Tech Review's annual science fiction issue, edited by Bruce Sterling, featuring William Gibson


The summer annual features stories "inspired by the real-life breakthroughs covered in the pages of MIT Technology Review," including "Petard," my story about hacktivism; and "Death Cookie/Easy Ice," an excerpt from William Gibson's forthcoming (and stone brilliant) futuristic novel The Peripheral.

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Digital tools have a mind of their own: yours

Clive Thompson says that there are three principal biases that today’s digital tools introduce to human thought.

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Affecting sculpture about our relationship to technology


Soheyl Bastami's Extreme: an Iranian sculptor's beautiful and trenchant take on our relationship to technology.

(via Super Punch)

Can technology become a force for global equality, or is the future destined to remain unfair?

Here's video from a debate I participated in at last summer's Howthelightgetsin festival in Wales, with the BBC's Kate Russell and Steve Fuller, an advocate for creationism and transhumanism, who said some pretty silly things, as you might expect.

Video: Hollywood depictions of texting and the Internet

By Tony Zhou.

Neal Stephenson and Cory speaking at Seattle's Town Hall, Oct 26


We're getting together to talk about Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future , a project that Stephenson kicked off -- I've got a story in it called "The Man Who Sold the Moon."

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Face tracking + projection mapping = very strange

credit: Nobumichi Asai

Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow?

Brian Fies‘s 2012 graphic novel Whatever Happened to the World of Tomorrow? expresses a beautiful, melancholic and hopeful longing for (and suspicion of) the futuristic optimism of America’s 20th century, starting with the 1939 World’s Fair. Cory Doctorow finally got caught up with the future and read it.

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Wurthering Bytes: UK tech festival in the Pennines


It's family-friendly, only £10/day, including lunch, and features an outstanding and fascinating array of speakers, as well as live music and a hardware-hacking bag for attendees.

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The history of botched executions

The first use of the electric chair was both an official success and a horrific example of what can happen when the technology of executions doesn't work the way we expect it to.

Touchless trash cans in a loop

Touchless trash cans caught in an infinite loop. The laughter is infectious! (@rynbtmn)

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"Ukraine fighter jet took out MH17" debunked

If they did it, they didn't use an SU-25. [Locklin on science]

The horrible seating configuration Airbus wants to patent

airbus-bike-seats-leg-room

Here's the patent application. The "good" news: It's just conceptual. Regulators wouldn't let Ryanair sell standing room tickets, so maybe this would be banned as well?

Threading the RCA Projector (1950s)

Another important skill lost to history. (via Weird Universe)

How GM silenced its whistleblowers

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The cover of Bloomberg Businessweek this week riffs on a classic Vietnam-era Esquire cover. Sometimes, words speak louder than pictures.