Horse Association must accept clones on registry

The American Quarter Horse Association has been ordered to accept cloned horses into its registry by a jury in the courtoom of U.S. District Court Judge Mary Lou Robinson. They were sued by a pair of Texas breeders, who said the organization's practice of excluding cloned horses was monopolistic. The judge did rule on awarding costs to the breeders, who spent some $900,000 on the case. Read the rest

Life on the Fringes of Cyberculture: An Interview with Gareth Branwyn

A rare copy of Darick Chamberlin's Cigarette Boy is one of the reward packs for contributing to Gareths's Kickstarter.

Our buddy Gareth was interviewed for Vice's Motherboard. Gareth's in the final hours of a Kickstarter for his book, Borg Like Me, which is going to be amazing!

Motherboard: You've described yourself as "Cyborg-in-Chief" in the past, and your new book is called Borg Like Me. Why the cyborg label?

Branwyn: I am literally a cyborg. I have a cobalt-chrome and titanium hip, a rebuilt heart, and every six weeks, I go to a Rheumatologist's office and I sit there for three hours while they slowly drip tweaked mice proteins into me—a biological that's used to treat a severe form of spinal arthritis.

But I think we're all actually cyborgs at this point. We wear glasses, contact lenses, hearing aids, take all sorts of sophisticated drugs (and in my case, bioengineered proteins) to adjust our biochemistry, we carry a brain annex around, forgotten in our pockets, and we spend many hours of every day soft-wired into the global brain and media spew of the internet.

Life on the Fringes of Cyberculture: An Interview with Gareth Branwyn Read the rest

Molars colonized by ambitious antiquarian architecture

This pair of striking images of teeth colonized by ambitious antiquarian architecture are part of a campaign for Maxam toothpaste from JWT Shanghai; the slogan is "Don't let germs settle down."

MAXAM Civilization-Egypt / Civilization-Rome / JWT Shanghai

(via JWZ) Read the rest

Fear of clustered small holes

The Trypophobia subreddit is a place for posting photos of things with clusters of small holes or pits in them, like lotus plants, funguses, multi-chambered plants, and strange infections. Trypophobia is the (not medically recognized) fear of "objects with small holes." It sounded weird to me, but after clicking through the first couple-dozen links, I was massively squicked. Shown here, Ethiopian injera bread from Apple Pie, Patis, and Pâté Recipes. Normally, I love the stuff, but in the context, I have to admit, it gives me the frisson.

The most common phobia you've never heard of.

(Thanks, Fipi Lele!) Read the rest

Kinetic sand - cool weird material to play with

[Video Link] I want some!

Kinetic Sand Read the rest

Gweek 107: Adrian Tomine and Rob Walker

Your browser does not support the audio tag.

This episode of Gweek is brought to you by Bespoke Post, a monthly box of cool-stuff for guys. Visit bespokepost.com/boing or use the code BOING at checkout to get 20% off your first box.

Guests:

Adrian Tomine is a cartoonist whose books include Shortcomings, Summer Blonde, and his ongoing comic book series Optic Nerve. He’s also a regular contributor to The New Yorker, and the first ten years of his work for that magazine was recently collected in the book New York Drawings.

Rob Walker is a technology and culture columnist for Yahoo News, a regular contributor to Design Observer, and he just started a new “watercooler therapy” advice column called The Workologist for the New York Times Sunday business section. His latest book is called Significant Objects: 100 Extraordinary Stories About Ordinary Things, co-edited with Joshua Glenn.

GET GWEEK: RSS | On iTunes | Download episode | Listen on Stitcher Read the rest

Things that correlate with autism

"Things that correlate with autism" is basically an entire genre of scientific research, in and of itself, and nobody does a better job of breaking those studies down than Emily Willingham. Her latest piece is about a recent study that correlates induced labor at birth with autism diagnosis later in life. Read the rest

Angry monkey scalp-tattoo

An anonymous Internet fellow had the back of his scalp tattooed with a rather fetching angry monkey. I'm not sure if he had his head shaved and inked, or if this is male-pattern baldness, but I would appreciate any background you could provide in our comments.

(via Geekologie) Read the rest

The difference between "being right" and "being persuasive"

If you're into science literacy — or, even, if you're just into arguing with other people on the Internet about science — you need to read this post by neuroscientist Chris Holdgraf. It's a great explanation of why "the data speaks for itself" isn't a particularly good retort (and can, in fact, be misleading) and why sacrificing a little accuracy for the sake of understanding is a better idea than it sounds. Read the rest

What it feels like to be schizophrenic

Quora asks "What does it feel like to have schizophrenia?" The answers are, by turns, haunting, heartbreaking, and thoroughly engrossing. They also provide a really unique opportunity to better understand how the human brain operates, and what happens when it turns in on itself. Definitely worth reading. Read the rest

Cops accidentally record themselves admitting they harassed activist at rodeo owners' request: "God, we're gonna get sued"

An anti-rodeo/animal right activist was subjected to a blatantly illegal, harassing traffic stop after he was asked to leave an Oregon rodeo. How do we know it was illegal? Because the cops who stopped him forgot to turn off their own cameras and recorded themselves admitting that the rodeo (which is a major donor to the Malheur County Sheriff's Department) had demanded the traffic stop. The same cops who participated in the stop were previously at the center of a lawsuit that the county settled in which they were alleged to have fabricated evidence, so they've got form for this. Some dialog highlights: Read the rest

Adam Savage on simple ideas and big discoveries

Adam Savage is a happy mutant hero, a master maker with ethics, personality, warmth, and wit. We are honored that Adam, co-host of Mythbusters, co-founder of Tested, and BB contributor, will speak at our Boing Boing: Ingenuity theatrical experience on Sunday, August 18, in San Francisco! Won't be there in person? Don't fret! We'll be documenting the whole shebang on video for sharing on the site in the coming weeks! Meanwhile, here's Adam's take on "How Simple Ideas Lead To Scientific Discoveries."

Boing Boing: Ingenuity in partnership with Ford C-Max.

Read the rest

Bradley Manning expected to speak at trial today; email with female selfie released

We've been following the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning here at Boing Boing, and I have visited the trial periodically to live-blog the proceedings in person. Today is expected to be a significant day at Fort Meade: the 25-year-old former Army intel analyst is expected to make a statement to the court, as Judge Col. Denise Lind weighs the sentence he will receive. Kevin Gosztola, Nathan Fuller, and Alexa O'Brien are among the few reporters/bloggers who have been there daily, for months. Alexa says:

Kevin is liveblogging here, at Firedoglake. I've gathered some of their tweets from the Fort Meade media operations center below, summarizing witnesses' statements and the vibe around the press center (in a word, tense). Look for today's transcripts at the Freedom of the Press Foundation website later today (the court isn't releasing official transcripts, but we've sent stenographers, crowd-funded and permitted by the judge with your help). Here are yesterday's transcripts: morning, afternoon.

One of the big reveals over the last few days of the trial: "My Problem" [PDF] an email Manning sent on Saturday, April 24, 2010 to his then-supervisor, former Master Sgt. Paul Adkins. The message amounted to a confession that Manning was transgender, and felt unable to transition within the military environment in Iraq. Read the rest

XKCD on Google Glass countermeasures

XKCD's Randall Munroe brings the funny in an especially intense and eeeevil way with the latest strip: Anti-Glass. Read the rest

For the New York Times, on a very special day

[from the IT Crowd] Read the rest

Swarms of tiny bug drones: how the US Air Force plans to spy on China

"The US Air Force wants drone-makers to invent tiny aircraft -- nano-drones -- that can fly vast distances to spy on an enemy." An official said Tuesday the bug-like surveillance bots could be particularly useful in the Pacific region, an area that represents the toughest challenge for American spyplanes: eyeing China, which has strong air defenses. [Foreign Policy] Read the rest

Irish government updates its Freedom of Information law with exciting new "Computers don't exist" provision

When the Irish government updated its Freedom of Information law, it promised something fit for the computer era. To say it did not deliver is rather an understatement.

The new bill (PDF) says: "the FOI body shall take reasonable steps to search for and extract the records to which the request relates, having due regard to the steps that would be considered reasonable if the records were held in paper format."

Get that? The standard for whether a FOI request is reasonable is whether it would be easy to get if the records were on paper and in a filing cabinet. If the records can be retrieved from a database with one click, but would take a hundred years with a filing cabinet, then the records can remain secret forever, because clicking once is deemed unreasonable.

As Simon McGarr puts it: "The Irish State wishes to uninvent computers. Read the rest

More posts