Militarized police action on the Dakota Access Pipeline


Seems unarmed, peaceful protestors were tear gassed, threatened at gun point, and arrested today. Here is another video of the same event.

I don't know anything about the source of these videos. Perhaps we'll get some info in the comments. Read the rest

LA water hog exposed as "Wet Prince of Bel-Air"


Who is the top residential water hog of Los Angeles? The Center for Investigative Reporting has narrowed it down to 7 Bel-Air mansions, with billionaire Jerry Perenchio's estate the prime suspect for using almost 12 million gallons of water a year. Read the rest

This couple's business uses more water than all homes in Los Angeles combined


Mother Jones profiles Lynda and Stewart Resnick, central California megafarmers who grow water-intensive tree nuts, mostly almonds and pistachios. During a 1980s drought, they bought distressed groves, now part of a farming conglomerate grossing $4.8 billion annually, according to the article. Read the rest

This woman is allergic to water


Rachel Warwick suffers from aquagenic urticaria, an immune reaction to contact with water. According to the BBC, it "is like being stung by a bush of particularly pernicious nettles, combined with the malaise of hay fever, every single day." From the BBC:

It’s a world where relaxing baths are the stuff of nightmares and snorkelling in tropical seas is as appealing as rubbing yourself with bleach. “Those things are my idea of hell,” she says.

Any contact with water whatsoever – even her own sweat – leaves Rachel with a painful, swollen and intensely itchy rash which can last for several hours. “The reaction makes me feel as if I’ve run a marathon. I feel really tired afterwards so I have to go and sit down for quite a while,” she says. “It’s horrible, but if I cry my face swells up”...

Right from the beginning, aquagenic urticaria was as baffling to scientists as it is to the rest of us. Technically, the condition isn’t actually an allergy at all, since it’s likely caused by an immune reaction to something within the body, rather than an over-reaction to something foreign, such as pollen or peanuts. The earliest theory to explain how it works is that water is interacting with the outermost layer of skin, which consists mostly of dead skin cells, or the oily substance which keeps skin moist. Contact with water may cause these components to release toxic compounds, which in turn leads to an immune reaction.

Others have suggested that water may simply dissolve chemicals in the layer of dead skin, allowing them to penetrate deeper where they can cause an immune reaction.

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Dog unnervingly still as others frolic amid pool chaos


Come on. Throw her a ball. [Video Link]


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Horse (car) unable to "Charge!" (drive) through deeply-flooded road


A gentleman in England spots, adroitly, that the road ahead is underwater. So he decides, not so adroitly, to "Charge!" The story unfolds from this point as you expect it will. Read the rest

How an engineer/public health whistleblower led the citizen scientists who busted Flint's water crisis


When Marc Edwards was a young Virginia tech engineer, he landed a job with Cadmus Group, an EPA subcontractor who'd been hired to investigate problems with the DC water-supply, but when he discovered a lead contamination crisis and refused to stop talking about it, he was fired. Read the rest

How to cook up some delicious deep fried water


From Jonathan Marcus's YouTube:

water... frozen reverse spherification (calcium alginate membrane)... flour... egg... panko... 375ºF peanut oil

A dozen of these were prepared for and given away at the Stupid Shit No One Needs and Terrible Ideas Hackathon 2.0 ...

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"Water Bar" celebrates the wonder and fragility of tap water


Arts group Works Progress Studio have opened Water Bar, which bills itself as the first-ever bar devoted to nothing but public sources of water. Read the rest

After appointed city manager illegally jacked up prices, Flint paid the highest water rates in America


The tainted water that poisoned an entire generation of children in Flint, MI, was the most expensive water in America. Read the rest

Ten hard truths about the Flint water atrocity


Years before the complaints from Flint's citizenry about their water provoked action from the state, Governor Rick Snyder spent $440,000 to supply better water to the GM factory, where the new water supply was corroding the car parts on the assembly line. Read the rest

Red-baiting water speculator plans to drain the Mojave of its ancient water


Scott Slater, a former water lawyer, is the CEO of Cadiz, Inc, a hedge-fund-backed company that's purchased the water rights for 45,000 acres of the Mojave on Route 66, 75 miles northeast of Palm Springs. He wants to pump 814 million gallons of ancient water out of the desert and send it to drought-stricken southern California, where he can soak the thirsty millions for $2.4 billion. Read the rest

Giant inflatable duck hates drinking water in Japan


In this Japanese TV commercial we learn that anyone who tries to prevent college students from enjoying any beverage other than water will face the wrath of a giant inflatable duck.

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EPA committed 'covert propaganda' social media campaign on American public, auditors find

Spill of toxic wastewater from a mine in Colorado, August 10, 2015. (Reuters)

Congressional auditors say The Environmental Protection Agency engaged in “covert propaganda,” a violation of federal law, when it launched a massive social media campaign urging Americans to support the Waters of the United States rule.

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A better solution for astronauts who drink their own piss


Aquaporin A/S made this new small and lightweight filter that uses aquaporins, membrane proteins, to turn urine, sweat, and wastewater into drinkable water. Read the rest

Meet Martin Riese, water sommelier


"The most interesting part for me about water is it all looks the same... but still there's a huge taste profile to it." Read the rest

80 million plastic balls to prevent Los Angeles reservoirs from becoming carcinogenic


The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power is buying 80 million 4-inch black polyethylene balls to cover the surfaces of three Los Angeles reservoirs that serve 4 million residents. At a cost of 33 cents each, the hollow spheres are designed to block sunlight from turning bromide and chlorine in the water into bromate, a suspected carcinogen.

Photos of the ball manufacturing equipment at XavierC in Glendora, California.

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