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Iconic film/TV characters 'shooped with tattoos

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Cheyene Randall's Tumblr of "Shopped Tattoos." (Thanks, Gil Kaufman!)

Tattoo mistake

Famous, respected UK journalist and TV presenter David Dimbleby, 75, recently got his first ink: of a six-legged scorpion. Unfortunately, scorpions are arachnids, with eight legs. The scramble is on to identify a face-saving species that the tattoo could represent: the best bet so far is the Whip Scorpion, which has six good legs and two crappy, vestigial ones used as feelers; and various scorpion-esque arthropods.

The tattoo work of Wan Tattooer


The World's Best Ever has been showcasing tattoo artists in a series called Flash Us, and they brought to my attention the work of Wan Tattooer, who works at Wild Rose Tattoo in Seoul, South Korea. His Instagram feed is terrific!

Angry monkey scalp-tattoo


An anonymous Internet fellow had the back of his scalp tattooed with a rather fetching angry monkey. I'm not sure if he had his head shaved and inked, or if this is male-pattern baldness, but I would appreciate any background you could provide in our comments.

(via Geekologie)

Alice on a ladder, reaching for a book tattoo


No idea where this Tennielesque back tattoo featuring Alice on a ladder confronting a higgeldy-piggeldy tower of books came from (do you know?) but it's magnelephant.

ink (via That Book Smell)

Tokyo tattoo tights


Tokyo Fashion Diaries reports on "tattoo stockings" that are apparently hot items this summer. They make their wearers appear to have elaborate tattoos up and down their legs -- a lower-limb twist on the tattoo sleeve shirts.

TATTOO STOCKINGS ARE STILL BOOMING IN JAPAN. HERE ARE SOME OF THE COOLEST (AND WEIRDEST?) FOR THIS SUMMER (translation)

(via Crazy Abalone)

Tattoo of the ARPAnet as it stood in 1971


Matt Senate has a tattoo of the ARPAnet as it stood in 1971 -- ARPAnet being the lineal ancestor of the modern Internet. The photo here is from Cyrus Farivar. Here's some relevant Wikipedia verbiage:

In March 1970, the ARPANET reached the East Coast of the United States, when an IMP at BBN in Cambridge, Massachusetts was connected to the network. Thereafter, the ARPANET grew: 9 IMPs by June 1970 and 13 IMPs by December 1970, then 18 by September 1971 (when the network included 23 university and government hosts); 29 IMPs by August 1972, and 40 by September 1973. By June 1974, there were 46 IMPs, and in July 1975, the network numbered 57 IMPs. By 1981, the number was 213 host computers, with another host connecting approximately every twenty days.[15]

In 1973 a transatlantic satellite link connected the Norwegian Seismic Array (NORSAR) to the ARPANET, making Norway the first country outside the US to be connected to the network. At about the same time a terrestrial circuit added a London IMP.[18]

Last Friday, I met @wrought at the @techliminal party. Dude has a tattoo of the 1971 ARPAnet!

Knuckles that promote literacy


Spotted today at a Toronto restaurant: a great, pro-literacy set of knuckle-tatts.

READ MORE knuckles, Fresh, Crawford Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Librarian tattoos


On Mental Floss, Jill Harness's collection of librarian tattoos. Above, Elizabeth Skene's card-catalog sleeve, by Frank William of the Chicago Tattoo Company. Right, Michelle's super-librarian tattoo, chosen to represent her career as a high-school librarian, based on Mary Marvel, and done by Chris Cockrill of Avalon II Tattoo.

11 Amazing Librarian Tattoos (via Making Light)

Zombie T-Rex tattoo


Megan, a cake designer, sports her wonderful zombie/T-Rex tattoo. It was inked by Jeff Addz at Generation X in Daytona Beach, Florida, who worked freehand.

Zombie T-Rex Tattoo Shoulder Tattoo (via Geekologie)

Nacho-related tattoos


Nachos NY -- a site celebrating the nacho in all its glory -- has produced three temporary nacho-related tattoos for your delectation.

Nacho Tattoos (via Craft)

Tiny, behind-the-ear R2D2 tattoo


Found on Fuck Yeah, Tattoos, an adorable behind-the-ear droid

R2D2 (via The Mary Sue)

Otzi the Iceman and life after death

In Science Ink, Carl Zimmer's new book collecting photos of cool science tattoos and the stories behind them, there's a photo of a guy who got tattoos to match those found on Otzi, aka The Iceman, who died more than 5,000 years ago in the Italian Alps.

Mike Goldstein, the guy who got the tattoo, said the series of 10 simple lines arranged in groups of four, three, and three served to remind him that you don't have to be incredibly important during your lifetime in order to be important. "It reminds me that I can live however I want," he says in the book. "I don't have to work in an office or wear a tie, as are the expectations of our culture. I can walk across the Alps and die in a swamp, and that's OK."

I was reminded of that quote today, while reading my news stream. There's no evidence that Otzi was a particularly important figure to his culture. But here we are, thousands of years later, still debating the minutia of how he died. Emily Sohn writes about new Otzi research for Discover News:

...new analyses have revealed that a deep cut likely led to heavy bleeding in the man's eye. In the cold, high-altitude conditions where he was found, that kind of injury would have been tough to recover from.

The official opinion remains that an arrow in his left shoulder was the cause of death for Ötzi. But the new study raises the possibility -- for some, at least -- that he fell over after being shot by an arrow. And, at higher than 10,000 feet in elevation, his alpine fall may have made the situation much worse.

"Maybe he fell down or maybe he had a fight up there, nobody knows," said Wolfgang Recheis, a physicist in the radiology department at the University of Innsbruck in Austria. "With this cut alone, at 3,250 meters, it would have been a deadly wound up there. Bleeding to death in the late afternoon when it was getting cold up there, this could be really dangerous."

Granted, most of us have a better chance of making an impact after our deaths by helping other people during our lives. Or by donating our bodies to science. But it's still interesting to think about all that could happen to you thousands of years after you're gone.

Tattoos by food lovers

eggtattoo.jpeg The OC Weekly has photos of a dozen individuals who love a certain type of food so much that they got tattoos of it. Here, a man whose head is covered with eggs, bacon, and hash browns.

One dozen unique food tattoos [via NotCot]