Down with the Laugh-Out-Loud Cats


Adam "Ape Lad" Koford's published a new collection of his wonderful Laugh-Out-Loud Cats comics, Down with the Laugh-Out-Loud Cats. The collection is pure, distilled charm.

The Laugh-Out-Loud Cats are the lineal descendants of strips like Peanuts, which mixed extremely contemporary references (in this case, references to Internet slang) with a timeless, childlike humor, and great character design. Pip and Kitteh are eternal hobos on the backroads of the Internet age, shamelessly mixing puns and sight gags in a way that is purely sweet.

As a bonus, this volume is interspersed with the hobo illustrations Ape Lad did for Hodgman's Areas of My Expertise. If you love cute animals, hobos, and Internet humor, you will love The Laugh-Out-Loud Cats.

See also: Gweek 121: The Return of Ape Lad

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Webcomics pioneer Joey Manley dies

Joey Manley, creator of Modern Tales, online comics trail-blazer, podcaster and author, died last week at 48. Many tributes are being posted to his Facebook page; Kevin Melrose published an obituary at Comic Book Resources.
He “was a true pioneer of webcomics,” retailer and convention organizer Chris Butcher wrote last night on Twitter. Cartoonist T Campbell went more in-depth about Manley’s contributions on his blog, writing, “There was a brief moment, hard to remember now, when webcomics and the Web in general seemed to be unsustainable through advertising. Ad rates were in freefall, panicking artists who, a few years prior, had thought they were more or less set for life. Joey knew how to talk to people, how to bring talent together, and he was the one willing to address the elephant in the room: maybe we needed to change the business model.”

XKCD's Substitutions: the Chrome extension that makes reading the news more fun


Today's XKCD webcomic, Substitutions, proposes a set of word-substitutions to "make reading the news more fun." Naturally, it's already a Chrome extension.

xkcd substitutions extension (via Hacker News)

Employment advice for Millennials


Diesel Sweeties creator R. Stevens has some advice for Millennials who are having a hard time finding work in the modern economy. It's so simple!

Six Totally Easy Tips For Millennials To Get Ahead In Today’s Economy (via Wil Wheaton)

20th Century headlines as modern linkbait

XKCD's Headlines presents a timeline of the 20th century with the major milestones summarized in A/B tested, linkbaity, listicle headlines.

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Hyperbole and a Half: now in book form!


Hyperbole and a Half, a webcomic that is so funny, manic, and (at times) emotionally wrenching that it deserves its own entire category, has finally spawned a book! The book, subtitled "Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened" reprints many of Allie Brosh's best-loved pieces, and, excitingly, includes some all-new work which I can't wait to read. Brosh is unlike anyone else in the field today, an Internet-era treasure, an unexpected wonder of the 21st century. I don't know how she does it, but I'm delighted to have ordered my own copy, and was fascinated by this interview with Wired's Laura Hudson:

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Introducing Bani Garu, a new webcomic by Lea Hernandez

Welcome Lea Hernandez, whose new webcomic, Bani Garu, begins today here at Boing Boing. It's the story of her time in Japan...

In 1989, I was an Ascended Anime Fangirl: I was picked to be the vice-president of General Products USA, the American merchandising arm of the notorious Japanese animation studio Gainax, best known for the sci-fi anime Evangelion.

I was working with the people who'd made an astounding amateur video set to ELO's "Twilight" and less than five years later were pro and making a chain of cult hits. Ascended fanboys. My people.

My people who took me on a year-long trip down a rabbit hole of reality.

Bani Garu: Problems from the start

Nimona: sweet, funny fantasy webcomic about villains, sidekicks and so-called heroes


Noelle Stevenson's "Nimona" is a great, lighthearted (but full-throated) serial fantasy webcomic about the complex relationship between heroes and villains. It's well into its ninth chapter, and is slated for collection in a graphic novel in 2015.

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Christopher Columbus: raping, murdering, enslaving, genocidal pedophile


The latest of The Oatmeal makes a pretty compelling case for hating Christopher Columbus, whose achievements ("discovering" America, sailing from Europe to America, proving the curvature of the Earth) are all BS. More importantly, though, is what Columbus did do: launched a campaign of genocide in order to terrorize indigenous people gold-mining slavery, a program buoyed up by mass slaughter, mutilations, and systematic sexual slavery of girls as young as nine or ten.

Matthew Inman, the Oatmeal's author, proposes celebrating the life of Barolome de las Casas, who also set out to slave and murder his way through the New World, but changed his mind, took the cloth, and spent 50 years defending indigenous people. That's a nice idea, but if we're going to celebrate the struggle of indigenous people against genocide and slavery, maybe the right people to celebrate are the indigenous heroes and victims of Europeans, not Europeans who thought better of the unconscionable, no matter how thoroughly they repented.

Inman cites Howard Zinn's excellent People's History of the United States as a primary reference for the piece, and I concur: Zinn's work and those derived from it (like the graphic novel and the audio of dramatic readings) are important and fantastic works.

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Grim infographic future: everything will be tall, with meaningless graphs

In Tall Infographics, XKCD offers a dystopian prediction for the future of information, in which all crucial data is offered in stupidly tall infographics with lots of meaningless diagrams.

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DRM standards, the harmonica version


As the Internet comes to grips with the news that the World Wide Web Consortium has decided to press ahead with DRM in HTML5, here's a timely strip from the Flea Snobbery webcomic (excerpted above).

Harmonica (Thanks, Guido!)

How to talk to your friends about giving up coffee


Today on a very special Diesel Sweeties webcomic installment, an important dialog for coffee-drinkers to practice with their faithless peers.

NO EXIT : diesel sweeties robot webcomic & geeky t-shirts

Asteroid named after Randall "XKCD" Munroe

Holy. Smokes. Randall "XKCD" Munroe has had an asteroid named after him. Good old 4292 is big enough to wipe out life on Earth, but alas, its Mars/Jupiter orbit is boringly stable. Still, there's hope it will decay eventually, and create the splash Randy deserves!

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Decrypting Rita: science-fictional webcomic about parallel worlds and doomed romance


Egypt Urnash sez, "'Decrypting Rita' is a SF comic I've been working on for the past couple years. It's about a robot lady who's dragged outside of reality by her ex-boyfriend; she's got to pull herself together across four parallel worlds before a hive-mind can take over the entire planet. It's a slickly-drawn story that plays around with narrative in ways only comics can do; those four parallel worlds run beside each other on the page, twining around each other in various ways."

It's a damned good read, but I had trouble with the type-size on my laptop display -- maybe one to save for your bigger screens.

Decrypting Rita (Thanks, Egypt!)

Diesel Sweeties music humor book: I'm a Rocker, I Rock Out.


Rich Stevens from the wonderful Diesel Sweeties webcomic has released a new collection of music-themed strips called I'm a Rocker, I Rock Out. The Venn diagram above (available as a t-shirt, of course) pretty much nails Stevens's theme and humor here: a dry and extremely funny look at the strange relationship between taste, art, music, culture and identity. I laughed my ass off (when I wasn't wincing at foibles I recognized in myself). The thematically linked strips are a great idea -- reminds me of the old MAD Magazine anthologies. Below, some of my favorites from the book.

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