Universal, CC-licensed mobile phone charging dock

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Eirik writes, "I like those old charging docks for mobile phones. But the problem is that you need to buy a new one every time your phone change. And it won't fit if you use a cover on your phone. So I just designed a dock that can be adapted to almost any phone." Read the rest

Artists troll Thingiverse with 3D model mashup bot

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Shiv Integer is a bot created by artists Matthew Plummer-Fernandez and Julien Deswaef; it downloads Creative Commons-licensed models from Thingiverse, mashes them up into weird and often amazing new shapes, adds machine-generated titles and descriptions to them, and posts them. Read the rest

3D printed battle-armor for cats

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Carrying on the ancient, honorable tradition of armoring your cat, Print That Thing designed a suit of 3D printable cat armor and uploaded it to Thinigverse for anyone to download and print. Read the rest

A digital, 3D printed sundial whose precise holes cast a shadow displaying the current time

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Julldozer created an amazingly clever digital sundial ("Cadran Solaire Numérique") that precomputes the angle of the sun throughout the day and uses those computations to make hundreds of precise holes calibrated to cast a shadow displaying the present time. Read the rest

3D printed, open-source "pocket watch" with tourbillon

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Swiss engineer Christoph Laimer has built an open-source hardware, 3D printed watch with a tourbillon mechanism, uploading it to Thingiverse for you to print and assemble yourself. Read the rest

3D printed Immortan Joe mask

Andrew writes, "I made Immortan Joe's mask from Mad Max: Fury Road!" Read the rest

3D printed T-Rex shower head

JM Schwartz's 3D printable T-Rex shower head is just about the best thing I've seen all week. It's a mashup of a T-Rex skull produced by Makerbot Academy and Schwartz's own shower-head design. Read the rest

HOWTO make a low-poly Kim Jong Un Hallowe'en head

Tim writes, "I made a giant wearable low-polygon Kim Jong Un head for Halloween, and you should too!" Read the rest

3D printed book of bas relief from Art Institute of Chicago

Tom Burtonwood sez, "I have just published Folium, a 3D printed book of bas relief from the Art Institute of Chicago; it's posted to thingiverse for download: 12 pages, 9 scans featuring works of art spanning over 2000 years, from the Ancient Egyptians to Louis Sullivan department store decorations." Read the rest

Disneyland rarities and Imagineering goodies to 3D print

Grant Fowler, an Imagineering enthusiast, has a marvellous Thingiverse account full of fascinating historical Disneyland items to download and print. Read the rest

Eggbot design: Pi Egg for Pi Day

Tomorrow, 3/14, is Pi Day in the USA (it will not be Pi Day in the rest of the world until the Martian Emperor subjugates us all to his sinister 14-month calendar). In celebration, Thingiverse user Thor4231 posted this great Eggbot design, ready to be automatically sharpied onto your favorite ovum by means of the wonderful Eggbot printer.

Pi Egg for Pi Day Read the rest

Makerbot announces three new 3D printers, including a massive 47.5cm tall monster

Yesterday at CES, Makerbot CEO Bre Pettis announced three new 3D printers, including a massive, fifth-generation Replicator capable of producing objects that are 45.7cm tall and 30.5cm wide/long. Interestingly, all three new models -- there's also a simple, one-button version and a desktop prosumer version -- sport clear plastic sides. 3D printers are very susceptible to disruption from even slight breezes (the wind cools the plastic between the nozzle and the previous layer) but there's a completely batshit patent on the totally obvious "invention" of putting see-through sides on a 3D printer, so in general printers don't ship with sides, and manufacturers don't publicly advise their customers to add plastic sides to their machines.

Read the rest

3D-printable holiday fun-stuff in Thingiverse

Makerbot is celebrating Christmas with a set of printable Thingiverse objects of great delightfulness, including today's treat: a 3D printed snowball maker.

Countdown Read the rest

3D printed, trainable robot arm with Arduino controller

Joly sez, "Maker navic09 demos a prototype trainable robotic arm, made from 3d printed parts, an Arduino, and Adafruit analog feedback servos. Inspired by the Baxter robot, this arm can be trained to move with your own hands. Once the train button is pressed, you move the arm and gripper as needed while the Arduino stores the positions in EEPROM. After that the arm will replay the motion as needed."

The gripper and arm are on Thingiverse.

Trainable Robotic Arm 1 (Thanks, Joly!) Read the rest

3D printed ukulele!

Lung X Lung printed out a Makerlele form Thingiverse, and in this video, demonstrates the beauty of a 3D printed uke!

全台灣第一支 3d 列印烏克麗麗 3d printed ukulele (Thanks, David!) Read the rest

Household 3D printers pay for themselves in short order

Life-cycle economic analysis of distributed manufacturing with open-source 3-D printers (paywall link), a new paper published in Mechatronics, examines the cost of common household objects and calculates the projected return-on-investment for a household that buys a 3D printer and makes their own everyday objects, using open design files from sites like Thingiverse, rather than buying them in shops. The researchers concluded that a family could quickly -- in less than "a few years" -- recoup the cost of the printer if they printed their everyday objects. I suspect that the real value of 3D printers isn't simply replacing household objects, but rather, in ushering in new ways of relating to objects -- the same way that email and VoIP don't simple substitute for phone calls, but rather enable entirely different kinds of communications. Read the rest

3D printed book of textures and reliefs

Tom sez, "I have been thinking for some time how it would be nice to produce a 3D printed book of textures and reliefs. To publish and distribute all the wonderful architectural patterning and decoration we enjoy here in Chicago and beyond. This is the prototype for that idea. The subject matter for this book is derived from 3D scans made of sculptures and reliefs, found at The Art Institute of Chicago and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The scans were all produced using a regular DSLR camera and a software package called 123D Catch. By taking multiple digital photographs of a subject, the user is able to create a lifelike 3D scan of an object, person or architectural feature."

Tom's book is available as a free, downloadable shapefile on Thingiverse.

Orihon (Accordion Book) (Thanks, Tom) Read the rest

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