Ifixit is the new Justice League of America and Kyle Wiens is its Superman


Motherboard's Jason Koebler follows Kyle Wiens around the Electronics Reuse Conference -- Burning Man for the service-people who fix your phones, laptops, and other devices -- in New Orleans. Wiens is founder and CEO of Ifixit, whose mission is to tear down every single thing you own, write a repair manual for it, and source or manufacture the parts you need to fix it yourself. Read the rest

Caterpillar's heavy vehicles are killswitched subprime computers on wheels


In an earnings call in which Caterpillar execs explained their dismal takings to investors, Cat execs explained their plan to grow by leasing tractors to Chinese companies with crummy track-records for payment. Read the rest

Startup uses ultrasound chirps to covertly link and track all your devices

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Silverpush, a startup that's just received $1.25M in venture capital, uses ultrasonic chirps that are emitted by apps, websites, and TV commercials to combine the identities associated with different devices (tablets, phones, computers, etc), so that your activity on all of them can be aggregated and sold to marketers. Read the rest

EPA finds more toxic VW emissions fraud in Audis and Porsches


The EPA, the California Air Resources Board and Environment Canada have detected more fraudulent firmware in VW products; this time in 2014-2016 cars from the super-profitable Audii and Porsche lines. Read the rest

EPA finds more Dieselgate emissions fraud in VW's Audis and Porsches

The EPA, the California Air Resources Board and Environment Canada have detected more fraudulent firmware in VW products; this time in 2014-2016 cars from the super-profitable Audii and Porsche lines. Read the rest

Librarian of Congress grants limited DRM-breaking rights for cars, games, phones, tablets, and remixers

Every three years, the Librarian of Congress allows the public to request exemptions to a law that makes it a felony to break a digital lock, even on on a device that you own, and which you are breaking for a lawful purpose. For the past year, public interest groups have been spending their scarce money and resources writing petitions to the Copyright Office, arguing that people who own devices with computers in them should have the same property rights as they do in their non-computerized devices: the right to open, change, and improve the things they own in lawful ways.

Near-future Ikea catalog: the Internet of Things' flat-pack as a service


Julian Bleecker and his Near Future Laboratory have followed up on their amazing Skymall-of-the-future catalog with an imaginary near-future Ikea catalog that jam an insane amount of witty futuristic speculation into elegantly presented, arresting images.

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Putting your kettle on the Internet of Things makes your wifi passwords an open secret


The $150 Smarter Ikettle lets you start your water boiling from anywhere in the world over the Internet -- and it also contains long-term serious security vulnerabilities that allow attackers to extract your wifi passwords from it. Read the rest

SRSLY, they want to put DRM in JPEGs


The Joint Photographic Expert Group, which oversees the JPEG format, met in Brussels today to discuss adding DRM to its format, so that there would be images that would be able to force your computer to stop you from uploading pictures to Pintrest or social media. Read the rest

Algorithmic guilt: defendants must be able to inspect source code in forensic devices


Some day, you may be the defendant in a criminal trial that turns on whether the software in a forensic device reached a reliable conclusion about a DNA test or other piece of evidence. Wouldn't you like to have your own experts check the source code on that device? Read the rest

Internet of Things That Lie: the future of regulation is demonology


Volkswagen's cars didn't have a fault in their diesel motors -- they were designed to lie to regulators, and that matters, because regulation is based on the idea that people lie, but things tell the truth. Read the rest

VW con produced as much extra air pollution as all UK power generation, industry, ag & vehicles


Volkswagen's intentional fraud resulted in an extra 1,000,000 metric tons of air pollution being spewed into the skies over America; if they'd extended the con to Europe (where there are far more diesels), it would have been orders of magnitude worse. Read the rest

David Cameron now all alone in demanding crypto backdoors, doubles down on antibiotic resistant superterrorists


The US government has given up on demanding backdoors in cryptography for now (advocates have announced that they'll wait until a terrorist attack and then use that as the excuse for fresh demands), leaving the UK government as the last man standing in the race to compromise the security of the technologies with the power of life and death over us. Read the rest

Empty Epson "professional" inkjet cartridges are still 20% full

If you've wondered why it matters that the Internet of Things is being born with the inkjet printer business model, here's why. Read the rest

Dear Internet of Things: human beings are not things

My new Locus column is What If People Were Sensors, Not Things to be Sensed? Read the rest

Your baby monitor is an Internet-connected spycam vulnerable to voyeurs and crooks

Researchers revealed ten major vulnerabilities in Internet-of-Things babycams from a variety of vendors ranging from spunky startups like Ibaby Labs to rock-ribbed (and deep-pocketed -- attention, class actioneers!) giants like Philips. Read the rest

Samsung fridges can leak your Gmail logins

Researchers at Pen Test Partners took up the challenge to hack a smart fridge at Defcon's IoT Village, and discovered that they could man-in-the-middle your Google login credentials from Samsung fridges. Read the rest

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