Leopard's head freed from cooking pot

leopard 1

A leopard lurched around blindly for five hours in a village in Rajasthan, North India, before wildlife experts tranquilized it and removed a cooking pot from its head.

The 150lb animal got stuck after drinking water from the vessel. Locals took photos and videos as it tried to remove the pot, to no avail.

It was reportedly "none the worse for wear" after being tranquilized and freed, however, according to the BBC—the only loser being the owner of the now-sawn-off pot.

More seriously (and frequently), critters often die after getting their heads stuck in Yoplait snack pots, leading to recurring calls for the company to change the design. Read the rest

Our dog dreaming, snoring, hiccuping


Heather shot this spectacular, breakneck footage of Tricksy (random New Mexico desert dog; rescued) asleep on the couch, dreaming of another fine breakfast. Read the rest

Helpful video explains how to make a hamster flat


The key is to keep petting it until it collapses into a puddle of happiness. Read the rest

Duck lanes painted on canal paths


The Canal & River Trust painted the markings on towpaths in London, and other large cities, to remind us we share the space with nature: "It just wouldn’t be possible to paint lanes on the towpath for all our different visitors," an organizer told Quartz, "so we thought the ducks could have one instead." Read the rest

Seal slept in driveway, car wash


A seal has taken to wandering a New Zealand suburb, then crashing just wherever. Today it was found sleeping at a local car wash by employees turning up for the morning shift—and it wasn't the creature's first unusual stop-off point.

Laura Walters and Paul Eastern report that the seal was, for the second day, herded into a cage and released on a nearby beach.

It woke up around midday, and waved a flipper at the crowd of about 50 people who were watching. The increased activity prompted Doc staff to move people further away from the lost mammal.Uwash owner Kirit Makan said the seal was the most unusual customer he had encountered at his carwash. … DOC ranger Stefan Sebregts said the seal was the same male that was found wandering on a Papakura street on Monday.

It was likely he came ashore because he was sick of the stormy weather and needed a rest, Sebregts said.

Yesterday, the Papakura seal's first adventure ended in a the occupation of a local's driveway, after a day spent alarming and enchanting passers-by. The New Zealand Herald's Anna Leask reports on efforts to herd the seal back to safety.

When Danny Yong woke up this morning and found his house surrounded by police and firefighters - he naturally panicked.

"I thought I'd got myself into trouble somehow. Then my flatmates went outside and saw a seal in the driveway," he said.

Unbeknown to Mr Yong, the now-named Papakura Seal had settled into his Coles Cres driveway and was in no hurry to move.

Read the rest

Bees ground Delta flight

Honeybees clustered under the wing of a Delta Airlines flight at Pittsburgh International Airport last week; the plane could not depart until a beekeeper was summoned to take possession of the swarm. CBS reporter Mary Robb Jackson adds that swarms of bees are not uncommon at the airport, where 25,000 to 30,000 occupied Taxiway-C last May. [KDKA] Read the rest

Baby deer saved

A cute, speckled deer "scampered" into the woods Thursday after being rescued from a 20-ft hole in Suffolk County, NY. [Huffington Post. Photo: Suffolk County Police Department]

• Two grey tiger kittens who spent hours trapped in a drain pipe were rescued by Ingham County Animal Control. Officials believe the kittens were thirsty, and did not realize that the pipes were slippery. [Battle Creek Inquirer]

• Puppies! Pongo the Rottweiler mix was rescued from a dumpster in Riverside, Ca., only hours before it was scheduled for pickup and crushing. Meanwhile, 57 puppies were rescued from a puppy mill by officers from Brunswick and New Hanover County Sheriff's department: "The raid was initially planned for next week, but ... the conditions were so bad, they had to take action earlier." [PE.com]

• Sadly, a group of campers in Nova Scotia was rescued from a circling pack of coyotes, which will now go hungry. [UPI, which deserves much kudos for finding stock art of a disappointed coyote] Read the rest

See-through Jewel Caterpillar

Here's a photo of the Jewel Caterpillar (Acraga coa), snapped by Gerardo Aizpuru near Cancun, and submitted to Project Noah. Be sure to click through for other views. Wow.

Photo take in a mangrove area , found this Stoning translucent caterpillar lay on a Red Mangrove tree leaf this morning early. Just can believe there is some species like this around the world. looks like made of glass whit small red mushroom inside every pic. about 3 cm long.

Jewel Caterpillar (via Geekologie) Read the rest

Medvedev cat safe

Following rumors that his cat had run away from home, Russian president Dmitry Medvedev reassured Twitter, the nation and the world that Dorofei is safe. This is not Dorofei's first scrape; he once lost a fight with neighbor and former president Mikhail Gorbachev's cat. [Reuters] Read the rest

Happy cows

A herd of Holstein cows, just released from the winter barn. [YouTube via Metafilter] Previously. Read the rest

I have no idea what you're doing

At a dog show in Shenyang, China, a Tibetan Mastiff has no idea whatsoever what this man is trying to achieve. Photo: REUTERS/Sheng Li Read the rest

Honeybees can smell TB

New Zealand biologists believe that honeybees can sense the faint floral odor on the breath of people infected with tuberculosis, and are trying to find a way to train bees to help them diagnose TB:

“When we tested them with the tuberculosis odours we found the bees can still smell it down to parts per billion,” says Max Suckling.

Christchurch zoologists are training bees to associate the smell of the disease with a sweet treat and to stick out their tongues when it's present.

Worldwide new TB infections occur at a rate of one per second. Right now it's diagnosed medically by expensive tests and with the disease being most common in poverty stricken areas, using bees instead could make a real difference.

Bees help in the battle against tuberculosis (Thanks, Gnat!)

(Image: Honeybee on Snakeroot, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from dendroica's photostream) Read the rest