PocketLab: a $100 scientific "Swiss Army knife"


The PocketLab is billed as a "Swiss Army Knife of science." Launched via Kickstarter, the small device contains numerous sensors to measure acceleration, force, angular velocity, magnetic field, pressure, altitude, and temperature and send that data to smartphones or laptops. According to inventor Clifton Roozeboom, it's a tool for students and citizen scientists who can't afford to spend tens of thousands of dollars on lab equipment and will get the data they need from this $100 gadget. From IEEE Spectrum:

“If you are doing a classic experiment in AP physics, you might have, say, a track and a pulley and you want to attach a sensor to a cart to measure acceleration, force, and momentum transfer,” says Roozeboom. “The typical gear available is wired, plugs into a specialized handheld gadget with a host of menus to navigate. The students spend a lot of time understanding how to use the gear instead of learning concepts.” In other traditional physics experiments, Roozeboom says, the device can be attached to a rocket to study projectile motion, stuck to a pendulum to look at harmonic motion, or placed inside a tube to measure changes in pressure with volume.

Video demo: Read the rest

Ambient weather report display generates rain, lightning, sunshine in a box

Ambient displays translate online information into a simple presentation that's meant to be glanceable, easy to understand, and non-intrusive. I've always appreciate artistic ambient displays, like Nancy Patterson's Stock Market Skirt and Eric Paulos's Limelight. Ken Kawamoto's Tempescope appears to be another wonderful example. It's a weather display in the form of a transparent box that generates the predicted weather conditions inside. For example, when the forecast is rain, a tiny rain storm occurs in the Tempescope. It can even form "clouds" and create a "lightning" storm through flashing LEDs. Kawamoto created an open source version of the Tempescope so you can make your own, or get one through the Indiegogo campaign launching this week!

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Why students are forced to buy this expensive and obsolete Texas Instruments calculator


Twenty years ago, Texas Instruments released the TI-83 graphing calculator, a stupidly expensive piece of old technology that most high schools still require their juniors and seniors buy for around $100. Why? Because. That's why. From Mic.com:

Pearson textbooks feature illustrations of TI-series calculators alongside chapters so students can use their TI calculator in conjunction with the lesson plan. The calculators also have a significant learning curve, and moving students over to new technology is a risky proposition when success in the classroom is so tied to the technology being used.

TI calculators have been a constant, essential staple in the slow-moving public education sector. Students and teachers are so used to generations of students learning the familiar button combos and menu options that TI provides a computer program that perfectly resembles the button layout of the TI-83.

However, even if teachers wanted to be bold and bring in better technology, they would end up right back at square one because of that infamous force in American education: standardized testing.

College Board and other companies that administer the country's standardized tests have approved lists of calculators. TI-series devices are ubiquitous — mobile apps are nowhere to be found.

"I'm actually at the point now where when I do parent conferences, I tell the parents it's in their students' best interest to buy one, because the device will become necessary," Bob Lochel, a math teacher in Hatboro, Pennsylvania, told Mic. "But you feel dirty, because you're telling parents they need to buy a device, and I know I can teach without it."

"Remember Your Old Graphing Calculator? Read the rest

Watch these drones build a rope bridge you could actually walk across


This video is amazing, and feels like something that will become even more graceful, precise, and normal as drone technology and design improve.

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Yet another pre-installed spyware app discovered on Lenovo computers


A factory refurbished Thinkpad shipped with Windows 7 and a scheduler app that ran once a day, collecting usage data about what you do with your computer and exfiltrating it to an analytics company. Read the rest

First issue of new feminist hacker zine


Audrey writes, "The Recompiler is a new feminist hacker magazine dedicated to learning about technology in a fun and inclusive way. The first issue of the magazine is now online, with articles about glitchy art, 80s tech, SSL bugs, and the flaws in DNS." Read the rest

The sad truth about your computer


Another XKCD bullseye for Randall Munroe. It's all just a tangle of things you put in to fix the things that you put in to fix the things. As the tooltip says: Read the rest

The antique tech shortage that hurts the vinyl boom

As the vinyl record resurgence continues, the problem is that there simply aren't enough record pressing plants to meet the demand. Indie labels get pushed to the back of the line when the majors place a big order. Read the rest

Hypnotically captivating video of CGI Silly Putty

"There's something mesmerizing about watching little dragons made of semi-viscous cookie batter falling helplessly into heaps and melting into each other."

What it's like to be black and work in tech

Why aren’t there more Black people roaming the campuses of technology companies? Mark S. Luckie has some ideas.

A better solution for astronauts who drink their own piss


Aquaporin A/S made this new small and lightweight filter that uses aquaporins, membrane proteins, to turn urine, sweat, and wastewater into drinkable water. Read the rest

Robots wish you a happy Rosh Hashanah!


A robotic Shanah Tovah (Happy New Year!) from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology! Read the rest

3D printing beautiful glass structures


MIT researchers developed a new system for 3D printing transparent, colored, and strong glass structures from digital files. Read the rest

Nanotechnology coming of age (finally)?


For more than two decades, nonscientists and engineers have made molecular-scale motor, switches, propellers, ratchets, and even the "nanocar" above that rolls when its metal "road" is heated. But what can we actually do with these things? The journal Nature looks at today's efforts to develop useful applications for molecular machines, from drug delivery systems inside the body to a new kind of high-density molecular memory for computers. Read the rest

Car cassette slot mistaken for iPhone dock, and also the real deal

A "young driver" reportedly stopped in a car dealership service department "complaining that the iPhone dock in his (old) vehicle isn't working and its scratching his phone..." Read the rest

Business is "better than ever" for the last audio cassette factory


"I think you could characterize our operating model as stubbornness and stupidity," says Steve Stepp, president of National Audio Company. Read the rest

In Google's new logo, serifs a no-go

It's all about looking better on increasingly smaller devices.

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