A cloud shaped like Britain

This image, taken by Matt Hallas in the East Midlands, was sent into the BBC's splendid Weather Watchers page, which has many more atmospheric delights. Read the rest

Man struck by lightning while sitting at his office desk

On Monday, Nick Gemayel was seated at his office desk in his Rochester, New York auto repair shop when he saw a bright flash spark from a light switch and heard a loud crack. Then he realized that his hand hurt like hell was blistered. A co-worker reported that he had seen lightning strike the building. It apparently arced from the light switch into Gemayel. Hospital doctors treated and released him. No word yet on what superpowers he may now have.

(Associated Press) Read the rest

These 'temperature blankets' show a whole year's worth of weather!

All you knitters or crocheters, this one's for you: temperature blankets

The basic idea is that, every single day for an entire year, you'll stitch up a new row (or square or circle or other shape). The color you choose is determined by the outside temperature. 

When I first came across one on Instagram, I thought it was something pregnant women did to kill time while waiting for baby to arrive. I thought these soon-to-be-moms were measuring their internal body temperature not the one outside. I can see now that I made it too complicated, and weird. To be fair, the crocheter of the one I saw had described it as her "daughter's temperature blanket."

Anyway, it's a super cool and simple idea. And it leaves plenty of room for creativity.

Most people start them at the beginning of the year, but you seem like a rebel to me. Start one today. Read the rest

Dozens of prairie storms unfold in this stunning 4K timelapse

Chad Cowan shared this taste of his upcoming long-form timelapse of massive thunderstorms sweeping across the American plains.

He gives a little background on how he was inspired by Tom Lowe:

This collection of timelapses was gathered over the last six years. The project started out as wanting to be able to see the life-cycles of these storms, just for my own enjoyment and to increase my understanding of them. Over time, it morphed into an obsession with wanting to document as many photogenic supercells as I could, in as high a resolution as possible, as to be able to share with those who couldn't see first hand the majestic beauty that comes alive in the skies above America's Great Plains every Spring. After more than 100,000 miles on the road and tens of thousands of shutter clicks later, this is the result. I hope you enjoy watching it as much as I enjoyed creating it. Keep an eye out for a long form version of my storm timelapses, as these are a small sample of what I've been able to gather. I'm not sure yet how the extended version will be released.

FRACTAL - 4k StormLapse (Vimeo / Chad Cowan) Read the rest

Alessandro Puccinelli's 'Intersections,' where violent seas and skies collide

Photographer Alessandro Puccinelli is mesmerized by powerful waves. His photo series Intersections captures the fleeting moment when the ocean and the clouds appear to become one. Read the rest

This pilot takes astonishing aerial nighttime storm photographs

Ecuadorean pilot Santiago Borja Lopez makes the most of his downtime at work, taking stunning photos of dramatic storms, often lit by the moon. Read the rest

Spectacular timelapse of clouds filling the entire Grand Canyon

The latest stunning video from artistic collaborators in the dark sky movement is Kaibab Elegy by Harun Mehmedinovic, shot at the Grand Canyon. At about a minute in, there's a rare and hypnotic full cloud inversion worth the wait. Read the rest

Melting dumpster lid looks like a Dali painting

It is always summer in Phoenix. [via] Read the rest

Animation of today's storms flaring on US radar loop

http://media.boingboing.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/04TlXflrFWK_42Zg.mp4 A time-lapse radar loop from Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch shows today's storms billowing like a fire dancing over gasoline. The image (and the storms) cover the U.S. from West Texas to Pennsylvania. [via] Read the rest

Enormous iceberg off coast is Newfoundland village's latest and somewhat temporary tourist attraction

Tourists are flocking to Ferryland, Newfoundland, reports Aric Jenkins, and it's all because of a huge chunk of ice.

Ferryland, a tiny Newfoundland town of roughly 500 people, got a holiday surprise over Easter weekend when a massive block of ice appeared off-shore — overshadowing people, boats and even houses on land. The iceberg seems to have parked in the waters outside the town and, according to CTV News, visitors have started flocking to the area to witness the colossal floating chunk of ice and post photos on social media.

Ferryland is apparently a good spot for iceberg spotting, but the unusual number and size of the bergs this year are due to "unusually strong counter-clockwise winds." Photo: Reuters. Read the rest

Yes, flights are getting more turbulent thanks to climate change

Advances in Atmospheric Sciences reports that flying is going to get more and more turbulent, even at cruising altitudes, because of climate change:

Read the rest

Wind so intense that these cyclists can't pedal into it

Strong winds in Cape Town, South Africa disrupted the recent Cape Town Cycle Tour. If the cyclists had just turned around, the following would be their theme song:

Read the rest

How to clear a road buried 60 feet in snow

Japan's Mt. Tateyama in the Hida Mountains is considered one of the snowiest spots on the planet. More than 125 feet of snow can fall on the region in a single year. Route 6 runs right through the Mt. Tateyama but just before you enter the tunnel, there's a 1/4 mile piece of highway called yuki-no-otani, or in English, Snow Canyon. The Toyama Prefectural Road Public Corporation is responsible for plowing the road after winter. It takes about a month. From Atlas Obscura:

At the Snow Canyon, the non-human star of the show is the HTR608, a rotary snow blower made by the Nichijo company—the 608 refers to the 608-horsepower engine. The HTR608 can plow through snow up to six feet high. The rotating bar helps pull snow into the machine, and a powerful propeller ejects it out of an aerodynamic pipe that can spray the snow nearly 50 feet high and half a football field to the side. But before this monster can even begin its job on the Snow Canyon, a series of prior snow-clearing events must take place.

Mt. Tateyama receives too much snow and is too remote to receive continual snow plow treatment, thus for much of the winter snow is allowed to bury the pass. Sometime in early March, a bulldozer specially equipped with both a GPS and a mobile satellite phone is sent up the mountain and over the Snow Canyon. The GPS and sat phone work in tandem to provide the driver a detailed video screen image of the dozer’s location in relation to the center of the snow-buried highway.

Read the rest

Daydream 4K: a breathtaking journey through the American Southwest

Videographer Ron Risman, who we've featured on Boing Boing many times, specializes in nature and night sky time lapse video (and also conducts workshops). This time, Ron made a gorgeous video of the Southwestern US.

As I nod off at my desk I begin to day dream about the breathtaking beauty of the American Southwest. Suddenly I am whisked away to this enchanting land of red rock hoodoos and truly grand canyons as far as the eye can see. Much of this magnificent area has an elevation of 8000-10,000 ft above sea level and with no city in sight for hours - the skies are so dark that viewing our galaxy is as easy as opening our eyes and looking up.

This film was captured while in Southern Utah and Northern Arizona this past September and early October. I was leading two advanced timelapse workshops (TimelapseWorkshops.com), and spent another few days ahead of time scouting locations with my guest instructor, Sean Parker.

In total we drove over 30 hours to get to all of these locations - yet each minute was filled with anticipation of what mother nature would bring.

Anyone who has met me knows my love for the southwest. I have been photographing this area for the past 20 years and since launching my timelapse workshops in 2013 I continue to attract amateur and professional photographers from all over the world (including Brazil, Turkey, China, Denmark, Scotland, and the United States) who fly in to learn how to capture and create breathtaking time lapses using their DSLR's.

Read the rest

Why just four seasons? Ancient Japan had 72 microseasons

Spring. Summer. Fall. Winter. Boring. Ancient Japan had 72 microseasons each lasting about five days. They each have wonderfully evocative names like "Spring Winds Thaw the Ice" and "The Maple and Ivy Turn Yellow." We just finished “The Bear Retreats to its Den,” and this microseason 64, falling immediately after the solstice, is called "The Common Heal-All Sprouts. Read the rest

Mysterious trumpets of the apocalypse heard in Spokane, Washington

Numerous residents of a Spokane, Washington suburb reported hearing unsettling trumpet sounds overnight on December 14. Listen to a recording of the noise below. Non-believers suggest that it may have been the sound of many snowplows scraping the concrete roads or train rails creaking in the cold. One news outlet's "science expert" commented that "temperature does affect the speed of sound, which can make certain things sounds different than what we are used to hearing."

Of course, we all know the truth: It is the seven trumpets as described in the Book of Revelation. The apocalypse is nigh, and it's starting in Spokane.

"Strange sound in Spokane Valley has thousands of people talking" (KHQ via Mysterious Universe) Read the rest

A message to Breitbart from Weather.com

"Note to Breitbart: Earth is not cooling, climate change is real and please stop using our video to mislead Americans." Read the rest

More posts