The return to a simpler, uglier web

brutalist websites

Pascal Deville loves "beautiful atrocities"—websites that could be described as intentionally brutalist were they not mostly just ugh. Fast Company interviewed him on his love of rough design, strangely compelling as it is in the age of bloated, broken, but very pretty websites.

"I wouldn't call it a protest but a shout-out for more humanity in today's web design," Deville says. He views his site as a bastion for a segment of Internet culture of people who built scrappy websites themselves as opposed to using services with pre-canned templates like Squarespace. "Terms like UX and user friendly don't have a lot of soul or guts and treat everything like a product. They also killed a lot of the web culture, which seems to find a voice on Brutalistwebsites.com."

More from The Washington Post.

Intriguingly, Deville has found in his Q&As with coders and designers that few set out to mimic this newly popular aesthetic; instead, they all arrived at the same point out of a drive to create something original.

“[Brutalism] is interesting to me … because it doesn’t necessarily have a defined set of aesthetic signifiers,” said Jake Tobin, the designer behind trulybald.com. “What defines those signifiers is decided by the platform it’s built on.”

Previously. Read the rest

Rube Goldberg machine built entirely from HTML form elements

rube

Sebastian Ly Serena's website consists solely of a bizarre HTML contraption that animates form elements until all of them have expanded and the author's email address is exposed. It's built entirely from standard web forms and javascript, ugly as sin, and completely wonderful. [via Hacker News, whose commenters are unimpressed because the underlying code doesn't really model a chain reaction.] Read the rest

PowerPuff avatar creator

animated

There is, finally, a Read the rest

Pixel art, but with triangles instead of squares

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Triangulart is "a silly graphic editor build in JavaScript to create isometric illustrations" Read the rest

Microsoft's 1994 home page

Microsoft has recreated its first home page, from 1994. From Microsoft's The Fire Hose blog:

In 1994, among the reasons Microsoft started a website was to put its growing Knowledge Base online. At the time, the company managed support forums for customers on CompuServe, one of the earliest major Internet dial-up service providers.

“We had started to build up a community there; people would answer questions for each other,” recalls Mark Ingalls, a Microsoft engineer in 1994 who would become Microsoft.com’s first administrator. He was also the only website employee at that time, other than his boss. But the staff doubled early on, when Steve Heaney was hired to offer vacation relief, Ingalls says.

In terms of “Web design,” the notion, much less the phrase, didn’t really exist.

“There wasn’t much for authoring tools,” Ingalls says. “There was this thing called HTML that almost nobody knew.” Information that was submitted for the new Microsoft.com website often came to Ingalls via 3-1/2-inch floppy disks.

“Steve Heaney and I put together PERL scripts that handled a lot of these daily publishing duties for us,” he says. “For a while, we ran the site like a newspaper, where we published content twice a day. And if you missed the cutoff for the publishing deadline, you didn’t get it published until the next running of the presses, or however you want to term it.”

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Winners of the Webby Awards 2014!

Our friends at The Webby Awards have announced this year's recipients! As they do every year, The Webby Awards 2014 celebrates well-known big sites and also fantastic indie operations I've never heard of before but look terrific. And special congratulations to BB pal Lawrence Lessig who received a "Webby Lifetime Achievement" award! In my favorite category, "Weird," the Webby went to The .GIFYs. Read the rest

You Are Not So Smart podcast 013: Clive Thompson and How Technology Affects Our Minds

YANSS: RSS | iTunes |

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Live-stream two days of public lectures on physics and cosmology

The Nobel Conference is an annual event at Minnesota's Gustavus Adolphus College that brings in scientists from around the world to talk to the general public about a given theme. This year, the conference is focusing on physics and cosmology, from tiny particles to massive features of the Universe outside our own solar system. The conference runs all day tomorrow and Wednesday and you can watch the whole thing on a live stream. Lawrence Krauss will be speaking Wednesday at 1:00 central. Read the rest

The world's first website

Back up at its original URL courtesy of CERN: "Twenty years of a free, open web." Read the rest

Abandoned websites

Vestigial corporate barnacles too insignificant to warrant the effort of deletion, these immortal websites offer nostalgia and not a little humor. [Wired] Read the rest

Tim Berners-Lee: The Web needs to stay open, but DRM is fine by me

AUSTIN—The knight who invented the World Wide Web came to SXSW to point out a few ways in which we're still doing it wrong.

Tim Berners-Lee's "Open Web Platform: Hopes & Fears" keynote hopscotched from the past of the Web to its present and future, with some of the same hectic confusion that his invention shows in practice. (The thought that probably went through attendees' heads: "Sir Tim is nervous at public speaking. Just like us!")

But his conclusion was clear enough: The Web is our work, and we shouldn't put our tools down. Read the rest

YouTube briefly added to new Russian web blacklist

Not long after Russia's new kiddie porn internet blacklist went live, YouTube was added to it and blocked. Gabriela Baczynska writes, "Russian officials offered assurances they were not seeking to block access to YouTube on Wednesday, saying a technical error caused the popular video-sharing website to appear briefly on a register of sites containing banned content." Read the rest

Homophobic Chick-Fil-A in a chickeny shitstorm

Homophobic chicken-slingers Chick-Fil-A are reeling in a tempest of bad publicity. First the Jim Henson company yanked its toys from its stores, then the mayor of Boston told it that it should set up business elsewhere, and now a mysterious stranger has begun to astroturf on its behalf on Facebook. Chick-Fil-A says that it has no idea who the person pretending to be a teenage girl who really passionately supports the cause of discrimination against homosexuals is (though I'm sure they appreciate "her" support) -- and for the record, they say that Henson's toys were withdrawn for "safety" reasons. Read the rest

Flash in the pan

Adobe is finally giving up on Flash in mobile browsers, according to Jason Perlow at ZDNet. Read the rest