Bite Me! Check out the Japanese gameshow behind the memes

This is not new news, it’s old news. But maybe you haven’t seen it, and it’s so nutty that I feel compelled, with a box of Williams Sonoma Peppermint Chocolate Bark sitting open in front of me, to share this with you.

It’s a Japanese game show where a curtain is whisked open to reveal a room, and the contestants are shown items in that room, such as a shoe or a picture frame, or a table, or a plant, that are highly unlikely to be edible. They are asked to guess if it’s edible or not and then bite it.

Oddly, some of the items turn out to be stunning edible versions of things you would never consider chomping on. The video will give you a chuckle … just don’t take a bite out of anyone sitting next to you. I take no responsibility if your significant other mistakes you for one of the walking dead.

Via Kotaku Read the rest

Millennials have discovered antennas will give them free TV channels

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that millennials have learned how to get free TV with a simple antenna, for a one-time cost of about $20. Us old-schoolers have known of this ancient wisdom since, well, forever but have neglected to pass down to the young'uns.

But the crazy thing is that it's not just young folks, the Journal consulted an industry group who estimate about a third of all Americans don't realize that local channels are free:

Let’s hear a round of applause for TV antennas, often called “rabbit ears,” a technology invented roughly seven decades ago, long before there was even a cord to be cut, which had been consigned to the technology trash can along with cassette tapes and VCRs.

The antenna is mounting a quiet comeback, propelled by a generation that never knew life before cable television, and who primarily watch Netflix , Hulu and HBO via the internet. Antenna sales in the U.S. are projected to rise 7% in 2017 to nearly 8 million units, according to the Consumer Technology Association, a trade group.

There is typically no need to climb on a rooftop. While some indoor antennas still look like old-fashioned rabbit ears, many modern antennas are thin sheets that can be hidden behind a flat TV or hung like a picture frame.

And, these modern ones are paintable... (?!)

Of course, if the commercials are getting to you, there's always this alternative:

Thanks, Laura!

Rabbit ear image via Amazon, smashed TV gif via Giphy Read the rest

Every "That's what she said" joke from The Office

This left me very satisfied. (ahem)

(via Laughing Squid)

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Family Guy tribute to Adam West

Family Guy's wonderful tribute to the late great Mayor of Quahog, Mr. Adam West.

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Would you kill to stop an asteroid panic? I asked the creators of Salvation

In six months, a large asteroid is going to hit Earth. It's likely that everyone is going to die. Only a few people know about it, and they are desperately trying to stop it from slamming into the planet. That's the premise of Salvation, a new suspense thriller TV series premiering on CBS this Wednesday, July 12, 2017. Carla and I got an early look at the first episode, and we both loved it for the premise, sense of urgency, moral issues explored, and hints that more is unfolding than meets the eye. Our friends Elizabeth Kruger and Craig Shapiro created the show, so I grabbed them for a quick interview to ask them about what went into making a series that deals with people secretly trying to save humankind.

Mark: What's the conflict in Salvation?

Liz: An asteroid is going to collide with Earth in 186 days, and if our government and/or others don't come up with new technology to solve the problem, we're going to go the way of the dinosaurs. Adding to that conflict is other countries that are also looking into how to solve the problem, and what do you do if the world itself cannot agree on how to solve a problem? And if you solve it on one side of the world what problems does it create for the other side of the world?

Mark: So if the different countries' solutions don't necessarily work in harmony with each other, they could actually conflict with each other. Read the rest

Grotbags dead at 74

Actress and entertainer Carol Lee Scott died this week at 74. Britons of a certain age will remember 1980s' TV witch Grotbags; Americans of any age are in for a bizarre treat.

Her character Grotbags was a dastardly pantomime witch, with a bright green wig and face to match. She famously hated "brats" and did her best to spoil the fun of children, using her "Bazazzer" - a pointy stick with a gold hand on the end of it.

Fans of the show flooded Twitter with comments, with Gary Dewar writing: "Daleks. Zelda. Skeletor. Nothing - NOTHING - terrified me quite like Grotbags. Bravo!"

Noob added: "Rest in peace Grotbags. You made my early years awesome. I was so scared of you!" ... The show, set in the Gloomy Fortress, also starred puppeteer Richard Coombs.

Here she is presenting a ghoulish game show with her gay robot:

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All the inside jokes in Silicon Valley's opening title sequence

Silicon Valley is a family favorite. It really nails startup culture, and every episode seems to raise the stakes. The opening title sequence is a 10-second animation of the growth and collapse of different software companies in Silicon Valley. It seems to change from episode-to-episode. It's hard to see everything that's going on, but this guy has studied it closely and reported what he found. Read the rest

Bat-Signal to shine over Los Angeles in memory of Adam West

The iconic bat-signal will shine on the tower of Los Angeles City Hall tonight in memory of Adam West, the (best) Batman actor who died on Saturday. L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetii and L.A. Police Department Chief Charlie Beck will flip the switch at 9pm at City Hall. From the Hollywood Reporter:

For fans who can't make it to the ceremony, West's family is encouraging people to donate to the Adam West Memorial Fund for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Donations can also be made to Camp Rainbow Gold, an Idaho-based charity for children battling cancer.

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Watch Parks And Rec’s Jim O’Heir play with puppies and kittens

Because sometimes you just need to watch something that’s purely good, The A.V. Club invited Parks And Recreation’s Jim O’Heir (a.k.a. Jerry a.k.a. Larry a.k.a Terry) to play with some puppies and kittens at PAWS Chicago. You can learn more, make a donation, and even adopt a pet on the PAWS Chicago website. Read the rest

Is binge watching bad for you?

AsapSCIENCE digs into a question you might not want to know the answer to. Read the rest

Anderson Cooper rolls his eyes

Does Shep Smith ever roll his eyes? Asking for a friend. Read the rest

Andy Warhol, Salvador Dali, Sonny Liston, and Whitey Ford's TV commercials for Braniff Airline

When you got it... flaunt it.

"As we eavesdrop on these odd couples trying to outflaunt each other, we hear everything that has to be said about Braniff (International airlines)," wrote famed designer and adman George Lois of his 1968 campaign for . "We also imply that you might bump into a celebrity or two on a Braniff flight...They are not idealized celebrities—they are famous people who are portrayed as lovable extroverts, combined to radiate a surreal kind of believability."

(r/ObscureMedia and Dangerous Minds)

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The X-Files is coming back

Fox (Broadcasting Company, not Mulder) announced that ten new episodes of the X-Files will air in 2017 and 2018. Last year's excellent six-episode mini-series was a fantastic teaser of what's to come. Trust no one.

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Mystery Science Theater 3000 does Stranger Things

Here we go, "into the grayish brownish world of the early 80s..."

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St. Elsewhere and the snow globe ending

An all-star cast, brave writers, and a catchy theme made St. Eleswhere a phenomenal medical drama. In the final moments of the series finale, however, a twist was introduced wherein a minor character, the autistic son of one of the lead doctors, imagined the events of the entire series.

Starting with a cross-over on Homicide, it turns out Tommy Westphall likely imagined vast amounts of our television landscape. As of August 2016 there were 49 shows airing with connections to St. Elsewhere.

The folks at Tommy Westphall Universe track it all. Read the rest

Shark Tank tonight: Ingenious pop-up shelter invented by Pesco's brother

Under The Weather is a single-person pop-up shelter to sit inside that my big brother Rick came up with a while back. (He was sick of getting soaked at his kids' soccer games and was inspired by a portable toilet he saw by the field.) Under The Weather is designed for spectator sports, fishing, and other outdoor events where it's raining, windy, or cold, but you are either obligated to watch or having so much fun you don't want to leave.

Tonight, Rick and his wife/partner Kelly present the product on Shark Tank! No matter what happens, I can guarantee it will be very entertaining. I'm so proud of them!

And if you want one, don't be fooled by crappy knock-offs. Please buy directly from Rick and Kelly here: Under the Weather

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Tribute to Mary Ann from Gilligan's Island

No, she's not dead. But over at Neatorama, actor Eddie Deezen wrote a delightful tribute to Dawn Wells who from 1964 to 1967 famously played Mary Ann, one of seven stranded castaways there on Gilligan's Island. Of course during the first season of the show, she (and the professor) weren't even named in the theme song, having been unfairly lumped in under "and the rest." But for the many young people who didn't dig the movie star, Mary Ann was the down-to-earth object of their affection. From Neatorama:

In 1964, Dawn auditioned for a new show on the CBS schedule called Gilligan's Island. She met with the show's creator, Sherwood Schwartz, where the two chatted about the character she was up for- Mary Ann Summers, a farm girl from Kansas (based on Judy Garland's "Dorothy" character in The Wizard of Oz.) Before officially testing for the role, her agent/husband Larry called and asked how Sherwood liked her. He was told, "She's too smart to play Mary Ann," to which he replied, "She can play dumb."

When Dawn heard of this conversation, she quickly disagreed. "Mary Ann's not dumb," she declared, "She's not very experienced, she's kind of naive, but she's not dumb." It was as if she already fully understood the character she was to make immortal, before she even had the role.

Trivia: Another young, beautiful actress named Raquel Welch was also up for for the Mary Ann role....

And here's Wells on a couple of her castmates:

Jim Backus (Mr.

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