Holiday Makies: careers & outfits for the dolls you design!

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Boing Boing readers already know about MakieLab, the startup where my friends and I make 3D printed, customizable dolls called Makies.

What's inside a "Hello Barbie" surveillance toy?


Mattel's Hello Barbie has a microphone and a wifi interface, and it transmits the phrases it hears to a central server in order to parse them and formulate a response. Mattel claims that the data isn't being retained or harvested for marketing purposes, and assures parents that they can make Barbie stopping eavesdropping on them at will. But does it work? Read the rest

MAKE: custom action figure head paint job


Even when action-figure head sculpts are great, the paintjobs can be pretty indifferent, with eyelashes on foreheads. Ibentmyman-thing has, through trial-and-error, come up with a method for priming and painting heads, with gorgeous results. Read the rest

Army dudes in yoga poses: now an article of commerce

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Yoga Joes started life as a wonderful, weird Kickstarter to produce a set of nine "Green Army Men" in yoga poses; having raised over $100K in direct sales at $20/set ($10 for military personnel) Brogamats is now selling them in retail channels at a $28 premium, for all nine: "headstand, meditation pose, cobra pose, warrior one, warrior two, child's pose, tree pose, crow pose, and downward-facing dog." (via Canopy) Read the rest

Is this the most beautiful dragon penis yet?


In its luminous, rainbow-hued absurdity, the Nox is so delightful that it seems like a dog toy, perhaps, or a wedge of playdoh colors that one's child has only just rolled together.

But it is, in fact, an enormous silicone dragon penis! Read the rest

Mattel hired women to design these action figures for girls


The DC SuperHero Girls line is aimed at 6-year-olds and the look great. Mattel designer Christine Kim says the action figures are were designed by women for girls, not by men for boys. Read the rest

Playmobil pirate ship includes dark-skinned doll wearing "slave collar"


Ida Lockett of Sacramento, CA was helping her 5-year-old son put together a Playmobil pirate ship kit he'd been given for his birthday when she saw that the instructions told her to put a shackle around the neck of a dark-skinned figurine in torn clothing. Read the rest

Adorable toys for Nekoatsume, your favorite Japanese cat game


In the charming, compulsively playable Japanese iOS game Nekoatsume (aka Cat Collector), you spend a lot of time acquiring virtual toys to attract a coterie of virtual cats to your virtual backyard. But now it seems that there are actual Nekoastume toys for corporeal humans as well, and there's a way to buy them—even if you live outside of Japan.

Hubbyte Toys and Collectibles, a vendor based in the Philippines, posted on Facebook today that it is taking preorders for what appears to be a Nekoatsume playset, complete with a pop-up yard, cats (Manzoku-san, Hoiiro-san and Akage-san specifically), a blue food dish and yes, yes! A yellow ball.

The price is listed at what I believe is 1500 Philippine pesos, which is approximately $32 in U.S. dollars. You've spent so much time giving imaginary toys to imaginary cats. Why not give the gift of real toys based on imaginary cats to yourself? Read the rest

The Thingmaker was the coolest toy ever


One of my favorite toys as a kid was Creepy Crawlers. Introduced in 1964 by Mattel, it was a kit that let you make rubber insects, spiders, snakes, lizards etc. It came with a set of metal molds, squeeze bottles of liquid plastic called Plastigoop, and an electrically-powered, 390 degrees Fahrenheit open-face hot plate called the Thingmaker to cure the Plastigoop. It's the kind of toy that would be deemed to dangerous today because of the high heat and shocking hazard (the kit came with a mold cooling tray that you filled with water and placed next to the Thingmaker).

I may have gotten a couple of first-degree burns using Creepy Crawlers, but I never regretted it. It would occupy my friends and me for hours at a time. My kids would have loved the Thingmaker as much as I did.

The Fright Factory was an especially cool Thingmaker toy. It was a kit that let you make macabre prosthetics: scars, long fingernails, a third eye, a diseased tongue, fangs, etc.

Nightflight's Bryan Thomas has a good article about the history of the Thingmaker line of toys, with lots of images. And Bob Knetzger wrote a terrific article about Mattel's line of DIY Toys for MAKE.

Read the rest

Millennium Falcon quadcopter

Skinning drones with iconic spaceship shells is an absolute natural and I expect to see a lot more of it -- here's a salvo, Air Hogs's Millennium Falcon quadcopter, which hits stores on Sept 15 -- part of a family that includes landspeeders, TIE fighters, X-wings, and speeder bikes. Read the rest

Dissecting Sphero's Star Wars BB-8


Sphero's Star Wars BB-8 is sure to be the Cabbage Patch Kid of this Christmas, the ungettable gift that will spur mall fistfights, eBay price gouging, and plenty of crying kids (and adults). uBreakiFix cracked one open to see how it ticks. Read the rest

Hello Kitty museum exhibit headed to Seattle in November

The massive museum exhibition "Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty" will land at Seattle's EMP Museum in November. Read the rest

EverBlocks are the giant Lego bricks you always wanted


EverBlock's concept is simple: interlocking plastic bricks at a macro scale.

It's quick and easy to build nearly anything, by stacking and organizing the universal blocks in nearly any shape, pattern, or size. Anything you've constructed can be taken apart and re-assembled again, and the pieces can be re-used to build other objects, making EverBlock a unique green building method.

Wired's Liz Stinson: "with just three block versions, there are limitations to what you can build with the blocks. Don’t expect a life-size version of Lego’s architecture series just yet"

Read the rest

See Metallica guitarist's killer collection of classic monster memorabilia


If you are traveling through the San Francisco International Airport during the next four months, don't miss the exhibit Classic Monsters, featuring fantastic items from the collection of Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett, on view in the Terminal 2 gallery of the always-fascinating SFO Museum. The artifacts include vintage movie props, toys, and original paintings by Basil Gogos that appeared on covers Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine.

Above: Vampire Armand Tesla’s head before and after it melts in The Return of the Vampire starring Bela Lugosi, 1943.

Below: Frankenstein toys and memorabilia c. 1960s–70s; Wolf Man makeup test bust made for Bud Abbott and Lou Costello Meet Frankenstein starring Lon Chaney, Jr., 1948; Dracula toys and memorabilia c. 1960s–70s; Mummy painting c. 1969 Artist: Basil Gogos.

Classic Monsters: The Kirk Hammett Collection

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Airport security confiscates three year old's fart gun

The eagle-eyed aviation security humans at Dublin Airport prevented a desperate toddler from boarding a flight while in possession of a Despicable Me Fart Blaster: "We don’t make the rules but we apply the rules consistently." (via Lowering the Bar) Read the rest

A treadmill for Slinky toys, for your infinite Slinky-torturing pleasure


It's a powerful metaphor for something or other, from the good folks at, with build notes for your own Slinky-torturing pleasure. (via JWZ)

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Cecil the Lion to be immortalized as a Beanie Baby

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All profits go to the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit of University of Oxford in Oxford England.

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