I'm profiled in the Globe and Mail Report on Business magazine

Screen Shot 2016-05-17 at 4.54.24 PM.png

The monthly Report on Business magazine in the Canadian national paper The Globe and Mail profiled my work on DRM reform, as well as my science fiction writing and my work on Boing Boing. Read the rest

How to protect the future web from its founders' own frailty

OrfnjkI
Earlier this month, I gave the afternoon keynote at the Internet Archive's Decentralized Web Summit, and my talk was about how the people who founded the web with the idea of having an open, decentralized system ended up building a system that is increasingly monopolized by a few companies -- and how we can prevent the same things from happening next time.

Oculus quietly drops DRM from its VR systems

ACWO_Ludovico

In May, Facebook division Oculus broke its longstanding promise not to use DRM to limit its customers' choices, deploying a system that prevented Oculus customers from porting the software they'd purchased to run on non-Oculus hardware. Read the rest

Google's version of the W3C's video DRM has been cracked

animation

Since 2013, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has been working with the major browser companies, Netflix, the MPAA, and a few other stakeholders to standardize "Encrypted Media Extensions" (EME), which attempts to control web users' behavior by adding code to browsers that refuses to obey user instructions where they conflict with the instructions sent by video services. Read the rest

Phones without headphone jacks are phones with DRM for audio

Headphone_jack_3.5mm (1)

Nilay Patel's magnificent rant about Apple's rumored announcement that future phones won't have headphone jacks starts with the main event: "1. Digital audio means DRM audio." Read the rest

Intel x86s hide another CPU that can take over your machine (you can't audit it)

PIC12C508-HD
Recent Intel x86 processors implement a secret, powerful control mechanism that runs on a separate chip that no one is allowed to audit or examine. When these are eventually compromised, they'll expose all affected systems to nearly unkillable, undetectable rootkit attacks. I've made it my mission to open up this system and make free, open replacements, before it's too late.

Deep learning AI "autoencodes" Blade Runner, recreates it so faithfully it gets a takedown notice

1-LNPjTuTmTW3Wzeg-3RzlZg

Artist and researcher Terence Broad is working on his master's at Goldsmith's computing department; his dissertation involved training neural networks to "autoencode" movies they've been fed. Read the rest

How security and privacy pros can help save the web from legal threats over vulnerability disclosure

drm-og-1

I have a new op-ed in today's Privacy Tech, the in-house organ of the International Association of Privacy Professionals, about the risks to security and privacy from the World Wide Web Consortium's DRM project, and how privacy and security pros can help protect people who discover vulnerabilities in browsers from legal aggression. Read the rest

Mitsubishi's dieselgate: cheating since 1991

Mitsubishi_eK_Wagon_rear

Mitsubishi has admitted that it cheated on emissions standards tests for a quarter of a century, and it admits that this affected 600,000 cars, but the company says that the cheating cars were only sold to Japanese people. Read the rest

Hungarian ruling party wants to ban all working crypto

Dia03 (1)

The parliamentary vice-president from Fidesz -- the largest faction in the Hungarian government -- has asked parliament to "ban communication devices that [law enforcement agencies] are not able to surveil despite having the legal authority to do so." Read the rest

UK minister compares adblocking to piracy, promises action

maxresdefault

UK culture secretary John Whittingdale gave a speech at the Oxford Media Convention where he compared adblocking to piracy and vowed "to set up a round table involving major publishers, social media groups and adblocking companies in the coming weeks to do something about the problem." Read the rest

The Eleventh HOPE: NYC, Jul 22-24 (I'm keynoting!)

cropped-hope_black

After literally decades of trying to make it to one of 2600 Magazine's legendary HOPE (Hackers on Planet Earth) events, held every two years in NYC, I will be coming to town this year for it -- and giving one of the keynotes. Read the rest

3D Systems abandons its Cube printers, but DRM means you can't buy filament from anyone else

tumblr_inline_o0rdvevaAT1rl4bdh_500

3D printing giant 3D Systems has experienced a terrible year and a change in leadership, and seems to be backing away from consumer products, meaning that it's orphaned its Cube home 3D printers. Read the rest

Juniper blinks: firewall will nuke the NSA's favorite random number generator

image02

In the month since network security giant Juniper Networks was forced to admit that its products had NSA-linked backdoors, the company's tried a lot of different strategies: minimizing assurances, apologies, firmware updates -- everything, that is, except for removing th Dual_EC random number generator that is widely understood to have been compromised by the NSA. Read the rest

Resilience over rigidity: how to solve tomorrow's computer problems today

160091

My new Locus Magazine column, Wicked Problems: Resilience Through Sensing, proposes a solution the urgent problem we have today of people doing bad stuff with computers. Where once "bad stuff with computers" meant "hacking your server," now it could potentially mean "blocking air-traffic control transmissions" or "programming your self-driving car to kill you." Read the rest

Breaking the DRM on the 1982 Apple ][+ port of Burger Time

056c026d-1c66-4d42-9fae-a8e96df290c5-1020x914

4AM is a prolific computer historian whose practice involves cracking the copy protection on neglected Apple ][+ floppy disks, producing not just games, but voluminous logs that reveal the secret history of the cat-and-mouse between crackers and publishers. Read the rest

If you think self-driving cars have a Trolley Problem, you're asking the wrong questions

train

In my latest Guardian column, The problem with self-driving cars: who controls the code?, I take issue with the "Trolley Problem" as applied to autonomous vehicles, which asks, if your car has to choose between a maneuver that kills you and one that kills other people, which one should it be programmed to do? Read the rest

More posts