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Case and Molly: a VR helmet game based on Neuromancer

Case and Molly is a prototype game for the Oculus Rift based on William Gibson's classic 1984 science fiction novel Neuromancer, by Greg Borenstein. It alternates between two points of view: an action hero (Molly) who is trying to physically penetrate a target, and a network operator (Case) who supports her by hacking the systems that protect that space. As Borenstein writes, this is "all too familiar."

He continues, "We constantly navigate the tension between the physical and the digital in a state of continuous partial attention. We try to walk down the street while sending text messages or looking up GPS directions. We mix focused work with a stream of instant message and social media conversations. We dive into the sudden and remote intimacy of seeing a family member’s face appear on FaceTime or Google Hangout."

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Art inspired by "Wired Love"


Silvia Ruzanka saw yesterday's post about the 1880 novel "Wired Love," about a romance carried on by telegraph; she writes:

I've been fascinated by this book for years, and have been using it as an entryway into art and research about the telegraph as the first cyberspace.

"Dots and Dashes" is a VR art piece inspired by the novel. It was made for the CAVE, and we've also exhibited it using a head-mount display setup, and is an attempt to imagine the sense of space created by the telegraph overlaid on the space of VR.

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Oculus Rift VR headset convincing enough for one 90-year-old

"Oh, man! It's so real!"

Creators remember Knightmare, the pioneering VR adventure show

Knightmare was a fantastic childrens' adventure show that ran on British TV in the 1980s. A youngster, wearing a vision-blinding helmet, would be guided around a giant virtual reality castle by a team of his or her peers, which issued instructions from dungeon master Treguard's chambers. Though defined by its technical limitations, Knightmare built a cult following thanks to its pioneering blue-screen setup—hence the blindfolding—and merciless treatment of contestants. The Guardian's Ben Child interviewed creator Tim Child and star Hugo Myatt and found that the production was itself something of a bad dream. Embedded above is the show's intro and a short documentary about it. Then you may enjoy a a selection of deaths.

Mote and Beam

Joel Johnson, formerly the gadgets man at this august institution, has himself a new blog: Mote and Beam. This one, unlike the others, is about whatever the hell he likes! Right now, this is Virtual Reality. Early highlights:

Six possibly useful observations about the successful Oculus Rift Kickstarter
Grove iPhone 5 case: When a better product makes one nostalgic for an older product more given to decay
Why I think the most compelling piece of VR software might be Writeroom.

Gamers are going to push VR forward in the near term. (And projects like the Oculus Rift are certainly game-centric, by dint of the first software available alone.) But one of the most compelling things about VR for me–the thing I think will take VR from a niche within video gaming and into a, well, larger niche within computing at large–is the notion of using VR headsets for productivity.

T(ether) turns iPad into VR interface

T(ether) from Matthew Blackshaw on Vimeo.

T(ether) is a display that sees you. With motion capture cameras embedded in a special glove and headset, it tracks the user's movements and allows them to manipulate objects on-screen using gestures and movements. From Creative Applications:

The motion capture system consists of 19 cameras mounted on a frame, covering a tracked space of 14 by 12 by 9 feet, where the tracking of retro-reflective tags occurs. The cameras are connected to a server, which processes the marker data from each camera reconstructing spatial position and orientation. Apple’s iPad 2 tablets are used as a window to the virtual world.

Mr. Halliday better hurry up if he wants his haptic gear to be competitive.

Tether Cinder [Creative Applications]

Sony's HMZ-T1: Home theater in a headset

Sony's HMZ-T1 is a head-mounted 3D headset, to be released later this year in Japan. Two 1280x720 OLED displays, each just 7/10 of an inch across, create a virtual 750" screen. Perceived 20m from the viewer, it "corresponds to the sense of cinema as seen from a large central seat." It'll be 60,000 Yen ($785) from mid-november.

Source [Impress.co.jp]