Turkey: 6,000 arrested following coup, but that doesn't make it an inside job

Erdogan_gesturing_Rabia (1)

The failed military coup in Turkey was bizarre, even (especially) by the standards of Turkish military coups (which is a surprisingly large data-set), and in the wake of the coup, 6,000 people were promptly rounded up and arrested including respected judges, powerful military leaders, prosecutors, and a whole list of others whose names seem to have been put on an enemies list long before any coup. Read the rest

Sandy Hook Truthers are the worst


Lenny Pozner's young son died in the Sandy Hook mass killing. Conspiracy theorists believe the killing was staged. Pozner's efforts to educate them, to prove that his son died, only resulted in relentless trolling and harassment. Yet he keeps trying: “I’m going to have to protect Noah’s honor for the rest of my life,” he says.

To further his cause, Pozner has created an organization, called the HONR Network, whose goal is to “bring awareness to Hoaxer activity” and “prosecute those who wittingly and publicly defame, harass, and emotionally abuse the victims of high profile tragedies.” Since there is no criminal law that protects families like Pozner’s from the darker impulses of the Internet, he and his volunteers — folks he met virtually, when he began debunking — perform a slow and painful task. Whenever a video or a screed appears online attacking the victims of a horrible event, they alert venues like YouTube that their rules have been broken. The victories have been small. Though they’ve removed hundreds of links from the Internet, there are countless more like them.

“I know that the more garbage that is out there, the more it ages over time, the more the myth becomes accepted as a disgusting historical fact that tries to dismiss the existence of my child,” says Pozner. “I mean, damn it, his life had value. He existed. He was real. How dare they.”

Pozner occupies a place I know many are becoming familiar with: hoping that conspiracy theorists and other obsessives are arguing in good faith, but knowing, deep down, that it's not the case. Read the rest

9/11 Truthers still not done


If lacking the attention they got in times past, those who believe in conspiracy theories concerning the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks are still going.

The common thread between these three believers, and others I spoke with, is the sense of isolation from regular social scenes and the reinforcement from the tightly knit 9/11 Truth community.

“It’s brutal. I will never volunteer to talk about it,” Mcllvaine said. “In my circles, people ignore it. It’s like I’m a leper. I don’t see many people anymore.” He says his wife supports him, but doesn’t want to talk about how Bobby died. She says it doesn’t matter, if even his theories are true, because it won’t bring her son back. “If she started talking about that she wouldn’t have any friends.” …

But within the movement, they have a safe space.

It's an ad-hoc mutual support group, in other words.

You know who likes Truthers? I would say to keep your eye on Donald Trump, but I figure you're pretty sick of looking at him. Read the rest

Death Star was an inside job: a Loose Change parody

Brilliant, and well made parody of the 9/11 video 'Loose Change.' It points out all the 'coincidences' in the destruction of the Death Star. Was it an inside job?

Delacroix painting defaced with Truther slogan

Police questioned a 28-year-old woman who allegedly scribbled "AE911" with a sharpie on Eugene Delacroix's Liberty. [Reuters] Read the rest

Internet crackpots believe Newtown massacre was staged, citing "absolute" Photoshop proof

"Yes, there really are Newtown truthers," writes Alex Seitz-Wald in Salon. And they can tell by the pixels.