Your favorite horror icons as evil vinyl figures

Twins_01-987x1024 Just in time for Halloween, check out these cool vinyl figures of some of the most iconic characters in the horror genre, courtesy of A Large Evil Corporation.

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Kickstarting Yogajoes: green army men in yoga poses


They're from the creator of "Brogamats," a line of yoga stuff for dudes, and intended to inspire veterans and people who like the military to try out a little yoga.

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Darth Vader plushies

Texas Roll Mafia makes these 9.5" tall Darth Vader plushies to order for $25, hand stitching them from felt and finishing them with acrylic and fabric paint. (via Geeky Merch)

Sacrelicious Barbie and Ken mods: Jesus, Mary, Kali


They're made by Argentinian artists Marianela Perelli and Pool Paolini, who've made 33 dolls representing figures from Islam, Judaism, Christianity and Hinduism that they're exhibiting next month in a Buenos Aires gallery show called "Barbie, The Plastic Religion."

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Video: violent family games of yore

In this episode of "They Actually Made That!?," our pal Attaboy demonstrates several strange and "violent" vintage family games.

Light Bulb Baking – The 50-year history of The Easy Bake Oven

The 1960s were a magical decade in the world of toys. Toy companies like Wham-O, Hasbro, Mattel and Kenner were churning out captivating toys faster than toy stores could keep them in stock. Toys like Lite-Brite, Etch A Sketch, Twister, Creepy Crawlers, Operation, Hippity Hop, Spirograph… and of course Kenner’s Easy Bake Oven (launched in 1963) were all the rage.

With an entertaining narrative, Light Bulb Baking explains how the miniature working oven got its start, dissects the oven, explains how a simple light bulb can bake a cake, and tells us loads of fun anecdotes and trivia about Easy Bake (such as the shelf life of Easy Bake mixes, the horrible burns caused by the 2006-2007 models, and the story of a 9-year-old Easy Bake Baker of the Year who won $5,000 for her Toffee Trifle Cake). The book, which is smartly designed with photos, diagrams and sidebars, ends with a bunch of award-winning recipes that make me want to dig out the old Easy Bake Oven I have somewhere in my garage.

Light Bulb Baking
by Todd Coopee
Sonderho Press
2013, 178 pages, 8.7 x 8.7 x 0.4 inches (paperback)

Take a look at other beautiful paper books at Wink. And sign up for the Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

Video: "Most Epic Nerf War in History!"

Australian filmmaker Danny Philippou brings a Nerf gun battle with your friends to a new cinematic level. (via Laughing Squid)

Replica Axe-Cop cosplay axe

$20, made from real plastic, and a fitting tribute to one of the most delightfully weird comics in the universe.

Nerf zombie-hunter machete


The $20 Zombie Striker Nerf Foam Machete is just what you need for your little monster-hunters.

How WARPO makes the most bitchingest toys of forever

This episode of Gweek is brought to you by Bombfell, the glorious clothing service for men that sends handpicked outfits to your door. Go to bombfell.com/gweek to get $10 off your first purchase. And by Stamps.com — get a $110 sign-up bonus with the offer code GWEEK!

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Lego: Batman's Tumbler

Legotumbb

The Lego Super Heroes model of Batman's Tumbler with Batman and Joker minifigs will be available September 1 for $200, or right now from scalpers for $850-$1150 (caveat emptor).

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Mouse Trap's cousin Crazy Clock

Mouse Trap (1963) became a classic but its cousin Crazy Clock (1964) vanished into history's toy chest. Above, vintage TV commercials for both (via Strange Universe).

Adult motorized Big Wheel

White Trike 640x480

If you miss your Big Wheel, you might dig this $2,000 motorized Big Wheel Drift Trike. Below, video of trike drifters (via Laughing Squid).

3D printed Barbie armor


$30 gets you printable STL files for three suits of Barbie armor -- you'll need your own printer (or use one at your local makerspace).

History of the Slip 'N Slide

My wife (and kids) are big fans of the classic Slip 'N Slide on a summer day. The New York Times Magazine has the history of its invention which involved belly-flopping on a concrete driveway.

Like any concerned father with ready access to rugged, waterproof synthetic fabrics at work, Robert Carrier took home a 50-foot roll of beige Naugahyde in hopes of persuading his son to splash down on something safer. He unfurled it in the yard, hosed it down and watched as every kid in the neighborhood showed up and stayed to slide for hours.

Realizing he had a hit on his hands, Carrier used his sewing skills to refine his product. “He stitched a long tube along one side, sewn shut at one end, with spaces between the stitching so that when you attached the hose, the water pressure would build up and water would squirt out those openings and lubricate the surface of the material,” (explains Tim Walsh, author of "Timeless Toys: Classic Toys and the Playmakers Who Created Them.")

(Thanks, Tanya Schevitz!)