Kickstarting Bikequity, a feminist bicycle zine about class and social justice

Elly Blue (previously) writes, "Bikequity is the 14th issue of my long-running (since 2010) feminist bike zine, Taking the Lane." Read the rest

A university librarian explains why her zine collection's catalog is open access

Marta Chudolinska is Learning Zone Librarian at the Ontario College of Art and Design University, which hosts a huge zine collection founded in 2007 Alicia Nauta, then a student. Read the rest

Indie feminist technology magazine "The Recompiler" needs $3000 to get to year three

Sumana writes, "The Recompiler is a feminist technology magazine launched in 2015. Their goal is to help people learn about technology in a fun, playful way, and highlight a diverse range of backgrounds and experiences. They're running a fundraiser right now, asking for $3,000 in subscriptions, book orders, contributions and ads, to publish the seventh issue on time and sail into its third year, and they've made $2236 so far. And for every $500 raised, podcast host Christie Koehler will record a dramatic reading of a tongue-twister." Read the rest

"I read zines to escape surveillance and clickbait."

Zine publisher Jonno Revanche says he likes zines because they are not connected to a network infected with crap: clickbait, tracking, trolls, etc.

From his piece in The Guardian:

There’s a liberty to creating, or witnessing subversive material knowing that it won’t be monitored, that the information is contained only within the pages of the zine. The trustworthiness of a physical object in our current age is strangely compelling. Links shared via Facebook or messenger apps can be intercepted, logged, or dispersed otherwise into the ether. Especially for teenagers, zines counter the anxiety and subsequent frantic deletion of browser history so that your family can’t see it. Hide it under your bed instead, or in a zipped inner sanctum within your school bag.

(Thanks, Kathi!) Read the rest

Creative Computing: the amazing, countercultural look-and-feel of homebrew computing zines

John Park writes, "Check out what Tony D just posted at Adafruit after he visited the Living Computers Museum + Lab." Read the rest

Call for submissions for Disobedient Electronics

"'Disobedient Electronics' is a zine-oriented publishing project that seeks submissions from industrial designers, electronic artists, hackers and makers that disobey conventions, especially work that is used to highlight injustices, discrimination or abuses of power." Read the rest

Zine goddess Chloe Eudaly is running for Portland City Council

Chloe Eudaly, whose zine emporium Reading Frenzy (previously) and publishing makerspace the Independent Publishing Resource Center are PDX institutions, is running for Portland City Council, campaigning on affordable housing for all in a city whose longterm residents are being left behind by runaway rents and spiraling housing prices. Read the rest

Free Press – A pictorial history of underground newspapers 1965-1975

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Free Press: Underground and Alternative Publications 1965-1975 by Jean-François Bizot (editor) Universe 2006, 264 pages, 9 x 1.1 x 13.5 inches (softcover) $17 Buy one on Amazon

The mid-1960s were an exciting time for art, music, youth culture, society, and politics, all of which were transforming at dizzying speed. The left wing underground press of the time reflected these mind-boggling changes in their design, content, and distribution methods. Underground newspapers from around the world joined the Underground Press Syndicate, sharing articles and illustrations free of copyright restrictions.

These papers gleefully taunted the establishment by promoting recreational drugs, recreational sex, black power, gay rights, women’s liberation, anti-authoritarianism, and anti-war activism. The covers of the papers were bold, experimental, and subversive. When I was designing bOING bOING (the late 1980s/early 1990s zine) I was inspired by the precious few samples of The East Village Other, The Realist, and The Gothic Blimp Works that I could find in used bookstores. I wish I’d had a copy of Free Press back then! Almost every page of this book has a full-color photo of a cover or interior page from dozens of well-known and obscure newspapers from the era. Though much of the design is amateurish and ugly, there are examples of brilliance, too, making this a worthy reference for designers.

Read the rest

Venerable hacker zine Phrack publishes its first issue in four years

Phrack has been publishing erratically since 1985, but the four year gap between the previous issue, published in April 2012, and the current issue, published yesterday, was so long that many (me included) feared it might have died. Read the rest

The Torist: a literary journal on the darknet

The Torist is a newly launched literary journal, edited by University of Utah Communications associate professor Robert W Gehl and a person called GMH, collecting fiction, poetry and non-fiction. It is only available as a file on a Tor hidden service -- a "darkweb" site, protected by the same technology as was used by the likes of Silk Road. Read the rest

Liartown USA's "Apple Cabin Foods" calendar, to benefit Reading Frenzy

Original Crap Hound and Internet graphic sarcasm sultan Sean Tejaratchi is back with his annual calendar, sold to benefit Reading Frenzy, Portland, Oregon's world-beating zine store and independent publishing emporius. Read the rest

Documentary about the rise and fall of Tower records

I loved Tower Records. Not for the records (though I bought a lot of them there), but for the tremendous book and zine section. That's where I discovered Re/Search books and a ton of great obscure periodicals. It pains me whenever I see the crappy boring businesses that now occupy the former Tower Records store locations in Los Angeles.

Established in 1960, Tower Records was once a retail powerhouse with two hundred stores, in thirty countries, on five continents. From humble beginnings in a small-town drugstore, Tower Records eventually became the heart and soul of the music world, and a powerful force in the music industry. In 1999, Tower Records made $1 billion. In 2006, the company filed for bankruptcy. What went wrong? Everyone thinks they know what killed Tower Records: The Internet. But thats not the story. All Things Must Pass is a feature documentary film examining this iconic companys explosive trajectory, tragic demise, and legacy forged by its rebellious founder, Russ Solomon. Directed by Colin Hanks.

Read the rest

Check out a fanzine about 'the internet's microconsole'

Contributors like Terry Cavanagh, Devine Lu Linvega and Arnaud De Bock, as well as PICO-8 developer Zep, among others, have made the stylish, cute 48-page fanzine -- free digitally -- for users interested in learning more about the elegant little digital console.

Kickstarting an omnibus of seminal punk zine BLT

It's been 25 years since the zine BLT started, the early intersection of punk and and desktop publishing. Read the rest

Reality Sandwich interview with me about the early days of Boing Boing

Todd Brendan Fahey interviewed me for Reality Sandwich about the zine phase of Boing Boing, and beyond. I gave him this photo of me pasting little bits of paper to the cover of Boing Boing issue #2, which came out in 1988 or 1989. Read the rest

Creative science journal, including the science of Wookiees

Dave Ng writes, "The Science Creative Quarterly is pleased to release its first volume of both a print offering of collected works, AND the much vaulted Annals of Praetachoral Mechanics." Read the rest

World War 3 Illustrated: prescient outrage from the dawn of the Piketty apocalypse

The Reagan era kicked off a project to dismantle social mobility and equitable justice. This trenchant, angry, gorgeous graphic zine launched in response.

More posts