP in classifying tar sands opponents as threats to national security and fair game for intense surveillance.

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150 orgs, experts and companies tell Obama: hands off crypto!


The joint letter from human rights organizations, eminent cryptographers, tech companies and trade associations takes aim at the FBI's ever-louder calls to ban the use of effective cryptography.

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